IndyCar: Montoya’s surge leads post-Pocono stats of note


Just as we did post-Houston, here are some intriguing stats gleaned from digging into the numbers post-Sunday’s Pocono INDYCAR 500 fueled by Sunoco for the Verizon IndyCar Series:

  • Pocono winner Juan Pablo Montoya is the eighth different winner in 11 races. Two more makes 10 to tie the 2013 mark, with seven races to go.
  • Montoya has also recorded four top-10 finishes in a row, the longest active streak in the series, as he’s up to fourth in the championship. He and Team Penske teammate Helio Castroneves now have first, second and third-place finishes this year; Will Power is yet to finish third.
  • Here’s another Montoya stat: He’s the top-scoring driver in the championship since Round 6 at Detroit. Montoya has accrued 239 points in the last six races, with Castroneves second (226) and Power third (212) for a Team Penske 1-2-3 run. Simon Pagenaud (fourth, 191) is next up ahead of rookies Carlos Munoz (fifth, 180) and Mikhail Aleshin (sixth, 167). In the last six races, Indianapolis 500 champ Ryan Hunter-Reay has only the 16th most points scored (114).
  • Oval and road/street course championships aren’t awarded as they were for a couple seasons, but it’s still interesting to note who’s excelled at what discipline. Castroneves (222 oval points, 224 road/street course points) has the best points balance across the two disciplines; Power, Pagenaud and Hunter-Reay have been more skewed towards the road/street courses (276, 246 and 227 to rank first, second and third there; they have 170, 156 and 161 points on ovals to rank fourth, sixth and fifth there). Castroneves (222), Montoya (220) and Munoz (186) are the top three points scorers on ovals; fittingly, they’re the only three with top-five finishes in both 500-mile races.
  • Ryan Briscoe became the 20th different driver to record a top-five finish in 2014 with fourth place on Sunday. There were 20 different podium finishers in 2013; thus far, there’s been 16 different drivers in the top three in 11 2014 races.
  • There was not much in the way of points movement on Sunday in terms of position changes. Briscoe gained four positions (13th to ninth), Aleshin three (16th to 13th). Hunter-Reay, Sebastien Bourdais, James Hinchcliffe, Justin Wilson, Takuma Sato and Jack Hawksworth all lost two spots.
  • Podium stats! After scoring seven of the first 15 available podium positions in five races, Andretti Autosport has just two of the last 18 available over six races. Munoz achieved both. Meanwhile Team Penske has gone from five podiums in the first five races to eight in the last six. No other team has more than two podium finishes over the last six races (last six races: Penske 8, Andretti 2, Ganassi 2, Schmidt Peterson 2, Herta 1, Coyne 1, Carpenter 1, Rahal 1).
  • Yes, Pocono offered double points, but Josef Newgarden still made up a bag of points in this one race. With 49 points for eighth place on Sunday, Newgarden scored only three points fewer on Sunday than he had in the previous four races – combined. Finishes of 17th, 11th, 20th and 20th netted him only 52 points in that four-race run from Detroit Race 2 through Houston Race 2.
  • How crucial have the double points races been? Just look at how the results have impacted the championship. The five drivers who have two top-10s at both Indianapolis and Pocono (Montoya, Castroneves, Munoz, Power and Marco Andretti) all sit in the top-10 in points. The drivers without a top-10 on either (Hinchcliffe, Wilson, Sato, Hawksworth, Tony Kanaan, Charlie Kimball, Sebastian Saavedra, Graham Rahal and Carlos Huertas) all sit outside the top-10 in points.
  • Ganassi posted its second double top-five result of the season on Sunday. Through 11 races though, they only have one double top-five qualifying effort, and a single front row start (Kanaan second at St. Petersburg). Team Penske and Andretti Autosport don’t have many either, with each having three double top-five qualifying efforts this season.
  • Pagenaud outqualified Aleshin at Pocono, going back on top after Aleshin’s runner-up grid position at Houston Race 2. Pagenaud leads the head-to-head qualifying vs. his Schmidt Peterson Motorsports teammate 10-1. But with the 11th place in Pocono qualifying, Pagenaud started outside the top 10 for the first time since Round 6 at Detroit Race 1.

Lorenzo looking to Honda, Ducati for help in MotoGP title race

ALCANIZ, SPAIN - SEPTEMBER 27:  Jorge Lorenzo of Spain and Movistar Yamaha MotoGP celebrates the victory on the podium at the end of the MotoGP race during the MotoGP of Spain - Race at Motorland Aragon Circuit on September 27, 2015 in Alcaniz, Spain.  (Photo by Mirco Lazzari gp/Getty Images)
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Jorge Lorenzo hopes that he can get some help from the Honda and Ducati riders in his championship battle with Yamaha teammate Valentino Rossi in the final four races of the 2015 MotoGP season.

Lorenzo currently trails Rossi by 14 points at the top of the riders’ championship, and with just four races to go, barring an unlikely run of results, the title will go to a Yamaha rider for the first time since 2012.

The formbook offers little in the way of clues for the Lorenzo/Rossi battle, for although Lorenzo has won more races, Rossi has been more consistent, finishing off the podium just once this season.

Lorenzo had hoped to reel Rossi in last time out at Motorland Aragon, but the Italian rider managed to finish third, minimizing the damage of his teammate’s victory.

Nevertheless, Lorenzo was pleased to bounce back after two disappointing races at Silverstone and Misano, having lost ground on Rossi in the title race.

“I am very happy with this victory because it came after two races that were a bit disappointing and I expected to take more points, but due to a few factors and especially the weather, I failed to achieve the desired result,” Lorenzo said. “The victory in Motorland [Aragon] was crucial.”

Rossi was beaten to second place by Honda’s Dani Pedrosa after a titanic battle in the closing stages of the last race, and Lorenzo hopes that the Spaniard, among others, could aid his cause inadvertently again in the remaining four races.

“[Pedrosa] was very strong and it was useful to recover the points lost earlier and it has given me more chances to recover with four races left until the end,” Lorenzo said.

“But [Marc] Marquez or maybe the two Ducati riders could also stand in front of Valentino and take away some points. It is a real possibility, but very dangerous for us both.”

The next round of the MotoGP season takes place at Motegi, Japan next weekend.

Steiner: Haas F1 Team could not afford rookie mistakes

KANNAPOLIS, NC - SEPTEMBER 29:  (L-R) Gunther Steiner, team principal of Haas F1 Team, Romain Grosjean of France, and Gene Haas, owner of Haas F1 Team, pose for a photo opportunity after Haas F1 Team announced Grosjean as their driver for the upcoming 2016 Formula 1 season on September 29, 2015 in Kannapolis, North Carolina.  (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Stewart-Haas Racing via Getty Images)
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Günther Steiner has said that Haas Formula 1 Team could not afford to have its drivers making rookie mistakes during its debut season in the sport, reasoning the decision to only sign experienced racers for 2016.

On Tuesday, Haas unveiled Lotus driver Romain Grosjean as its first signing for next season, luring the Frenchman away from Enstone after ten years of association.

The second seat is set to go to either Esteban Gutierrez or Jean-Eric Vergne, who both work as development drivers for Ferrari and both have at least two seasons of racing under their belt.

As team principal, Steiner (pictured left) will work under team owner Gene Haas, and said that both had agreed that a rookie driver for season one would be unwise.

“We looked around a lot to find the right guy because we wanted somebody with experience but still hungry to do something, to go with us this long way,” Steiner explained.

“I started talks with the management of Romain in Barcelona to see if he’s interested and, you know, we spoke to quite a few drivers, and in the end I spoke also with technical people, what they think about Romain, how he develops a car.

“We have got a steep mountain to climb here, new team, all new team members, so we needed somebody who knows what he’s doing. I think in the end we found the right guy because he has so much ‘want to drive’ now, and he’s still aggressive or still wants it.

“He’s not [so] young anymore that he’s inexperienced. We lose time by having accidents or doing rookie mistakes. I think we just picked the best one out there for what we are doing, and we focused on him and got him, and we are very happy and we are looking forward to working with him.”