Britain F1 GP Auto Racing

British GP Paddock Notebook – Saturday

Leave a comment

We couldn’t really go to England without it raining, could we? Intermittent showers played a big part during the F1 running today at Silverstone, with qualifying being one of the most interesting of the season as a result.

It did little to change the final result though. Once again, it was advantage Mercedes as Nico Rosberg secured his fourth pole position of the season. The German driver bided his time in Q3 and made the most of the drying track to secure P1 by over 1.6 seconds.

It wasn’t all good news for the Silver Arrows as a mistake by Lewis Hamilton left him down in sixth, and the Briton faces an uphill struggle to cut the gap to Rosberg in the championship tomorrow.

Here are all of the reports, news and analysis from Silverstone today.

SESSION REPORTS

  • After a twelve-hour period of rain overnight, FP3 was a rather soggy affair. Mercedes chose not to run, allowing Sebastian Vettel to top a session for the first time in 2014.
  • The Silver Arrows reigned supreme once again in qualifying though (well, one of them did). Marussia was brilliant, Ferrari and Williams rubbish, and Sauber – despite crashing both cars – matched its best qualy of the year.

NEWS FROM THE PADDOCK

THOUGHTS FROM THE TRACK

There’s nothing quite like a bit of rain to spice things up in Formula 1. Qualifying today was meant to be a straight fight between the two Mercedes drivers for pole position once again, but Lewis Hamilton’s certainty that the track was too wet proved to be a costly one. Rosberg went for it and stormed to pole position by 1.6 seconds; Hamilton will start sixth.

This is not the first time that Hamilton has made a mistake in qualifying, though. In Austria, the Briton pushed too hard on both of his hot laps and failed to post a time, leaving him down in ninth. Although he did manage to fight his way back through the field to finish second, this mistake did appear to cost him a real shot at catching teammate Nico Rosberg.

Today, it was simply a misjudgement. Hamilton believed that the track was not improving, so bailed on his lap. The other drivers kept pushing, and even though the first sector was indeed wetter (very few improved their times in S1), the final two had dried out considerably – so much so that Rosberg’s lap was over 3.5 seconds quicker than Hamilton’s.

Praise must be heaped upon the drivers that make up the Mercedes sandwich. Sebastian Vettel matched his best qualifying result of the season in second place, whilst Jenson Button put on a show for the home fans in third ahead of Nico Hulkenberg and McLaren teammate Kevin Magnussen. Hamilton will have a tough job from P6, but the spirit of 2008 will reverberate around the grandstands at Silverstone.

The real stars were at Marussia, though. Jules Bianchi and Max Chilton perfected the timing of their Q1 laps to get through inside the top ten, but it didn’t stop there. Ferrari junior Bianchi finished a brilliant 12th with Chilton an equally-excellent P13, although he does drop down three places due to a grid penalty.

As for Ferrari and Williams, qualifying was nothing short of disastrous. All of the drivers dropped out in Q1 after badly mistiming their laps, and although some positions are made up because of penalties for Chilton, Gutierrez and Maldonado, neither team was at all pleased with the result. It will be great to see cars capable of making the podium charging through the field, though.

The weather in Britain is far from reliable, but today that was a good thing. Come rain or shine on race day though, it should be a thrilling GP tomorrow.

You can watch the British Grand Prix live on CNBC from 7:30am ET tomorrow morning.

Sirotkin enjoys strong first Renault F1 practice outing

Sergey Sirotkin (RUS) Renault Sport F1 Team RS16 Test Driver.
Russian Grand Prix, Friday 29th April 2016. Sochi Autodrom, Sochi, Russia.
© Renault Sport
Leave a comment

Sergey Sirotkin’s first Formula 1 practice run-out for Renault on Friday in Sochi proved to be a successful one as he finished eight-tenths of a second quicker than full-time driver Jolyon Palmer.

It was announced earlier this week that GP2 race winner Sirotkin had joined Renault in the role of test driver for the 2016 season, and would take part in FP1 for his home race in Russia in place of Kevin Magnussen.

Sirotkin posted a quickest lap time of 1:40.898 around the Sochi Autodrom in his first run in the Renault R.S.16 car to finish the session 13th overall, eight-tenths clear of Palmer.

The Russian’s time was made all the more impressive by the fact he had a problem with his seat position in the car throughout the session.

“My target for today was to give the team exactly what they wanted from the session,” Sirotkin said.

“I tried to remain very calm even though it is, of course, very exciting to get to drive a Formula 1 car. Obviously, it’s always beneficial when your lap time looks good but I felt comfortable delivering at today’s level even if it wasn’t as comfortable as it could have been with my seat.

“I am happy that I have started this long programme with Renault Sport Formula One Team in a positive manner.”

Renault trackside operations manager Alan Permane was happy with Sirotkin’s efforts, and felt that the team had made a fair start to the race weekend in Sochi.

“A productive first day for us. It was Sergey’s first time in the car and he did a very positive job for us,” Permane said.

“We weren’t able to get the seating position perfect for him yet despite this he delivered good pace and feedback.

“Jolyon had a straight-forward couple of sessions concentrating on aero development in the first session and a further front wing back-to-back comparison as well as tyre work in the afternoon.

“Kevin didn’t suffer from missing FP1 and was able to deliver everything required from FP2. We’ve still got some work to do, in particular with an oversteer balance.

“There are improvements possible, but it’s a reasonable start to the weekend.”

Luckless Bottas confident form will improve soon

during practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Russia at Sochi Autodrom on April 29, 2016 in Sochi, Russia.
© Getty Images
Leave a comment

Valtteri Bottas is confident that he will bounce back from a luckless start to the 2016 Formula 1 season sooner rather than later.

Bottas entered 2016 hopeful of continuing Williams’ impressive recent form that saw the team finish third in the constructors’ championship for the past two years.

However, while teammate Felipe Massa has managed to battle up the order to sit sixth in the drivers’ championship with 22 points after three races, Bottas has finished no higher than eighth, picking up just seven points in the same period.

Bottas is confident that his luck will turn soon though, and believes that he is still driving well despite his disappointing start to the year.

“The first two races were really unlucky,” Bottas told the official F1 website. “I drove well but fortune wasn’t on my side. It is never a good feeling when you drive well but don’t get the results, but at least you know you’ve given your best.

“In Melbourne, I had the penalty for the gearbox and that ruined my race a bit. In Bahrain I had a collision with Lewis Hamilton and had damage on the car which affected the whole race. And in China again damage on the car before my last stint and cost me three tenths of a second per lap.

“So here we are! But believe me, luck will turn. I know myself: I am driving well, I know what I am capable of, so I will stay consistent and wait for my opportunity.”

Bottas was linked with a move to Ferrari for much of 2015, but talk of a move away from Williams has cooled in light of Max Verstappen’s impressive rookie season and Romain Grosjean’s move to Haas for 2016.

The Finn is not bothered about driver market speculation though, saying that it is normal for people in F1 to doubt ability in a tough patch of form.

“One day you’re hot, next day you’re not,” Bottas said.

“People do have very short memories here in terms of what happens, but I think there are also people who really do understand F1, who can look behind the scenes and understand why a driver hasn’t had the results they should.

“For me, yes it’s not been the best start to the season, but I know there will be enough chances to shine. I’m ready for that.”

Vettel hit with five-grid spot penalty for gearbox change

during practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Russia at Sochi Autodrom on April 29, 2016 in Sochi, Russia.
Getty Images
2 Comments

Sebastian Vettel’s weekend in Sochi didn’t start off particularly strong anyway with both he and Scuderia Ferrari teammate Kimi Raikkonen changing their internal combustion engines.

It got worse once Vettel stopped on course during this morning’s second free practice, which brought out a virtual safety car period.

Vettel’s reported electronics issues are now worse than they appeared.

The FIA has confirmed Vettel’s team will change the gearbox on his car, and as such, that will saddle the four-time World Champion with a five-spot grid penalty.

It was later diagnosed, per multiple reporters in Sochi, that Vettel’s damage was caused from his contact with teammate Kimi Raikkonen in Shanghai.

Best case would mean Vettel would start sixth for Sunday’s Russian Grand Prix if he captured the pole position, but if he was to qualify off the front row, it will more likely mean he’d start eighth or worse.

“Looks like we had an electric problem, but I am sure we can fix it,” Vettel said. “Still, it is a shame, because now we are lacking some laps, especially in the long runs on race trims, which would have allowed us to see how competitive we are.

“But Kimi did the homework for the team, so it is not too bad. Also, here in Russia we know roughly what to expect. I think we can still learn a lot from what other people did. In qualifying trim we still have some stuff to improve.

“I think the car was getting better though. The track was quite dirty in the morning and then during the day it came more towards us. I felt happier as the day continued, it’s true that for the race we are lacking a bit of information, but we will see tomorrow morning, when we have another practice session.”

Vettel was second in this morning’s FP2 before stopping on course out of the final turn, which caused an early end to his session.

FIA confirms 2017 to 2020 set of engine regulations

SOCHI, RUSSIA - APRIL 29: Daniil Kvyat of Russia driving the (26) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer on track during practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Russia at Sochi Autodrom on April 29, 2016 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Dan Istitene/Getty Images)
Getty Images
1 Comment

The FIA has confirmed the regulations governing the 2017 to 2020 power units, following an agreement reached between the governing body, the four power unit manufacturers and the Commercial Rights Holder.

With the agreement reached by the World Motor Sport Council, these regulations will be included in the Technical and Sporting Regulations starting in 2017 and 2018.

Cost cutting is the primary objective of the new regs, although it’s one of four key areas outlined within the regulations. The others are supply, performance convergence and sound.

The cost cutting element first: in 2017, the power unit price for customer teams will be reduced by €1 million per season compared to 2016.

That’s the first step towards an even further reduction in 2018, with the annual supply cost to be reduced by a further €3 million.

The regulations seek to reduce the number of power units used per driver per season. Currently, the allowed number is four, with penalties coming into play if or when drivers exceed that number at a given point.

Supply is the next objective outline, with the regulations stating that the homologation will include an “obligation to supply” if a team were to face an absence of supply.

This hasn’t been an issue this year but could have propped up had Red Bull not got its own deal sorted. The key difference in phrasing is here is “obligation” and not “disagreement with supply.” The team has extended with its rebadged TAG Heuer (nee Renault) engines this year.

When we get to performance convergence, the token system for upgrades will be removed for 2017. Previously, each manufacturer had been allowed a certain number over the course of the year.

Finally on the sound component, the statement from the FIA reads: “Manufacturers are currently conducting a promising research programme into further improving the sound of the current power units, with the aim of implementation by 2018 at the latest.”

The 1.6L V6 turbos introduced in 2014 came under a fair bit of scrutiny for being quieter than the previous generation 2.4L V8s normally aspirated engines that ran through 2013. But there have been changes in pitch this year in particular and they’re on their way to being a more pleasing sound – all depends on the ear of course.

The 2017 regulations have been a hot topic this weekend in Sochi as the regulations were meant to be sorted in February, but delayed until the end of April. Figure there should be more to come with regards to the technical regulations in the coming days, if not hours.