Coke Zero 400 at Daytona postponed to tomorrow morning at 11 a.m. ET

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Steady rains this afternoon and early evening have forced NASCAR to postpone tonight’s Coke Zero 400 at Daytona International Speedway. The 160-lap, 400-mile race will instead go off tomorrow morning at 11 a.m. ET with TNT and the Motor Racing Network retaining TV and radio broadcast coverage.

According to Daytona International Speedway, parking lots for fans attending the race will open at 7 a.m. ET and the gates to the track will open at 9 a.m. ET.

Inclement weather moved into the Daytona Beach region this afternoon and caused the track to deploy its Air Titan and jet dryer units. However, as the rain continued, the dryers were told to stop and the originally scheduled green flag time of 7:57 p.m. ET was quietly scratched.

During the 8 o’clock hour, drying resumed again along the 2.5-mile oval in the event of a break in the weather that might have enabled NASCAR to get the race in. But at that time, pessimism appeared to be setting in.

Before NASCAR made the call to postpone the race, its vice president of operations, Steve O’Donnell, admitted that the chances of racing tonight were “not looking good” on his Twitter account:

Additionally, Dale Earnhardt Jr. – who is seeking to become the sixth Sprint Cup driver in history to sweep both Daytona races in the same year – was starting to plan on racing tomorrow.

Finally, a little before 9 p.m. ET, NASCAR decided that enough was enough for tonight. However, tomorrow’s forecast from the National Weather Service also calls for rain, with showers and thunderstorms likely coming after Noon ET.

The Coke Zero 400 now becomes the fourth Sprint Cup event in 2014 to be impacted by rain. A six-hour rain delay pushed the Daytona 500 to primetime, while two rain delays marred the Food City 500 in March at Bristol Motor Speedway. Then, in April, the Duck Commander 500 at Texas was postponed to the following Monday.

This weekend alone, rain has played a major role at Daytona. Both Nationwide and Sprint Cup Series qualifying sessions were cut short, and the start of last night’s Nationwide race was delayed by almost two hours before it was ran in its entirety.

David Gilliland will be on the pole for tomorrow’s race.

Raikkonen disappointed as strategy calls costs him shot at Monaco win

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Kimi Raikkonen was left disappointed following Sunday’s Monaco Grand Prix after Ferrari’s strategy call cost him a shot at his first victory for the Scuderia since 2009.

Raikkonen took his first pole for almost nine years on Saturday in Monaco and led the early part of the race from teammate Sebastian Vettel.

Ferrari pitted Raikkonen just before half distance, but opted to keep Vettel out as the German put in a series of quick laps to get the overcut on his teammate.

Vettel emerged from his stop ahead of Raikkonen on-track and retained his advantage to the checkered flag, clinching Ferrari’s first win in Monaco since 2001.

While P2 marked Raikkonen’s best result of the season so far, the Finn was careful with his words in the post-race podium interviews, his disappointment clear to see.

“Hard to say really,” Raikkonen said when asked how he was feeling.

“Obviously… you know it’s still second place, but it doesn’t feel awful good. This is how it goes sometimes.

“We go for the next race and try to do better. One of those days that you wish you had a bit more.”

Vettel calls Monaco win ‘very intense’, surprised by mid-race pace

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Sebastian Vettel admitted that he surprised himself with his mid-race pace during Sunday’s Monaco Grand Prix that proved instrumental in securing his third win of the 2017 Formula 1 season.

Vettel started second in Monaco and spent the first stint of the race trailing Ferrari teammate Kimi Raikkonen, with the gap hovering at around one second before the pit stop phase.

Raikkonen was brought in earlier than Vettel by Ferrari, freeing the German to put in a sequence of quick laps in clean air while his teammate toiled with traffic.

Vettel was able to pit a few laps later and emerge ahead of Raikkonen, having overturned the deficit before pushing on to create a gap of almost 10 seconds.

“I think it was a very, very intense race. I was hoping at the start to have a bit of a better launch, but Kimi had a good start, I had nowhere to go,” Vettel said.

“I had to be patient. There was a phase in the first stint where it was really tricky, the tires started to slide, I think you remember how it feels. It was quite uncomfortable. I think Valtteri [Bottas] and the pack was catching up a bit, we were facing some traffic.

“But then I had I don’t know, like a second attempt, a second set of tires. I had some laps where the car was really, really good. I pushed everything I had because I knew if there is a chance to win, then that’s it. So I was able to use that window and came out ahead.”

Vettel’s lead was wiped away by a late safety car, but the four-time world champion kept cool at the front on the restart to record his second Monaco victory, following his maiden success in 2011.

“After the restart it was really tricky with the cold tires, I think every one of us was struggling. Daniel [Ricciardo] said he brushed the wall on Turn 1 on the first lap,” Vettel said.

“So it was really, really difficult, but after a couple of laps I was able to get into control the gap behind.

“Fantastic job, the team has done really well. Great thanks to them and a fantastic weekend for Ferrari.”

Bourdais upbeat about recovery from Indy 500 qualifying injuries

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Sebastien Bourdais returned to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Sunday, just over one week following a savage crash in qualifying that saw him suffer multiple fractures to his pelvis and a fracture to his right hip.

In a press conference with members of the media, Bourdais expressed confidence about his recovery. “I’m doing good enough to be here. So that’s great!” he quipped. “It’s great to be out of the hospital environment. I’ve never really faced that before. It’s great to feel normal right now and to be able to walk around and see some familiar faces and see a lot of friends.”

Bourdais explained that his rehab process is still in its early stages, and that a lot of it is down to pain management. But, he does hope to be racing again before the season ends.

“It’s just going to be a long process. I can’t put any weight on my right leg for another five weeks. So it’s just going to be a game of patience and trying to make sure I’m ready when it matters. I’m shooting for the end of the season in Sonoma,” he explained.

Returning to the race track, particularly for Sunday’s 101st Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil, was also a critical aspect of rehabilitation, especially when it comes to overcoming mental and emotional hurdles. “For me, it’s just important to make sure that I stay in good spirits. Physically I’m doing well, and I have no intention to let this incident stop my career or anything,” he asserted.

The crash itself was one of the most frightening anyone has seen in quite some time, as he impacted the wall at a 45 degree angle while still traveling at well over 200 mph. And while safety is a constantly moving target, Bourdais was very complimentary of the current Dallara DW12 chassis, which prevented the injuries from being much more serious.

“The car did a really good job head-on,” he explained. “I don’t have any injuries on my feet or anything like that. But if we could avoid pelvis and hip fractures like that, that would be great. But I don’t think there are a lot of people who can say they have survived a head-on crash at 227. I don’t know that everybody knows, but I was still full throttle when I hit the wall. It’s a pretty good testament.”

In terms of the team’s future, owner Dale Coyne detailed that he has been in contact with several drivers about next week’s Chevrolet Detroit Grand Prix doubleheader, but no decision has been made. “We’ve probably had 25 drivers contact (us) for Detroit and on. Some usual names, and ones you may be surprised at. We’ll make that decision Monday or Tuesday,” Coyne said of the team’s future.

Bourdais, meanwhile, is anxious to get back as soon as he can, as he believes Dale Coyne Racing is building something special. “We’re building something at Dale Coyne Racing thanks to Dale and Gail and all the engineers and everybody who is hard at work, the mechanics and all. I think we have a great launching pad for the future, and I want to be part of that. That’s why I want to come back as soon as possible.”

 

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Late-race attrition adds twist to Monaco GP, six cars out in 20 laps (VIDEOS)

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Sebastian Vettel may have looked calm on the podium after clinching victory in Sunday’s Monaco Grand Prix, but some late-race drama caused by cars further back had put him under far greater pressure in the closing stages.

Vettel leapfrogged Ferrari teammate Kimi Raikkonen through the pit stops to take the lead of the race at half distance before surging 10 seconds clear.

However, Vettel’s lead was wiped away when the safety car was deployed following a clash between Jenson Button and Pascal Wehrlein at Portier, one of the tightest parts of the circuit.

Battling for 18th place, Button tried diving down the inside of Wehrlein, only for the pair to knock wheels and the German’s Sauber to tip in the air, coming to rest at a 90-degree angle up against the wall.

The incident sparked concern among the passing drivers, but Wehrlein soon reported to his team that he was OK, and simply could not get out of his car due to the position of the wall.

The Monegasque marshals were quick to come to Wehrlein’s aid and right his car before sending him off to the medical center for a check-up.

The incident acted as the first in a string of late drama that saw six cars drop out in the close 21 laps, with the safety car bunching the field and resulting in some desperate moves.

The next retirement came courtesy of Marcus Ericsson in one of the more embarrassing mistakes you will see in F1 this year as he crashed behind the safety car.

As a lapped car, Ericsson was given the wave-by to pass the safety car and try to unlap himself, only to duff his Sauber into the wall at Turn 1 in the process.

Turn 1 would claim another victim on the restart when Stoffel Vandoorne threw away McLaren’s chance to score its first points of the year. As Sergio Perez made a divebomb move up the inside, Vandoorne was unable to slow on the marbles and careered straight into the barrier, bringing his race to an end.

Perez continued to charge after passing Vandoorne, making an opportunistic move on Daniil Kvyat through La Rascasse. The pair made contact, leaving a hole in Kvyat’s sidepod and forcing the Russian driver to park up at Casino Square.

The final casualty of the race was Lance Stroll, who after reporting concerns with his brakes was seen being parked up in his garage with seven laps to go, extending the Canadian’s point-less start to life in F1.