IMSA: DeltaWing explains latest development updates, gearbox and differential

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In an effort to improve overall performance, the DeltaWing Racing Cars team has made numerous updates to the revolutionary DeltaWing coupe in recent weeks. As the team heads to the Mobil 1 SportsCar Grand Prix Presented by Hawk Performance at Canadian Tire Motorsports Park – a fast, flowing track that allows the innovative sports car prototype to maximize its straight line speed – team manager Tim Keene and race engineer Alan Mugglestone highlight these updates.

The main areas of development have been the gearbox and the differential. As the coupe increases in performance, the balance between the car’s light weight and the need for stronger components has been a very delicate proposition. The team incrementally added to the strength and layout of the gearbox, with wider gears, stronger bevel gears and now a stronger mounting. The team works with suppliers for these components but the bulk of the DeltaWing coupe’s parts are designed and built by the team.

The team has also successfully tested a differential, which raced for the first time at Watkins Glen. The DeltaWing was originally designed with a very complicated and experimental electronic differential that would not only help the car drive, but turn under braking. For a number of reasons, the concept was abandoned in favor of an “open” differential. The new differential performed well at tests last month and helped put the DeltaWing coupe in the top seven for much of the first two hours at The Glen, while the car’s fuel efficiency put the car in the lead during pit stops before a problem with the gearbox mounting ended the day.

Keene and Mugglestone are optimistic heading into the weekend at CTMP, where the team saw competitive times last season.

“The DeltaWing coupe is more suited to a track that allows constant momentum,” said Keene. “The Daytona Prototypes have so much more horsepower and torque off of slow corners than we do, so the more we can keep the smaller engine revved up the better it is for us – and these next two tracks lend themselves to that. Given the weight of the car, our aero is very efficient for high speed because most of our downforce comes from the bottom of the car rather than large wings or dive planes. It’s a much more efficient way to create downforce with less drag, which is the car’s basic concept.”

“The DeltaWing concept doesn’t produce a huge amount of downforce compared to a DP or a P2,” Mugglestone added. “It was designed to be a very low drag, fuel efficient car. So when you lose a small amount of downforce as we did when we went from the roadster to the coupe, it’s a much larger percentage. The switch to Continental tires – with a bit less width on the rear tire – enabled us to modify the floor and get some of that downforce back.

“With the limited slip differential we’re running now, an unloaded wheel will transfer torque to the loaded wheel. So we picked up traction in the corners, which puts the gearbox under the same stress but for longer periods of time. We’ve backed off the horsepower to the point where we know the engine is not breaking the gearbox, because we’re below the recommended torque. We’re going faster because we have more grip, both from the tires and from the fact that we now have two rear wheels driving forward. The stronger gearbox should be able to handle that.”

As IMSA finds the balance of performance between the three disparate members of the Prototype class – the Daytona Prototype, the P2 and the DeltaWing coupe – where does the DeltaWing slot in alongside its competitors?

“We’re somewhere between a DP and a P2 in speed,” said Mugglestone. “We don’t have the DP’s power, but we’re lighter weight and we have less drag, so we actually have the acceleration of a DP – but because we didn’t have a differential in the car, we haven’t been able to use it. The P2s are at the opposite end of the scale, with much better cornering ability than either the DP or us but more drag and less horsepower. If you break down the numbers, we’re actually closer to a DP. That’s why CTMP should suit the car, since we can use the straight line speed and keep momentum going.”

As the season continues, the DeltaWing team goal is simple: to maintain the delicate balance between performance, weight and reliability.

“The changes we’ve made will strengthen us for the remainder of the year,” said Keene, “and I expect to see the results of that starting this weekend. We’re looking forward to a good weekend, since fast, flowing tracks like CTMP are favorable to the DeltaWing. So getting to the finish is the priority and if we do that, I expect a good result.”

Katherine Legge joins a returning Andy Meyrick (coming off two Blancpain victories in the Bentley GT3) behind the wheel of the DeltaWing coupe at Canadian Tire Motorsports Park in Bowmanville, Ontario, Canada this weekend.

Carlos Munoz back at Andretti Autosport for 2018 Indy 500

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After posting two runner-up finishes and three top-five results in four starts with Andretti Autosport at the Indianapolis 500, Colombian Carlos Munoz will come home to the team as its sixth driver in the 2018 race. He’ll instantly vault into win contention, given his pedigree at the Speedway and joining Andretti’s team that has won three of the last four ‘500s there.

Munoz raced full-time with Andretti Autosport from 2014 through 2016. While he scored his first career win at Detroit race one in 2015, and was series rookie of the year in 2014, it’s his runner-up results as a race rookie in 2013 and again in the 2016 race to teammate Alexander Rossi that loom largest.

Now, Munoz, who spent a single season at A.J. Foyt Enterprises before both he and Conor Daly were not retained for a second year, will join Andretti’s full-season quartet of Rossi, Ryan Hunter-Reay, Marco Andretti and Zach Veach along with previously announced fifth driver Stefan Wilson.

This will add another confirmed Honda entry to next year’s race. Honda has 12 full-season entries expected among Andretti’s four cars, then two apiece from the Ganassi, Rahal Letterman Lanigan, Schmidt Peterson and Coyne teams.

That number grows with Andretti’s two extra cars, and the combination of the SPM/Michael Shank car for Jack Harvey to confirm at least 15 Hondas for the 2018 Indianapolis 500. Honda has traditionally capped its number of entries at 18 cars.

The full release is below.

A familiar face will make its way back to the Andretti Autosport stable for the 102nd Running of the Indianapolis 500-Mile Race as Carlos Muñoz returns to the team, vying for his chance to kiss the bricks.

Muñoz made his Verizon IndyCar Series debut with Andretti Autosport at the 2013 Indianapolis 500, where he finished second, earning himself Indy 500 Rookie of the Year honors. The Colombian-native went on to compete full time with the team the following year. In 2016, Muñoz once again finished runner-up when his rookie teammate, Alexander Rossi, crossed the Yard of Bricks on a fuel-saving strategy to win the 100th Indy 500.

“I am very excited to be a part of Andretti Autosport again,” said Muñoz. “The team has been like family to me since day one, when I joined them five years ago to race Indy Lights. We have been so close to winning the Indy 500 – twice with the team – so I am especially excited to be back for that race and hopefully we will have a good result this year. I need to thank Michael [Andretti] and J-F [Thormann] for believing in me and wanting me to back in their car for the Indy 500. I am also excited to be back with my teammates, and I think we will continue to work really well together. We have six cars, so hopefully we will have a strong team working with the new [aero kit]. I am really looking forward to it – hopefully we can finally get that win we’ve been so close to.”

Muñoz will look to pick up where he left off with Andretti Autosport and add to the team’s historical success at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The team mirror’s Muñoz’s enthusiasm and is excited to have secured its complete lineup before the new year.

“We’re thrilled to have Carlos back in an Andretti car for the Indy 500,” said Andretti Autosport CEO Michael Andretti. “There is no denying that Carlos has talent at [Indianapolis Motor Speedway], he’s finished runner-up twice and that has fueled his determination to get to victory lane. He has already built relationships with his teammates and many of those on our crew, so it should be a seamless process for our six cars when they head out for the first time together.”

The veteran driver has built a resume that consists of 70 Verizon IndyCar Series starts, one win (Detroit Race 1, 2015), one pole position (Texas, 2016) and seven podiums. Muñoz competed under the Andretti shield from 2013 to 2016 and finished 17th in the 2017 IndyCar season.

Andretti Autosport has collected five Indianapolis 500 victories (Wheldon/’05, Franchitti/’06, Hunter-Reay/’14, Rossi/’16, Sato/’17) and seeks to become only the second team to earn three consecutive Indy 500 wins. Muñoz will join teammates Rossi, Marco Andretti, Ryan Hunter-Reay, Zach Veach and Stefan Wilson on opening day in May for the team’s six-car effort.