Voting opens for NASCAR’s most popular driver; will Dale Jr. make it 12 years in a row?

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Will Dale Earnhardt Jr. be the fan’s choice as NASCAR’s most popular driver for the 12th consecutive year?

Or might Danica Patrick, newcomer Kyle Larson, six-time (potentially soon-to-be seven time?) Sprint Cup champion Jimmie Johnson or some other driver earn the honor of being the biggest fan favorite in racing in 2014?

We’ll find out in four months as voting began Saturday and will conclude Nov. 17 for the Sprint National Motorsports Press Association’s Most Popular Driver Award.

Now in its 62nd year of existence, the MPDA is one of the most noteworthy and popular awards because it allows racing fans a direct pipeline to show their support and loyalty to their favorite driver.

New for this season is sponsorship of the award by Sprint, which also is the sole sponsor of NASCAR’s Sprint Cup Series.

For more information and to cast your vote, visit www.MostPopularDriver.com.

Here’s the fine print: Fans are allowed to cast one ballot per email address per day. Fans can also cast up to two additional votes per person per email address on social media sites Facebook or Twitter.

Eligibility is open to drivers who have declared for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series championship and have entered all points-paying NASCAR Sprint Cup Series events contested between Jan. 1, 2014 and July 5, 2014.

The MPDA winner will be announced during NASCAR’s Champion’s Week at the annual Myers Brothers Luncheon in Las Vegas.

“We sincerely appreciate the interest expressed by so many fans surrounding the Most Popular Driver program,” NMPA president Kenny Bruce said in a press release. “Their continued participation, passion and loyalty are the reason for the program’s amazing success and longevity.”

More than one million votes were cast in last year’s contest. Bill Elliott holds the record by being chosen MPD 16 times.

Remember, to vote, visit www.MostPopularDriver.com.

As they say in Chicago, vote early and vote often.

* Disclosure: Jerry Bonkowski is a member of the board of directors of the National Motorsports Press Association.

Follow me @JerryBonkowski

Cooper solidifies PWC GT presence with Callaway Corvette

Callaway, Cooper, Gill. Photo: PWC
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Pirelli World Challenge could use a “face” of the series from a driving standpoint, and American Michael Cooper is a good candidate to fill that role for 2018.

Cooper, 27, has won PWC Touring Car, GTS and, most recently the SprintX GT titles within the series and has quickly blossomed into one of the series’ top GT stars.

It’s been a rapid rise for the Syosset, N.Y. native, entering into a world filled with series stars and champions such as Johnny O’Connell, Patrick Long, Alvaro Parente and a host of others.

But under O’Connell’s tutelage, Cooper admirably filled the rather gaping shoes vacated by Andy Pilgrim at Cadillac Racing, steering the Cadillac ATS-V.R to multiple race wins in the last two years – including a sweep of this year’s season finale weekend at Sonoma.

Cooper and Jordan Taylor were the model of consistency in SprintX this year, winning once at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park and surviving contact at Circuit of The Americas to take that title.

With Cadillac withdrawing its ATS-V.R program at the end of the year though, Cooper was left a free agent for 2018. Fortunately with one door closed another opened, in the form of the GM-blessed but full Callaway Competition USA effort with its Callaway Corvette C7 GT3-R that will come Stateside next year. Cooper and Daniel Keilwitz will be in the team’s two cars for the full season; the car was fully unveiled last week at the PRI Show in Indianapolis.

The Callaway is a proven commodity in Europe but couldn’t run in the U.S. unless the path was cleared by one of GM’s factory programs to end a direct, potential head-to-head competition.

Moving from the Cadillac to the Callaway Corvette should be a natural transition, Cooper said last week.

“It worked out incredibly well that GM decided to allow Calloway to run the car in the United States and it created an opportunity for me that wouldn’t have been there otherwise,” he told NBC Sports. “I talked to a lot of other GT teams and at the end of the day, I felt like this was the best direction for me to be competitive next year and to also continue furthering my career with General Motors.”

Indeed Cooper has graduated from the Blackdog Speed Shop Chevrolet Camaro Z/28.R in GTS to the Cadillac and now to the Callaway Corvette. Cooper hailed the Cadillac team for what they did for his career growth.

“Working with Cadillac Racing has been instrumental in developing my abilities both on and off the track,” he said. “So I’m definitely a much more well-rounded driver now and have a lot of experience in the World Challenge GT field, so I kind of know what to expect going into that first race and going into that first corner in St. Pete.”

As noted, the car’s success in Europe means it’s a well-oiled machine by the time Reeves Callaway has worked with PWC to bring it Stateside next year. And as Cooper explained, discussions had been underway for a bit of time to ensure his presence in this car and team.

“I think the car is going to be extremely capable. It’s already won championships and races in Europe. I think, in bringing it over here, we’re going to hit the ground running straight away,” he said.

“Calloway had wanted me to come drive for them in July or August. We always kept in touch since then, and there was a lot of work trying to put together a program before they decided that they were going to do a fully fledged factory program. So once they made that decision, I think the pieces were kind of in place already, and the conversations had been had to be able to say ‘You’re going to be our guy.’”

December is late for IMSA programs to get finalized, but it’s relatively early for PWC, with the season not starting until mid-March in St. Petersburg. An extensive testing program should follow, as Callaway establishes its U.S. base and infrastructure.

“It’s definitely early for a Pirelli World Challenge program to be announced in December when we start racing in March. So that’s very good,” he said. “But, the team has a lot of work ahead of them in terms of getting infrastructure set up here in the United States, because a lot of their racing program has been in Europe. So, there will be a testing program, but they have to get the infrastructure in place first. But, we’ll be well prepared for St. Pete, I’m certain of it.

“Last year was the first year when I could sit back, kick my feet up, and know what I was doing next year. So, to be able to have everything done and be able to announce it this early on makes my life less stressful and now I can just focus on preparing myself and my team for next year.”