PoconoStart

Ten with Townsend: Pocono Debrief

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Following Sunday’s Pocono INDYCAR 500 fueled by Sunoco on NBCSN, won by Juan Pablo Montoya, MotorSportsTalk checks in with NBCSN IndyCar analyst Townsend Bell for the latest installment of “Ten with Townsend.”

Between commentary, his Indianapolis 500 race experience and his regular commitments in the TUDOR United SportsCar Championship, it’s been a busy year for Townsend, and we thank him for his time and insights post-Pocono. For an archive of all “Ten with Townsend” posts, click here.

 

-You’d said earlier this year Juan Pablo Montoya was methodically coming back to form but not there yet. Did you think when he did get back on form it would be at this point in the year, or more toward the end of the year?

It seems like a reasonable point based on his experience and world-class talent.  Now the question is when can he perform like that on a street circuit, short oval, or permanent road course.  He was patient, precise and aggressive at all the right times today.  Wins on the other disciplines are probably not far off.

-How does Will Power keep his head in the game given this series of penalties he’s triggered? Does he have anyone but himself to blame?

He’s fun to watch because he’s so committed to winning every lap, every session, but that is also what seems to trip him up so frequently.  At this point he needs a dramatic re-think in his approach so as to minimize his exposure to penalties.  I think Tim Cindric is an important part of coaching Will out of the hole he’s in. It’s an interesting challenge to harness the greatest talent in the series right now.

If I look at others to take the blame…the more I think about it, it’s really all Paul Tracy’s fault.

-Were you surprised he came after you guys in the booth post-race, or do you think that was just heat of the moment frustration knowing he’d lost the points lead and shot at another win?

Weird but a good laugh at the same time!  I’m only 32nd in points but in his dome.  How cool is that!?

-Did you like Tony Kanaan’s strategy this race of going for it every stint rather than opting to fuel save?

Well he started off going for it, then tried to nurse it but that wasn’t working so he had to go for it again but it was too late. Sometimes those strategies just don’t work out.  I’m sure TK wishes he and his engineers could have a re-do. He had the outright pace to beat anyone at Pocono.

-Did Helio Castroneves’ bounce back this race impress you after his Houston accident? 

Not really.  He’s a contender year in and year out, race in and race out.  Total pro.

-Who do you think has the mental edge between Power and Helio at Team Penske? Do you think JPM is getting to either or both of them? 

Helio is super focused (always) under that bubbly exterior and not nearly as rattled as Will when things go wrong.  JPM is simply having fun with none of the pressure the other 2 are dealing with – he could very well be in the mix at Fontana too!  The other question is…with all 3 of his drivers in the top 4 in points right now…can RP finally see a championship delivered this season?

-The rest of the field: Surprises and disappointments at Pocono. 

My surprise was (rookie Mikhail) Aleshin racing superbly on a track he had never seen…after just 2 short practice sessions.

Disappointments:  I was feeling for (Jack) Hawksworth and (Bryan) Herta after a tough hit in practice.

-Having had the chance to race Indianapolis, but then watch/call Pocono, how differently do you think Pocono played out in terms of the race flow? 

It was more ‘strategic’ than Indy with everyone cruising for the first 150 laps to save fuel.  Watching the final restart though with everyone fanning out (Aleshin was almost in the paddock!) was pretty wild.

-You hadn’t been to Pocono previously. What did you make of the facility, crowd, event atmosphere and race itself? 

I thought the track was super unique (this was my first time there).  The crowd and event atmosphere has plenty of room to grow.

– How did you enjoy calling the race with Bob Varsha and Paul Tracy? How has PT developed in just a few races in the booth this season? 

I really enjoyed it with Bob and PT.   Bob is so polished and effortless with his delivery.  My first U.S. broadcasting job (F1 on SPEED) was under his command so it was nice to work with him again.

PT has more winning expertise than anyone to ever sit in that chair so I try to listen and learn as much as I can.  He also makes me laugh in so many ways he doesn’t realize.  I particularly enjoyed watching him squirm as I learned Pocono with the Z28 in a single flying lap after dealing with his mild culinary freak-out when I ventured into the hood Saturday night in search of good food.

source:
Townsend Bell (center) flanked by Bob Varsha and Paul Tracy.

Ed Carpenter Racing reveals Preferred Freezer liveries for May

driver of the XXX during the Phoenix Grand Prix at Phoenix International Raceway on April 2, 2016 in Avondale, Arizona.
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With the calendar shifted over to May, Ed Carpenter Racing has taken the wraps off its pair of Preferred Freezer Services Chevrolets for the pair of Verizon IndyCar Series races at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Josef Newgarden’s No. 21 car shifts from the 100th anniversary special commemorative livery for Fuzzy’s Vodka to a primarily blue with white trim PFS entry.

Meanwhile JR Hildebrand, who has had the PFS colors each of the last two years at Indy, will continue in the standard white with blue trim No. 6 car. Hildebrand will run at both the Angie’s List Grand Prix of Indianapolis and the 100th Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil.

Ocon set for Spanish GP practice run-out with Renault

Esteban Ocon (FRA) Renault Sport F1 Team Test Driver.
Formula One Testing, Day 1, Tuesday 1st March 2016. Barcelona, Spain.
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Defending GP3 Series champion Esteban Ocon will take part in practice for the Spanish Grand Prix next month for Renault.

Ocon, 19, rose to attention in 2014 when he won the FIA F3 European Championship ahead of current Toro Rosso driver Max Verstappen.

The Frenchman took part in practice for Lotus in Abu Dhabi that year, and became a member of Mercedes’ development programme in 2015 en route to winning the GP3 title.

Ocon has been loaned to Renault for the 2016 season, with whom he works as reserve driver, and he will now take part in first practice for the Spanish Grand Prix on May 13.

McLaren now targeting regular points after double score in Sochi

SOCHI, RUSSIA - MAY 01: Fernando Alonso of Spain driving the (14) McLaren Honda Formula 1 Team McLaren MP4-31 Honda RA616H Hybrid turbo on track during the Formula One Grand Prix of Russia at Sochi Autodrom on May 1, 2016 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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McLaren drivers Fernando Alonso and Jenson Button are now targeting regular top-10 finishes after scoring their first points of the season in Sunday’s Russian Grand Prix.

McLaren arrived in Sochi with just a single point to its name so far in 2016 courtesy of Stoffel Vandoorne, who deputized for the injured Alonso in Bahrain.

Alonso and Button missed out on a place in Q3 on Saturday, but both ran trouble-free races en route to sixth and tenth place respectively.

The result marked not only the first points of the year for both drivers, but just the second time that McLaren had got both of its cars to the line inside the top 10 since it rekindled its partnership with Honda at the start of the 2015 Formula 1 season.

“We were lucky in Turns 2 and 3 on the opening lap – due to those accidents, we were able to gain some places for free,” Alonso said.

“But, as we saw last year, we can make a good start but then not be able to maintain those strong starting positions. This year, it’s different, we have the pace. To finish sixth, and set the fifth-fastest lap, shows that our car is still gaining pace.”

Alonso was left to run quite a lonely race to P6, but did take one lap late on to turn the engine up to full power and have some fun by stretching the legs of the McLaren MP4-31.

“The car felt good all race. Obviously, we were saving fuel at some points of the afternoon, but, on one lap, I just decided to go for it – to wake myself up a little bit! – and the lap-time showed the potential is there,” Alonso said.

“Finishing in the points should be our regular target from now on.”

Button managed to take P10 from Carlos Sainz Jr. late on to complete an impressive fightback and score his first point since last year’s United States Grand Prix.

“To get both cars home in the points, and at a track which we didn’t feel would really suit our package, is a fantastic result for the whole team,” Button said.

“As the pack dived into Turn 2, I had to back off because it was mayhem. The bollard at Turn 2 is the problem at the start because people are trying to fight through Turns 2 and 3. I think that needs some looking at.

“From there, I was disadvantaged, but the pace was in the car. After that, it was just a case of fighting my way back – which I really enjoyed. It’s difficult to overtake around here, but I was able to make a few moves and enjoy myself.

“I think the next race in Barcelona will be reasonably difficult for us, but there’s no reason not to look forward to targeting another points haul in Monaco.”

Magnussen scores breakthrough points for Renault in Russia

during the Formula One Grand Prix of Russia at Sochi Autodrom on May 1, 2016 in Sochi, Russia.
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Kevin Magnussen believes that his charge to seventh place in Sunday’s Russian Grand Prix was no less than Renault deserved as he score its first points since its return to Formula 1 as a constructor in 2016.

Renault last raced in F1 with its own team back in 2010 before taking over the Lotus operation at the end of last year.

The French manufacturer has said that 2016 is very much a year of rebuilding, yet the chiefs were known to be disappointed with its point-less start to the season.

Magnussen made the most of a messy start to charge from 17th on the grid to eventually finish the race seventh, marking Renault’s first F1 points as a constructor since the 2010 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix.

The result was also Magnussen’s first top 10 finish since the 2014 Brazilian Grand Prix when he finished ninth for McLaren.

“Feels good. It’s nice to finally get points on the board, and not even just one,” Magnussen told NBCSN after the race.

“I’m really happy. I think the whole team deserves it after the hard work and tough races. We have points on the board now, so it gives us a bit of a boost.”

Magnussen made up a number of positions on the first lap when a number of drivers got caught up in incidents before maintaining his placing throughout the race.

“First lap was really messy, we knew it would be difficult with something like that,” Magnussen said.

“Everyone was spinning and hitting the wall. I went outside all the front wings. But we made it up just before Turn 1 and 2, and gained it back into Turn 3. The guys in front didn’t finish.

“In the end of the day, a bit lucky but we made the best of it and we deserved.”