Everything you need to know for Saturday’s Quaker State 400 at Kentucky

Leave a comment

Intermediate-sized ovals make up the majority of the landscape in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series.

You see them so often that sometimes, you forget that they have their own little quirks and quickly slap them with the “cookie cutter” tag.

That’s not the case, however, with Kentucky Speedway, which will host the Sprint Cup circus this Saturday night in the Quaker State 400.

This 1.5-miler is bumpy and rough. Handling is important here, and with no repaves in over a decade, multiple grooves have formed up for drivers to use. All the elements for a good, big track show are in place.

Courtesy of NASCAR’s public relations and statistics teams, here’s everything you need to know heading into Round 17 of the 2014 Sprint Cup regular season…

KENTUCKY-SPECIFIC STATISTICS

Kurt Busch (No. 41 Haas Automation Chevrolet)
· Two top 10s
· Average finish of 11.3
· Average Running Position of 13.3, 10th-best
· Driver Rating of 90.6, 10th-best
· 21 Fastest Laps Run, 10th-most
· 202 Green Flag Passes, 12th-most
· Average Green Flag Speed of 170.530 mph, 12th-fastest
· 92 Quality Passes (passes of cars in the top 15 under green), ninth-most

Kyle Busch (No. 18 M&M’s Toyota)
· One win, two top fives, three top 10s
· Average finish of 5.3
· Average Running Position of 5.4, second-best
· Driver Rating of 125.2, second-best
· 104 Fastest Laps Run, second-most
· Average Green Flag Speed of 171.765 mph, second-fastest
· 740 Laps in the Top 15 (92.4%), third-most

Carl Edwards (No. 99 UPS Ford)
· One top five, one top 10
· Average finish of 15.3
· Average Running Position of 9.8, fourth-best
· Driver Rating of 94.5, seventh-best
· 20 Fastest Laps Run, 12th-most
· Average Green Flag Speed of 170.987 mph, sixth-fastest
· 643 Laps in the Top 15 (80.3%), fourth-most
· 104 Quality Passes, sixth-most

Jeff Gordon (No. 24 Drive To End Hunger Chevrolet)
· One top five, three top 10s
· Average finish of 7.7
· Average Running Position of 13.2, ninth-best
· Driver Rating of 91.8, eighth-best
· 31 Fastest Laps Run, seventh-most
· 230 Green Flag Passes, third-most
· Average Green Flag Speed of 170.854 mph, seventh-fastest
· 514 Laps in the Top 15 (64.2%), ninth-most
· 119 Quality Passes, second-most

Denny Hamlin (No. 11 FedEx Office Toyota)
· One top five, one top 10
· Average finish of 16.3
· Average Running Position of 12.5, sixth-best
· Driver Rating of 98.1, sixth-best
· 34 Fastest Laps Run, sixth-most
· Average Green Flag Speed of 171.223 mph, fifth-fastest
· 531 Laps in the Top 15 (66.3%), eighth-most

Kevin Harvick (No. 4 Budweiser Chevrolet)
· One top 10
· Average finish of 12.3
· Average Running Position of 12.2, fifth-best
· Driver Rating of 90.5, 11th-best
· 225 Green Flag Passes, fourth-most
· Average Green Flag Speed of 170.830 mph, eighth-fastest
· 628 Laps in the Top 15 (78.4%), fifth-most
· 110 Quality Passes, fourth-most

Jimmie Johnson (No. 48 Lowe’s Chevrolet)
· One top five, three top 10s; one pole
· Average finish of 6.0
· Series-best Average Running Position of 3.9
· Series-best Driver Rating of 125.9
· Series-high 118 Fastest Laps Run
· Series-best Average Green Flag Speed of 172.196 mph
· Series-high 783 Laps in the Top 15 (97.8%)
· 108 Quality Passes, fifth-most

Kasey Kahne (No. 5 Great Clips Chevrolet)
· One top five, one top 10
· Average finish of 8.7
· Average Running Position of 14.0, 12th-best
· Driver Rating of 98.2, fifth-best
· 52 Fastest Laps Run, fifth-most
· Series-high 313 Green Flag Passes
· Average Green Flag Speed of 171.289 mph, fourth-fastest
· 472 Laps in the Top 15 (58.9%), 11th-most
· 116 Quality Passes, third-most

Matt Kenseth (No. 20 Dollar General Toyota)
· One win, one top five, three top 10s
· Average finish of 4.7
· Average Running Position of 8.3, third-best
· Driver Rating of 109.3, third-best
· 67 Fastest Laps Run, fourth-most
· Average Green Flag Speed of 171.542 mph, third-fastest
· 775 Laps in the Top 15 (96.8%), second-most
· Series-high 157 Quality Passes

Brad Keselowski (No. 2 Miller Lite Ford)
· One win, one top five, two top 10s
· Average finish of 13.7
· Average Running Position of 13.2, eighth-best
· Driver Rating of 104.8, fourth-best
· 72 Fastest Laps Run, third-most
· 573 Laps in the Top 15 (71.5%), sixth-most

Joey Logano (No. 22 Shell Pennzoil Ford)
· One top five, one top 10
· Average finish of 13.3
· Driver Rating of 87.2, 12th-best
· 202 Green Flag Passes, 12th-most
· 92 Quality Passes, ninth-most

Martin Truex Jr. (No. 78 Furniture Row Chevrolet)
· Two top 10s
· Average finish of 11.0
· Average Running Position of 12.6, seventh-best
· Driver Rating of 90.7, ninth-best
· 203 Green Flag Passes, 11th-most
· Average Green Flag Speed of 170.746 mph, ninth-fastest
· 555 Laps in the Top 15 (69.3%), seventh-most
· 101 Quality Passes, eighth-most

source:

Track Data
Season Race #: 16 of 36 (06-28-14)
Track Size: 1.5-miles
Banking/Turn 1 & 2: 14 degrees
Banking/Turn 3 & 4: 14 degrees
Banking/Frontstretch: 8 degrees
Banking/Backstretch: 8 degrees
Frontstretch Length: 1,662 feet
Backstretch Length: 1,600 feet
Race Length: 200 laps / 300 miles

Top 10 Driver Ratings at Kentucky
Jimmie Johnson…………………… 125.9
Kyle Busch…………………………. 125.2
Matt Kenseth……………………….. 109.3
Brad Keselowski………………….. 104.8
Kasey Kahne………………………… 98.2
Denny Hamlin……………………….. 98.1
Carl Edwards………………………… 94.5
Jeff Gordon………………………….. 91.8
Martin Truex Jr………………………. 90.7
Kurt Busch……………………………. 90.6
Note: Driver Ratings compiled from 2005-2013 races (three total) among active drivers at Kentucky Speedway.

Qualifying/Race Data
2013 Coors Light Pole winner: Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 183.636 mph, 29.406 secs., 06-29-13
2013 race winner: Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 131.948 mph, (03:02:07), 06-30-13
Track qualifying record: Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 183.636 mph, 29.406 secs., 06-29-13
Track race record: Brad Keselowski., Dodge, 145.607 mph, (02:45:02), 06-30-12

History
· In 1998, the track broke ground in Sparta, Kentucky, and opened as a 1.5-mile speedway in 2000.
· The original owners, Jerry Carroll and four other investors owned the track until 2008, when current owners, Speedway Motorsports Inc. purchased the facility.
· The first NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race was held in 2011 – won by Kyle Busch.

Notebook
· There have been three NASCAR Sprint Cup races at Kentucky Speedway since the first race in 2011 – one race per season.
· 53 drivers have competed in at least one NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at Kentucky Speedway; 42 in more than one.
· The first NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Qualifying at Kentucky was cancelled due to weather. The starting line-up was set per the Rule Book.
· Jimmie Johnson and Dale Earnhardt Jr. are the only two drivers that have won Coors Light poles at Kentucky.
· Youngest Kentucky pole winner: Jimmie Johnson (06/30/2012 – 36 years, nine months, 13 days).
· Oldest Kentucky pole winner: Dale Earnhardt Jr. (06/30/2013 – 38 years, eight months, 20 days).
· Three different NSCS drivers have won at Kentucky Speedway: Kyle Busch (07/09/2011), Brad Keselowski (06/30/2012) and Matt Kenseth (6/30/2013).
· Youngest Kentucky winner: Kyle Busch (07/09/2011 – 26 years, two months, seven days).
· Oldest Kentucky winner: Matt Kenseth (06/30/2013 – 41 years, three months, 20 days).
· Joe Gibbs Racing leads the series in wins at Kentucky with two (2011, 2013); followed by Penske Racing (2012) with one.
· Two different manufacturers have won in the NSCS at Kentucky: Toyota (2011, 2013) and Dodge (2012).
· Kyle Busch won the inaugural NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at Kentucky from the first starting position. Due to the qualifying session being cancelled for the 2011 race it was not from the Coors Light pole.
· One of the three (33.3%) NASCAR Sprint Cup Series races at Kentucky have been won from the front row.
· Two of the NASCAR Sprint Cup races at Kentucky have been won from a top-10 starting position.
· The deepest in the field that a race winner has started at Kentucky was 16th, by Matt Kenseth last season.
· Three different drivers have posted NSCS runner-up finishes at Kentucky: David Reutimann (2011), Kasey Kahne (2012) and Jamie McMurray (2013).
· Kyle Busch leads the series in top-five finishes at Kentucky with two.
· Kyle Busch, Jeff Gordon, Jimmie Johnson and Matt Kenseth lead the series in top-10 finishes at Kentucky with three each.
· Kyle Busch leads all active drivers in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series in average starting position at Kentucky with a 2.333.
· Matt Kenseth leads all active drivers in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series in average finishing position at Kentucky with a 4.667. Kyle Busch (5.333), Jimmie Johnson (6.000), Jeff Gordon (7.667), and Kasey Kahne (8.667)are the other active drivers with an average finish in the top 10.
· Since the advent of electronic scoring the closest margin of victory (MOV) in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series at Kentucky Speedway was the July 9, 2011 race won by Kyle Busch over David Reutimann with a MOV of 0.179 second.
· None of the three NASCAR Sprint Cup Series races at Kentucky Speedway have resulted with a green-white-checkered finish.
· None of the three NASCAR Sprint Cup Series races at Kentucky Speedway have been shortened due to weather conditions.
· Qualifying has been cancelled due to weather conditions in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series at Kentucky Speedway once; the 2011 race.
· Kyle Busch leads all active drivers in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series in laps led at Kentucky with 243 laps led in three starts. Jimmie Johnson has led the second-most with 203.
· Danica Patrick is the only female driver to compete in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series at Kentucky Speedway.
source:
A
· There have been four NASCAR Sprint Cup races among two tracks in Kentucky: 3 at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, and 1 at Corbin Speedway in Corbin.
· 42 drivers in NASCAR national series history have their home state recorded as Kentucky; three have posted wins in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series.
source:

Mercedes F1 engine chief warns against underestimating Honda

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Mercedes Formula 1 engine chief Andy Cowell has warned against underestimating the threat of Honda despite its ongoing power unit struggles, tipping the Japanese manufacturer to bounce back in the near future.

Honda returned to F1 as a manufacturer in 2015, supplying V6 turbo power units to the McLaren team, but has struggled for either performance or reliability through that period.

The struggles have led McLaren – currently sat bottom of the constructors’ championship – to consider cutting ties for 2018 given how far adrift compared to the other three engine suppliers Honda has been.

Mercedes has been the benchmark for engine performance since the change in regulation for 2014, but Cowell feels that Honda could make up ground quickly, with the removal of the token system for 2017 helping performance to converge through the field.

“I think collectively we’ve helped with convergence in Formula 1 in the opening season, performance development through the year,” Cowell said.

“But then the opportunity to do a big change with Honda coming in, we all agreed that Honda could have that same opportunity to change everything in the first year and then the request came from manufacturers in addition to Honda saying ‘please can we take this crazy token table away because it’s bad for the sport?’

“It’s bad if somebody can’t train to get better and so we agreed, yeah, take the table away because it’s better for the sport because it means that you can innovate, you can introduce whatever you like.

“I think none of us should underestimate the technical prowess of Honda and of McLaren and I think my money is on that combination coming good and coming good pretty quickly. No pressure…”

Williams happy to ‘hold off’ on 2018 F1 driver decision

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Williams is happy to “hold off” on making a decision on its Formula 1 driver line-up for 2018 as it focuses on improving its on-track displays after a tough start to the season.

Williams currently fields Felipe Massa and Lance Stroll, a mix of experience and youth, but has failed to keep up with midfield front-runner Force India through the first half of the year.

Force India sits fourth in the constructors’ championship with more than double the points of Williams, who leads a tight-knit group down to Renault in eighth place, 15 points adrift.

While Stroll looks set to continue with Williams and Massa has hinted he may look to continue through to 2018 despite initially planning to retire at the end of last season, deputy team boss Claire Williams has confirmed that no decision about next year’s line-up will come any time soon.

“There’s a lot of talk already isn’t there, about drivers across the paddock. For us, we’ve decided we’re going to hold off a bit on our driver decision,” Williams said.

“We’ve got a fight on our hands on the race track at the moment and to be distracted by those kinds of conversations isn’t something that we want to be happening at the moment.

“[Force India’s] got a nice points haul on us at the moment we need to focus on, rather than anything else.”

Nico Rosberg visits Stanford University, considering study options

Getty Images
1 Comment

2016 Formula 1 world champion Nico Rosberg is considering study options at Stanford University after visiting the college earlier this week as part of his tour around California.

Rosberg sensationally announced his retirement from F1 just five days after winning his maiden world title last November, wanting to spend more time with his young family.

The German has been enjoying his retirement, recently embarking on a tour of Silicon Valley and California that saw him hold meetings with electric car giant Tesla, among other companies.

In a video posted to his Twitter account on Sunday, Rosberg spoke warmly about a visit to Stanford, revealing that he is considering some study options in the near future at the historic institution.

Rosberg was previously offered a scholarship to study engineering at Imperial College London when he was younger, only to turn it down in order to embark on a racing career. He also reportedly holds the highest ever score on Williams’ engineering aptitude test.

Should Nico sign up to a course at Stanford, we imagine he’d take things one class at a time…

How Formula E won motorsport’s race to New York City

FIA Formula E
1 Comment

RED HOOK, NY – Standing on the grid ahead of last Saturday’s Formula E race, it was difficult not to appreciate the enormity of the event that was taking place.

On a grid featuring 20 of motorsport’s top names, Moonlight star Naomie Harris, Hollywood power couple Catherine Zeta-Jones and Michael Douglas, and billionaire businessman Richard Branson, among others, you may have thought it was hard to know where to look.

But my eyes were firmly set on just one thing: the Manhattan skyline.

For that view had been the dream for a great number of racing series throughout the years. But it was finally happening.

Formula E had won the race to New York City.

THIRTY-FIVE YEARS IN THE MAKING

The idea to hold a motorsport event within the five boroughs was hardly a new one. Way back in 1982, Formula 1 announced plans to hold a race in New York for the 1983 season, identifying areas in Queens and Long Island as possible options, with an alternative being Meadowlands in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

“I’m delighted that at last this is going to happen in New York,” then-FOCA president and Brabham team owner Bernie Ecclestone said.

‘It’s happening 10 years later than it should have. The three proposed sites are all excellent, close to transportation and restaurants, a factor that was missing at Watkins Glen.”

The race ultimately never happened, although CART did manage to get to Meadowlands for 1984, the race lasting until 1991 when the money dried up and the fans stopped coming.

Another attempt to get a race in New York City itself followed, with an event on the streets of Manhattan planned for 1992. It was ultimately canned over a dispute between Marlboro owner Philip Morris, who was due to bankroll the race, and city mayor David Dinkins, the latter not willing to make concessions on his anti-tobacco advertising stance.

As Joseph Siano of the New York Times put it at the time: “Everyone who couldn’t believe there would ever be an Indy car race through the streets of Manhattan can keep on disbelieving.”

The disbelief continued through to 2010 when, now as F1’s ringmaster, Ecclestone announced plans for a ‘Grand Prix of America’ to be held at Port Imperial in New Jersey.

WEEHAWKEN, NJ – JUNE 11: Two-Time Defending Formula One World Champion Sebastian Vettel poses for a photo following a preview lap at Grand Prix of America at Port Imperial Course on June 11, 2012 in Weehawken, New Jersey. (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)

Launch events were held with the New York City skyline being the main attraction, with then-world champion Sebastian Vettel playing up the event. Future Indianapolis 500 winner Alexander Rossi even lapped around the proposed circuit, telling me back in 2013 that it was like “Monza on the city streets”.

But it all came to naught. Questions over funding led to delays and multiple postponements before the project ultimately faded away. The Circuit of The Americas in Austin, Texas ensured F1 had some kind of standing in the United States, the grand prix returning in 2012 and going from strength to strength. But a second race remained a dream that wasn’t coming to fruition anytime soon.

F1’s new owner, Liberty Media, has made its intentions clear when it comes to forming future calendars. New F1 CEO Chase Carey is keen on “destination cities”, with New York being high on his list, but the reality remains that staging a motor race in the city is a mammoth task.

But it is one that Formula E managed last weekend.

HOW DID THE RACE COME TO BE?

One of the newest championships established by the FIA back in 2014, the all-electric Formula E series has quickly become of significant interest for figures and manufacturers within motorsport.

Formula E stages events in cities – where electric cars are most needed – that bring the future of automotive technology to the masses. Beijing, London, Paris, Hong Kong and Buenos Aires are just five of the major locations the series has already visited, making New York a natural choice for series CEO Alejandro Agag.

“Alejandro came in to see me before season one, before they’d ever done a race. I’ve known of Formula E for quite some time,” explains Michael Hopper, a former sports commissioner for New York City and adviser to Formula E for the race, heading up its organization on the ground.

“There is no easy way to get an event of any size or stature done in New York. I was part of New York’s bid for the Super Bowl, and it took us a great many years to get that one here. It takes time, it takes a proven track record, and it takes some creativity by a lot of parties to get an event done for New York.

“So I know New York has always been near the top of Alejandro’s list after our initial meetings before season one. He always had a glimmer in his eye. He wanted to be here in New York.

“It’s a conversation we’ve had on and off through the years. When they started to look at season three and what that calendar would look like, it was time to add New York to that schedule.”

The ‘where’ had always been the problem with previous attempts to get a race in New York, but Red Hook emerged as a suitable location for a number of reasons, including the backdrop it offered.

“From the Statue of Liberty to New York harbor, Lower Manhattan and even downtown Brooklyn, there are portions along this course where you really have some amazing imagery where people really understand the location of where this race is,” Hopper explains.

“It only takes one picture or one image to know that is the skyline of Lower Manhattan, or the Brooklyn Bridge.

“Then from kind of a scheduling and disruption perspective, this area in Red Hook is a cruise terminal, that’s its normal operations, they’ve got cruises that go in and out of there every few weeks.

“So from a disruption standpoint, it actually provided us a really clear window to be able to do the works we needed, get the course prepared, do the race and move back out of there in a way that has a low impact on the business community, on the residential community, while really affording Formula E the ability to build a great, exciting course within the five boroughs of New York City.

“This isn’t one of the events where it takes place in New Jersey and they call it New York – this is New York City.”

NEW YORK, NY – JULY 15: Mitch Evans in the Jaguar I-TYPE during the New York City ePrix, ninth round of the 2016/17 FIA Formula E Series on July 15, 2017 in Brooklyn, New York City, NY, USA. (Photo by Andrew Ferraro/LAT Images)

The ease with which Formula E can get in and out without causing major disruption or any road closures was one benefit that Hopper thinks gave it an edge over a series such as F1 in the race to New York.

“I think there’s some differences in the series in general, whether it’s the length of the circuit, how many days you would need the circuit for,” Hopper says.

“Formula E’s schedule of practice, qualifying and the race all in one day is certainly an attractive proposition to different cities. And I think really when it comes down to it, the number one question you get from residents with a racing location such as either New Jersey or New York is the sound.

“I think that it’s a real leg up for Formula E when they start to branch out into other portions of their calendar to be able to provide the performance they do and the spectacle for the fans they do with that really limited introduction.”

THE REALITY OF RED HOOK

When it came to the race weekend itself, the on-track spectacle was an interesting one. The track layout itself was subject to private criticism from some of the drivers prior to the weekend, yet both races were filled with action.

The ease with which the Formula E paddock can be put together was obvious in Red Hook. The teams operated out of the usual tent garages, giving the pit lane a look like any other race. Fans were able to sample the eVillage, an important center for spectators on the race weekend with plenty of entertainment options, as well as checking out many of Red Hook’s offerings.

Red Hook itself was a curious mix of scruffy, degenerated streets and some up-and-coming new shops, pointing to the ongoing gentrification of the area. Something that really caught my eye was a Tesla dealership just a few blocks from the track, a nod to a message of sustainability that Hopper believes made Red Hook an ideal location for the race.

“If you think about Red Hook, it was a community that really suffered some damage or repercussions to the Hurricane Sandy that hit New York City a few years ago,” Hopper explains.

“That community is really at the forefront of thinking about sustainable energy, thinking about renewable infrastructure, and really hallmarks of Formula E.

“When you start to think about neighborhoods, if you pick any neighborhood in New York City to hold a Formula E race in, Red Hook would have already been near the top of that list. So I think it reflects the community really well.

“If you take a walk in Red Hook, a lot of the local businesses have had signage up in their windows promoting the race. There’s a gelato shop in Red Hook that created a specific flavor and named it after Formula E. There’s really cool local interest in it. They’ve bought in and want to be a part of it.”

Even when leaving the track and returning to Manhattan, Formula E’s presence was felt. The Empire State Building was lit up in the red and purple colors of the DS Virgin Racing team, an act that got tongues wagging an ocean away in the F1 paddock at Silverstone over the British Grand Prix weekend: “Why aren’t we doing that?”

NEW YORK, NY – JULY 16: Sam Bird (GBR), DS Virgin Racing, Spark-Citroen, Virgin DSV-02, and Felix Rosenqvist (SWE), Mahindra Racing, Spark-Mahindra, Mahindra M3ELECTRO, lead at the start of the race during the New York City ePrix, tenth round of the 2016/17 FIA Formula E Series on July 16, 2017 in Brooklyn, New York City, NY, USA. (Photo by Steven Tee/LAT Images)

But did it really feel like you were racing in New York City?

“Not at all. I just saw walls with the advertisements on, that was it,” said a to-the-point Jean-Eric Vergne after the first race on Saturday.

Alas, the enormity of racing in New York was not lost on all of the drivers, with Sam Bird – winner of both races – speaking particularly warmly about the event.

“The first thing to say is congratulations to everyone involved putting this event on. I can’t imagine how difficult it was to put this event on,” Bird said after his victory.

“It’s been an amazing week so far. It’s my first visit to New York, I thoroughly enjoyed it, and this race made it a lot better.”

The reality was that a race in Manhattan, while remaining the dream for any racing series, is not really viable. Red Hook offered a solution that, while still hard to pull off, was possible. The drivers on-track may not have felt like they were racing in New York once their visors were down, but few circuits on the Formula E calendar achieve that.

Those attending the event were under no illusions, though: all you had to do was gaze across the East River.

AN ELECTRIC FUTURE AND LEGACY

After working so hard to get a race in New York City, Formula E wasn’t going to let this be a one-and-done event. If it was going to roll into town, it needed to know that it could be a yearly visit.

“That was one of the main points of our conversations with the local authorities. We didn’t want this to be a one-off,” says Hopper.

“We wanted to make sure that Formula E would be in New York for a long time to come, and that is the scope of our agreement and our conversations, that this is going to become a fixture on the New York City calendar every summer.”

The location of the race is very helpful in making this happen. While a number of other cities that have hosted Formula E have faced pressure over the event and been forced to either relocate or, in London’s case, scrap the race altogether, the lack of disruption caused to Red Hook should prevent this happening.

Formula E is also looking to make a lasting legacy in the cities it visits. The New York City ePrix was the first event for the series that ran with zero-emissions, bringing clean, renewable energy to a major capital. The after-effects work for both the championship and, in Hopper’s eyes, the city too.

NEW YORK, NY – JULY 15: Sam Bird (GBR), DS Virgin Racing, Spark-Citroen, Virgin DSV-02. leads Daniel Abt (GER), ABT Schaeffler Audi Sport, Spark-Abt Sportsline, ABT Schaeffler FE02 during the New York City ePrix, ninth round of the 2016/17 FIA Formula E Series on July 15, 2017 in Brooklyn, New York City, NY, USA. (Photo by Sam Bloxham/LAT Images)

“I think when you think about the main points of Formula E’s brand, racing in city centres and racing in the biggest cities in the world is one of them, so New York needs to be on that list, so I’m glad that they’ve achieved that and they are going to be here for a while,” Hopper says.

“On the city side, I think there’s going to be a lot of interest in the electric vehicle portion of it from our local elected officials to community organizations, as well as a sustainability portion of it.

“Formula E’s goals to be carbon-neutral is really setting the standards for other US sports and New York sports and sports teams. So I think there are a lot of different takeaways that can come from both sides of this.”

From a racing point of view, though, history has already been made: Formula E has won the race to New York City.

“I give Alejandro a lot of credit on that,” Hopper says. “This has been a focus of his. From early on when we spoke, I think he understood what it was going to take to be able to get a race approved in New York City.

“He knew New York was where Formula E needed to be, and he’s made a lot of right steps and a lot of right decisions to be able to race here.”

Speaking after the race weekend, Agag made no secret of his pride of having got the race off the ground and finally managed what so many other series chiefs had tried and failed to do.

“Formula E has a habit of breaking new ground. This weekend in New York was yet another example of achieving what many thought was impossible,” Agag said.

“We managed to bring international open-wheel racing to New York for the first time in history, this is something that sets Formula E apart from any other series, bringing electrifying motorsport to the world’s leading cities.

“The race in New York was a defining moment in the series and years in the making. We worked tirelessly with the local authorities to find the right location. It couldn’t be Central Park and Liberty State Park wasn’t an option either.

“I actually thought it wasn’t going to happen, I didn’t lose hope but I wasn’t certain we’d get Formula E to New York… it hadn’t happened before in any form of open-wheel racing – then we found the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal. It was the most viable option and it also meant we didn’t need to close any streets.

“But, best of all, we still had the most spectacular view of New York. I had a similar feeling on the grid as at our first-ever race in Beijing. We’d done it, and the race proved to be a resounding success in front of a sell-out crowd.

“As the saying goes, if you can make it in New York, you can make it anywhere!”

Formula E may still be growing as a series, but its achievements last weekend must not be understated. Sure, it wasn’t the biggest global motorsport event in history, nor did it get its cars speeding around the streets of Manhattan.

But it broke ground and laid good foundations for the future. Formula E didn’t talk about having a race in New York City; it had an actual race in New York City.

Actions speak louder than words. And in the city that never sleeps, Formula E was able to make motorsport’s long-held dream a reality.