IndyCar: Hunter-Reay’s tenacity shows through yet again after Iowa win

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We’ve seen this act from Ryan Hunter-Reay and the Andretti Autosport team before in the Verizon IndyCar Series.

They were down, but not out.

Hunter-Reay and the No. 28 DHL Honda team have rebounded after a brutal stretch of races post-his Indianapolis 500 victory, when a 40-point lead leaving the first 500-miler of the year over Will Power turned into a 58-point deficit to Power and Helio Castroneves after last weekend’s Pocono INDYCAR 500 fueled by Sunoco.

On Saturday night at Iowa Speedway, at no point did RHR have the fastest car, but he did show great steely resolve. After starting 13th, Hunter-Reay raced into the top-10 early and was still in decent enough position, ninth, to where the late-race call to pit and take fresh tires was the only call.

He had the fresh shoes, but Hunter-Reay still had to go and win it from that position, and what followed in the final 10 laps was a classic never-say-die RHR performance.

“Yeah, I mean, I was really frustrated at times,” he said post-race. “I’ve learned in the years of experience that I’ve had in the Verizon IndyCar Series that you just have to keep your head in it. No matter what, you have to charge hard and be ready for it. Whether it’s a street circuit, short oval, races can turn. You have to put yourself in a position every time to take advantage of that, put yourself in a better position, get that car in front of you, whatever it is, just keep plugging away.

“We made the right call and we had the car that could take it, so it was good.”

When the chips are down, few are better in the Verizon IndyCar Series. And this already marks the second time RHR has recovered this year from a rough weekend or stretch.

After his Long Beach faux pas, Hunter-Reay reeled off two wins at Barber and the Indy 500 with a runner-up at the Grand Prix of Indianapolis in-between.

Now, after the six-race stretch where Hunter-Reay failed to record a single top-five finish between Detroit and Pocono, he’s back to within 32 points of new points leader Castroneves after Iowa with six races to play.

He’s also been the best driver, by far, on the short ovals. Hunter-Reay has now won five of the last six (Loudon 2011, Milwaukee 2012/2013, Iowa 2012/2014) in the series. His only loss was a runner-up to Andretti Autosport teammate James Hinchcliffe at Iowa last year.

Armed with the confidence of already having a championship, and the consistent bounce back he and the team led by engineer Ray Gosselin and team principal/strategist Michael Andretti have already produced, we should not be the least bit surprised that RHR found that recovery level Saturday night in Iowa.

Toyota victorious in Bahrain on Porsche’s LMP1 swansong

Toyota Motorsport GmbH
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SAKHIR, Bahrain – Toyota denied Porsche a swansong victory in its final LMP1 appearance in the FIA World Endurance Championship by taking a commanding win in the 6 Hours of Bahrain on Saturday.

Porsche started from pole in the last competitive outing for the three-time Le Mans-winning 919 Hybrid car, only to lose out to Toyota’s Sebastien Buemi within the first half an hour of the race.

Porsche lost one of its cars from contention for victory after an errant bollard got stuck underneath Timo Bernhard’s No. 2 entry, leaving Nick Tandy to lead its charge in the No. 1 car.

Tandy moved into the lead just past half distance after a bold strategy call from Porsche to triple-stint the Briton after a fuel-only stop, vaulting him ahead of Anthony Davidson in the No. 8 Toyota.

Tandy’s win hopes were soon dashed when he tangled with a GTE-Am backmarker at Turn 1, sustaining damage that forced Porsche into an unplanned pit stop that put the car a lap down.

With the No. 7 Toyota losing two laps following a clash with a GTE-Pro car earlier on, Davidson, Buemi and Kazuki Nakajima went unchallenged en route to the car’s fifth victory of the season.

Porsche rounded out the podium with its cars, with the No. 2 leading home the No. 1, leaving Toyota’s No. 7 car to settle for P4 at the checkered flag.

Vaillante Rebellion clinched the title in LMP2 after a stunning fightback led by Bruno Senna, with the Brazilian securing his maiden motorsport championship win in the process.

GTE-Pro saw AF Corse complete a hat-trick of titles in 2017, with James Calado and Alessandro Pier Guidi wining the class’ first world championship recognized by the FIA, while Paul Dalla Lana, Pedro Lamy and Mathias Lauda sewed up the GTE-Am title.