NASCAR’s first newspaper beat writer named Squier-Hall Award winner

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Tom Higgins, a Charlotte Observer reporter that is credited as the first newspaper beat writer to cover the entire NASCAR schedule, has been named the recipient of the 2015 Squier-Hall Award for NASCAR Media Excellence.

Higgins, who retired in 1997, will be honored during the 2015 NASCAR Hall of Fame induction ceremonies on Jan. 30 and be part of an exhibit in the Hall of Fame.

He was part of a group of eight nominees that were up for the Squier-Hall Award, which is named for NASCAR broadcasting legends Ken Squier and Barney Hall.

While beginning his career in 1957 with the Canton (N.C.) Enterprise, Higgins started covering motorsports as a writer for the Asheville (N.C.) Times. In 1964, he moved to the Observer to cover the outdoors, but soon started to follow the stock car circuit as well.

“Tom Higgins helped establish what it means to be a NASCAR beat reporter,” said NASCAR Chairman and CEO Brian France in a statement. “For more than five decades, his words have told the story of NASCAR, and the people and emotions that define the sport.

“He has been much more than a reporter to those in the NASCAR industry – serving as friend and confidant to competitors, administrators and his fellow journalists.”

Higgins is also a recipient of multiple other awards pertaining to racing media, including the International Motorsports Hall of Fame’s Henry T. McLemore Award (1980) and the NMPA’s George Cunningham Award (1987). Additionally, he was NASCAR’s Bill France Award of Excellence winner in 1996.

These days, Higgins continues to write columns on motorsports from the nostalgia perspective for both the Observer and its racing site, ThatsRacin.com.

F1 2017 driver review: Nico Hulkenberg

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Nico Hulkenberg

Team: Renault
Car No.: 27
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 0
Best Finish: P6 (Spain, Great Britain, Belgium, Abu Dhabi)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 43
Championship Position: 10th

Expectations were hard to peg for Renault heading into its second full season back in F1 with a factory team, but Nico Hulkenberg was surely expected to be the man spearheading its charge.

With teammate Jolyon Palmer severely underperforming, Hulkenberg did exactly that, bringing home all but 14 of the team’s points in the final standings. However, consistency was never something he truly found.

Many of Renault’s issues were down to reliability issues, sidelining Hulkenberg for six races – four coming in a five-race stint from Singapore to Mexico – yet he only scored points in consecutive races on three occasions.

When Hulkenberg and Renault were on form, they proved to be a potent combination, often topping the midfield fight and even looking faster than Force India come the end of the season. His run to sixth at the final race in Abu Dhabi was crucial for the constructors’ championship as Renault jumped Toro Rosso, securing an extra slice of prize money in the process.

But for a driver who was so often tipped as being a future star in F1, Hulkenberg still has a lot to prove. Renault is set to offer a good platform for the German moving forward with factory support, yet if he cannot beat new teammate Carlos Sainz Jr. through 2018, concerns will surely be raised.

Season High: Charging to sixth in Abu Dhabi despite a penalty.

Season Low: A tough run to 16th in Malaysia.