Cale Conley fastest as RCR juggernaut grabs top three spots in second NNS practice at Chicagoland

Leave a comment

JOLIET, Illinois — Picking up where they left off in the first session a few hours earlier, Richard Childress Racing dominated Friday’s second Nationwide Series practice session at Chicagoland Speedway.

RCR driver Brian Scott was the fastest in the day’s first practice, while teammate Cale Conley mastered the second session – and in commanding form.

In fact, it was a 1-2-3 RCR showing in the second practice.

While Scott ran a top speed of 172.806 mph in the first practice, Conley’s best run in the second practice was mighty stout, being the only driver to exceed 175 mph with a best lap of 175.262 mph.

RCR teammate Brendan Gaughan, who was fourth-fastest in the first practice, improved to second-fastest in the second session, just a tick short of 175 mph at 174.961 mph.

A third RCR driver, Richard Childress’ grandson Ty Dillon, was third-fastest at 174.848 mph. Scott, meanwhile, could only muster 11th-fastest in the second session (172.667 mph, just a hair shy of his first practice speed).

Roush Fenway Racing claimed the fourth- and fifth-fastest spots: Trevor Bayne (174.447 mph) and Ryan Reed (174.402).

Erik Jones, who is making his Nationwide Series debut this weekend, was sixth-fastest at 174.064 mph, followed by Chase Elliott (173.561), Ryan Sieg (173.321), James Buescher (172.999) and Ryan Blaney (172.822).

Other notables in the second session included:

* No. 12 Elliott Sadler (172.557), No. 13 Kasey Kahne (172.172), No. 14 Kyle Larson (172.057), No. 15 Sam Hornish Jr. (172.051) and No. 17 (Regan Smith (171.638).

* Dylan Kwasniewski, who has new crew chief Shannon Rursch for this race (replaced the released Pat Tryson), continued to search for speed. Kwasniewski was only 22nd fastest (169.343 mph), nearly six mph behind pace-setter Conley.

* Only 39 of the 40 drivers entered took practice laps, with Mike Harmon the slowest of the bunch at just 156.101 mph. Tanner Berryhill was scored 40th, but he did not bring his car onto the racetrack for the second session after recording the 28th-fastest speed in the first session.

Follow me @JerryBonkowski

Have a decent tax refund coming? Buy Ayrton Senna’s 1993 Monaco-winning car

Photos courtesy Bonhams
Leave a comment

Are you expecting a better than normal tax refund? Did you get a very nice bonus from your company due to the new tax cut?

Well, if you have a good chunk of change hanging around and potentially can be in Monaco on May 11, you can have a chance to bid on the 1993 McLaren-Ford MP4/8A that the late Ayrton Senna drove in — and won — that year’s Monaco Grand Prix.

We’re not just talking about any race winner. It’s also the same car Senna won his sixth Monaco Grand Prix, and the chassis bears the number six.

It’s also the same car Senna piloted to that season’s F1 championship (his third and final title before sadly being killed the next year) and is the first McLaren driven by Senna that’s ever been sold or put up for auction.

The famed Bonhams auction house is overseeing the sale of the car.

“Any Grand Prix-winning car is important, but to have the golden combination of both Senna and Monaco is a seriously rare privilege indeed,” Bonhams global head of motorsport, Mark Osborne, told The Robb Report.

“Senna and Monaco are historically intertwined, and this car represents the culmination of his achievements at the Monegasque track. This is one of the most significant Grand Prix cars ever to appear at auction, and is certainly the most significant Grand Prix car to be offered since the Fangio Mercedes-Benz W196R, which sold for a world record at auction.”

How much might you need? You might want to get a couple of friends to throw in a few bucks as well.

“We expect the car to achieve a considerable seven-figure sum,” Osborne said.

The London newspaper “The Telegraph” predicts the car will sell in the $6.1 million range.”

“This car will set the world record for a Senna car at auction,” Osborne said. “We are as certain as you can be in the auction world.”

While you won’t be able to take the car for a test drive before the auction, it’ll be ready to roar once you pay the price.

“In theory, the buyer could be racing immediately upon receipt of the cleared funds after the auction,” Osborne said. “All systems are primed and ready.”