Home hero Hamilton claims brilliant British GP victory

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SILVERSTONE, ENGLAND – Six years to the day after his first victory at Silverstone, Lewis Hamilton has won the British Grand Prix for the second time after teammate and championship rival Nico Rosberg retired from the race due to a gearbox problem.

In a race that was red flagged for almost an hour following a crash on the first lap, Hamilton fought his way up from sixth place on the grid to run second to Rosberg before the German driver retired with 22 laps remaining.

Valtteri Bottas backed up Williams’ great result in Austria with a mesmerising drive through the field, finishing second after starting way back down in 14th place. Red Bull’s Daniel Ricciardo perfected a one-stop strategy to finish the race in third place ahead of McLaren’s Jenson Button, who equalled his best ever result at Silverstone.

After the original start, everything quickly came to a halt when a huge accident involving Kimi Raikkonen and Felipe Massa brought out a red flag. The Finn touched the grass when coming onto the Wellington Straight, causing him to crash into the wall on the right hand side of the track with some force.

The car then careered back across the circuit, leaving Massa with nowhere to go despite his best efforts to avoid the Finn. Raikkonen limped away from the wreckage, and was transferred to the medical centre for examination where he was found to have nothing more than some bruising to his knee and ankle.

The stewards deployed the safety car at first, but then chose to stop the race due to the damage caused to the guardrail on the Wellington Straight. Amid the chaos, Max Chilton had pitted for repairs, but earned himself with a drive-through penalty for doing so after the race had been suspended.

The repair work to the barrier took almost an hour, but the race was then able to restart under the safety car with the drivers in the positions that they were upon the red flag.

Rosberg made a perfect restart to open up a four second gap over Button after the first green flag lap, but the big mover was Hamilton. The Briton dived past both of the McLarens within two laps of racing, and quickly set his sights on the other Silver Arrow at the front of the field.

Valtteri Bottas quickly made up for his poor qualifying result, charging through the field to rise to third place. Fernando Alonso looked to follow suit, but the Spaniard was hit with a five second stop-go penalty for starting out of position on the grid.

Esteban Gutierrez’s race came to an early end following a run-in with Pastor Maldonado. The two drivers made contact heading through the final complex of corners, tipping Maldonado up into the air in a near-reverse of the incident that we saw in Bahrain. Maldonado was able to continue, although he did lose three places as a result of the tangle.

At the front, Hamilton began to apply pressure to Rosberg by reducing the gap with each passing lap, and took the lead when his teammate pitted. The Briton was told that it was “hammer time”, and duly posted personal best times before stopping.

Having reported a gearbox problem earlier in the race, Rosberg’s car soon cried enough and came to a halt at Chapel. His futile efforts to restart the car did not work, meaning that for the first time in 2014, the German driver did not score any points.

Now leading, Hamilton was told to look after his car given that his advantage was over 25 seconds and growing. Once second-placed Bottas stopped for fresh rubber, the lead stood at over 40 seconds. The Finn was continuing to push though, and ran in a strong second place behind the sole remaining Mercedes.

Vettel and Alonso entered battle after the Red Bull driver made his second and final stop of the race, with the Spaniard pulling off a fine overtake heading into Copse. Vettel tried to respond, but could not find a way past Alonso who was running in fifth despite complaining about his defence over the radio.

With ten laps to go, Hamilton pitted for a fresh set of tires to make sure of the result, and crossed the line almost 30 seconds ahead of the field to claim an emotional home victory and bring himself right back into the championship fight. He now trails Rosberg by just four points at the top of the standings.

Bottas produced another sterling performance to score his best-ever result in Formula 1, finishing second. In the final few laps of the race, Button reeled in Ricciardo for the final podium position, but just could not quite catch the Red Bull driver.

Alonso and Vettel continued to fight, with the German driver eventually finding a way past with four laps to go to finish fifth behind Button. Kevin Magnussen came home in seventh ahead of Nico Hulkenberg, and the Toro Rosso drivers rounded out the points in ninth and tenth.

Hamilton’s victory sent the home crowd into raptures, but no-one was happier than the Briton himself. With this result, he has put the pressure right back on Rosberg, and will now want to take the lead of the championship on his teammate’s home turf at Hockenheim in two weeks’ time.

Michael Andretti looking forward to new Australian Supercars venture

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If it seems like Michael Andretti is out to conquer the world, he is – kind of.

The former IndyCar star turned prolific team owner has won three of the last four Indianapolis 500s and five overall, second only to Roger Penske’s 16 Indy 500 triumphs.

Along the way, in addition to expanding his own IndyCar and Indy Lights operation, the son of Mario Andretti and the primary shareholder of Andretti Autosport has also branched out into Global RallyCross and Formula E racing in recent years.

And now, Andretti has further expanded his brand internationally, following Penske to the world down under — as in the world of Australian V8 Supercars.

Andretti has teamed with Supercars team owner Ryan Walkinshaw, along with veteran motorsports marketer and executive director of McLaren Technology Group and United Autosports owner and chairman, Zak Brown.

Together, the three have formed Walkinshaw Andretti United, based in suburban Melbourne, Australia. The new team kicks off the new season with the Adelaide 500 from March 1-4.

“It’s just extending our brand and putting it out there,” Andretti told NBC Sports. “The Supercars are such a great series.

“It all started with Zach Brown calling me and said ‘You have to talk to Ryan Walkinshaw. He’s got something interesting to talk to you about.’

“We talked and literally in like a half-hour, we said, ‘Let’s figure out how we’re going to make this work.’ And then Zack was like, ‘Hey, what about me?’ And then Zack came in as a partner and it’s cool now that we have the Walkinshaw Andretti United team.

“I’m really excited about that program, the guys at the shop are excited about it, we’ve been doing a lot of things to try and help it because it’s such a cool series and the cars are so cool.

“I went down there to Bathurst, which was to me one of the coolest tracks in the world. I wish I could have driven it, I really do. It looks like a blast.

“It’s amazing how big that series is when you go down there. It’s one of the biggest sports in Australia. It was just a great opportunity for us to extend our portfolio.”

Admittedly, Andretti had some extra incentive to want to get involved in the Supercars world: Penske joined forces with legendary Dick Johnson Racing in September 2014.

The organization came together quickly and the rebranded DJR Team Penske went on to win the 2017 V8 Supercars championship.

“Roger was down there the last few years,” Andretti said, adding that fact as incentive to get his own organization into the series. “So it’s cool to go race head-to-head with Roger. That was also in the back of our minds.”

This is no start-up venture for Andretti. The roots of the new venture began in 1990 as the Holden Racing Team, which went on to become one of the most successful organizations in Australian V8 Supercar racing, having won the drivers’ championship six times and the Virgin Australia Supercars Championship’s top race, the Bathurst 1000 (essentially Australia’s version of the Indy 500), seven times.

Last season, Holden Racing team morphed into Triple Eight Race Engineering and was renamed Mobil 1 HSV Racing.

And now the company has been renamed once again for the 2018 campaign under the Walkinshaw Andretti United banner.

The team will be composed of two Holden ZB Commodores with drivers James Courtney and Scott Pye, as well as a Porsche 911 GT3-R in the Australian GT championship.

What’s next for Andretti’s motorsports portfolio? Right now, it’s pretty full, but you can bet running for championships from Australia (Supercars) to globally (GRC) to Indianapolis (Indy 500) to the U.S. (Verizon IndyCar Series) are at the top of this year’s list.