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IMSA: DeltaWing explains latest development updates, gearbox and differential

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In an effort to improve overall performance, the DeltaWing Racing Cars team has made numerous updates to the revolutionary DeltaWing coupe in recent weeks. As the team heads to the Mobil 1 SportsCar Grand Prix Presented by Hawk Performance at Canadian Tire Motorsports Park – a fast, flowing track that allows the innovative sports car prototype to maximize its straight line speed – team manager Tim Keene and race engineer Alan Mugglestone highlight these updates.

The main areas of development have been the gearbox and the differential. As the coupe increases in performance, the balance between the car’s light weight and the need for stronger components has been a very delicate proposition. The team incrementally added to the strength and layout of the gearbox, with wider gears, stronger bevel gears and now a stronger mounting. The team works with suppliers for these components but the bulk of the DeltaWing coupe’s parts are designed and built by the team.

The team has also successfully tested a differential, which raced for the first time at Watkins Glen. The DeltaWing was originally designed with a very complicated and experimental electronic differential that would not only help the car drive, but turn under braking. For a number of reasons, the concept was abandoned in favor of an “open” differential. The new differential performed well at tests last month and helped put the DeltaWing coupe in the top seven for much of the first two hours at The Glen, while the car’s fuel efficiency put the car in the lead during pit stops before a problem with the gearbox mounting ended the day.

Keene and Mugglestone are optimistic heading into the weekend at CTMP, where the team saw competitive times last season.

“The DeltaWing coupe is more suited to a track that allows constant momentum,” said Keene. “The Daytona Prototypes have so much more horsepower and torque off of slow corners than we do, so the more we can keep the smaller engine revved up the better it is for us – and these next two tracks lend themselves to that. Given the weight of the car, our aero is very efficient for high speed because most of our downforce comes from the bottom of the car rather than large wings or dive planes. It’s a much more efficient way to create downforce with less drag, which is the car’s basic concept.”

“The DeltaWing concept doesn’t produce a huge amount of downforce compared to a DP or a P2,” Mugglestone added. “It was designed to be a very low drag, fuel efficient car. So when you lose a small amount of downforce as we did when we went from the roadster to the coupe, it’s a much larger percentage. The switch to Continental tires – with a bit less width on the rear tire – enabled us to modify the floor and get some of that downforce back.

“With the limited slip differential we’re running now, an unloaded wheel will transfer torque to the loaded wheel. So we picked up traction in the corners, which puts the gearbox under the same stress but for longer periods of time. We’ve backed off the horsepower to the point where we know the engine is not breaking the gearbox, because we’re below the recommended torque. We’re going faster because we have more grip, both from the tires and from the fact that we now have two rear wheels driving forward. The stronger gearbox should be able to handle that.”

As IMSA finds the balance of performance between the three disparate members of the Prototype class – the Daytona Prototype, the P2 and the DeltaWing coupe – where does the DeltaWing slot in alongside its competitors?

“We’re somewhere between a DP and a P2 in speed,” said Mugglestone. “We don’t have the DP’s power, but we’re lighter weight and we have less drag, so we actually have the acceleration of a DP – but because we didn’t have a differential in the car, we haven’t been able to use it. The P2s are at the opposite end of the scale, with much better cornering ability than either the DP or us but more drag and less horsepower. If you break down the numbers, we’re actually closer to a DP. That’s why CTMP should suit the car, since we can use the straight line speed and keep momentum going.”

As the season continues, the DeltaWing team goal is simple: to maintain the delicate balance between performance, weight and reliability.

“The changes we’ve made will strengthen us for the remainder of the year,” said Keene, “and I expect to see the results of that starting this weekend. We’re looking forward to a good weekend, since fast, flowing tracks like CTMP are favorable to the DeltaWing. So getting to the finish is the priority and if we do that, I expect a good result.”

Katherine Legge joins a returning Andy Meyrick (coming off two Blancpain victories in the Bentley GT3) behind the wheel of the DeltaWing coupe at Canadian Tire Motorsports Park in Bowmanville, Ontario, Canada this weekend.

Wolff: Wehrlein, Ocon deserve Formula 1 roles

SPIELBERG, AUSTRIA - JUNE 23:  Pascal Wehrlein of Germany and Mercedes GP drives during Formula One testing at the Red Bull Ring on June 23, 2015 in Spielberg, Austria.  (Photo by Andrew Hone/Getty Images)
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Mercedes AMG Petronas team boss Toto Wolff believes that junior talents Pascal Wehrlein and Esteban Ocon have both earned their roles in Formula 1 for the 2016 season “on merit”.

Wehrlein will make his grand prix debut in 2016 with Manor Racing after winning the DTM title for Mercedes last year, becoming the youngest champion in the history of the series.

Ocon has been loaned to Renault Sport F1 Racing for its comeback season, and will work as the team’s reserve driver following his GP3 title success last year.

Wolff feels that both drivers deserve their chance in F1 this year, and also said that Mercedes will look to expand its junior program across the course of the season.

“We’re delighted that Pascal and Esteban will tackle a fresh set of challenges in 2016,” Wolff said. “Our aim is to build their experience in the best possible environment and, following positive discussions with our counterparts at Manor and Renault, it became clear that their respective Formula 1 programmes presented ideal opportunities to achieve that.

“It is very pleasing to see young drivers earning their spot in Formula 1 on merit and to see that talent is being rewarded by the system. Pascal and Esteban have proven themselves to be amongst the top young drivers out there – and both come into 2016 as champions of their respective series.

“But they still have plenty to learn and they will be staying humble, with their feet on the ground. This is an important year for them and we will be following their progress with great interest, while also looking to expand our junior program.

“Mercedes-Benz has a strong tradition of developing young racing talent and our eyes are very much open to other promising prospects for the future.”

Social roundup: When Mika Hakkinen met CJ Wilson, and other cool shots

SHANGHAI, CHINA - APRIL 15:  Former F1 World Champion Mika Hakkinen is seen during practice for the Chinese Formula One Grand Prix at the Shanghai International Circuit on April 15, 2011 in Shanghai, China.  (Photo by Clive Mason/Getty Images)
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What happens when you put a McLaren P1 owned by baseball star and CJ Wilson Racing team principal, and occasional driver, CJ Wilson, with two-time F1 World Champion Mika Hakkinen, and you turn them loose at The Thermal Club for a track day?

Pure awesomeness.

Of course there’s other cars besides the McLaren and hockey legend, Teemu Selanne, was also on site.

This really isn’t a post so much that needs words, but one that does need proper photos and noise.

The CJWR pairing of Marc Miller and Daniel Burkett, who drive the No. 33 One Capital/Motor Oil Matters Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport dubbed “Darth Cayman” in the Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge, have been coaching and driving at an event this weekend out at The Thermal Club, a luxury race track in California.

See a mix of photos and videos below:

Ecclestone gives Monza until end of February to resolve F1 future

MONZA, ITALY - SEPTEMBER 06:  Lewis Hamilton of Great Britain and Mercedes GP celebrates on the podium next to Sebastian Vettel of Germany and Ferrari after winning the Formula One Grand Prix of Italy at Autodromo di Monza on September 6, 2015 in Monza, Italy.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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Formula 1 CEO Bernie Ecclestone has given officials at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza until the end of February to resolve the future of the Italian Grand Prix.

Monza has hosted the Italian Grand Prix for all but one year since 1950 when the F1 world championship was formed, establishing itself as one of the series’ most historic and legendary venues.

However, its future has come under increasing scrutiny in recent months following a cut in the amount of tax relief that the race receives by the Italian government.

Ecclestone said back in November that he had “no doubts” the race would remain on the calendar and extend its contract beyond the end of 2016 when it expires.

However, the 85-year-old has now cast fresh doubt on the race in an interview with Reuters, giving the circuit until the end of February to resolve its future.

“It’s Italian. A lot of conversations at the moment and not much action,” Ecclestone said.

“They said to me a few months ago: ‘Everything is sorted out, we know exactly where we are and it’s all agreed and no dramas.’

“And now I heard yesterday it’s become very political… They’ll get on with it. Or not. I don’t know what’s going to happen. Nothing we can do about it.

“The only people that can sort this out are the people that are currently involved in Italy. They can take as long as they like, provided it’s by the end of this month.”

The 2016 Italian Grand Prix is set to take place at Monza on September 4.

Here’s what a sub-4 second, 300-mph NHRA driver’s eye view looks like

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This was published earlier this week from NHRA Mello Yello Drag Racing Series testing at Wild Horse Pass Motorsports Park in Chandler, Ariz., but the timing of it being posted today is to serve as a teaser to the 2016 NHRA season at Pomona Raceway in California.

Ride on-board with Shawn Langdon of Don Schumacher Racing for a test run. This is simply nuts, as thousands of horsepower are put to the ground for a 3.77-sec, 316 mph pass in testing.