Ford celebrates 50 years of Jack Roush-isms

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Jack Roush is known as one of the most eloquent speakers among NASCAR team owners.

He has a way to turn a phrase or drop a colorful adjective into what can be the most mundane interview.

And Roush – co-owner of Roush Fenway Racing – has been doing that for 50 years under the blue oval banner.

Thanks to the good folks at Ford Racing, here’s some of Jack’s best answers – or as Ford put it, “memorable quotes.”

So for all of you RFR fans, you asked for Jack, you’ve got Jack’s best, right here, right now:

* AFTER GREG BIFFLE WON AT MICHIGAN IN 2004, JACK WAS ASKED HOW HARD IT WAS TO GET FIVE CARS RUNNING WELL.

“I liken myself to the nursery rhyme about the old lady who lives in a shoe, she had so many children she didn’t know what to do. It’s really tough for me to bear the experience that I have, which has been considerable coming up on 40 years of being involved in professional racing. To bring that history to bear and at the same time not get in the way of the guys as they do what is current and what is timely going forward, I try to bring forward a democratic process that brings out the best that everybody has and challenges the things that are not sound that would get them in trouble.”

* THE CHASE FOR THE NASCAR SPRINT CUP DEBUTED IN 2004 WHEN NEXTEL WAS OFFICIALLY THE SERIES SPONSOR. JACK PROVIDED HIS THOUGHTS ON THE NEW FORMAT AFTER GREG BIFFLE WON AT MICHIGAN IN 2004.

“This chase for the Nextel Cup points thing for the last 10 races is breaking new ground for all of us. I’m a racing dog. If somebody wants to put together a race and I’ve got a tricycle or a bicycle or an airplane or a locomotive that fits the rules for it, I want to go race it and see how we can do. So to race for 11th, to race for first, those are all races that are worthwhile. The money that goes with that is a necessary component to what we do. It’s like air. Money goes through these things. We spend all that we can get on whatever we think is most important to us at the time.”

* ONE OF THE PERKS TO WINNING AT TEXAS MOTOR SPEEDWAY IS YOU GET A COWBOY HAT. JACK STARTED LAUGHING WHEN HE WAS ASKED ABOUT HOW HIS FIT AFTER GREG BIFFLE WON THERE IN 2005.

“My head is pretty large sometimes, but I’m gonna see if I can trade mine down a little bit. Mine was a little large for me.”

* NASCAR IMPLEMENTED A NEW IMPOUND RULE FOR 2005. JACK WAS ASKED WHY HIS TEAMS HAD BEEN ABLE TO ADAPT SO WELL TO IT AFTER GREG BIFFLE WON AT MICHIGAN IN JUNE.

“I’m surrounded by really, really smart people with one flaw – they hang around with me and I don’t know why they do that. When they opened up Texas the first time, when we went to Las Vegas the first time – I don’t remember Loudon or Fontana – but most of these new race tracks – when we have a tire change or spoiler change – the guys that I’m blessed with having in my company that I’m accompanied by, they adapt to it faster than their peers. They historically have done that.

* KURT BUSCH SIGNED TO DRIVE FOR ROGER PENSKE IN 2007 WITH A FULL SEASON STILL REMAINING ON HIS ROUSH FENWAY CONTRACT. AFTER BUSCH WON AT RICHMOND IN SEPTEMBER OF 2005, JACK WAS ASKED IF HE WAS CERTAIN THEY WOULD BE TOGETHER IN 2006.

“To answer your question, I’m as certain as I can be without being certain.”

* THE CREW CHIEF POSITION UNDERWENT A CHANGE IN THE EARLY 2000’s WITH ENGINEERS BECOMING THE POPULAR CHOICE TO SIT ON THE PIT BOX. AFTER CARL EDWARDS WON AT ATLANTA MOTOR SPEEDWAY TO SWEEP BOTH CUP EVENTS THAT YEAR, JACK WAS ASKED ABOUT BOB OSBORNE’S IMPACT ON THE TEAM.

“For a crew chief to be able to lead a team and lead a driver, you can’t get lost in mania, you can’t get lost in conjecture, you can’t get lost in rumor. You’ve got to take things apart and decide what you know to be true and what confuses you and deal with things analytically that are confusing.”

* ENGINEERING CONTINUED TO TAKE ON A MORE PROMINENT ROLE IN NASCAR THROUGH THE EARLY 2000’S AND AFTER MATT KENSETH WON AT HOMESTEAD IN 2007 HE OFFERED HIS OPINION ON HOW IT WAS CHANGING THE SPORT.

“There’s a revolution occurring. Time was when I started 20 years ago at this, engineering was something that was kept on the back burner and if you absolutely got cornered and couldn’t figure out what to do you would ask the engineer what he thought and the crew chief would make a decision to either laugh or to try it. But today this thing has gotten so complex and there are so many great engineers doing so much predicative and analysis work that you have to have that going for you.”

* THE LAST TIME ROUSH FENWAY RACING FINISHED 1-2-3 IN A NASCAR SPRINT CUP SERIES RACE WAS AT DOVER IN THE FALL OF 2008. AFTER GREG BIFFLE CAME AWAY VICTORIOUS WITH MATT KENSETH SECOND AND CARL EDWARDS THIRD, JACK WAS ASKED HOW MANY HEART-STOPPING MOMENTS HE HAD OVER THE LAST 25 LAPS.

“This is like a big Bristol. I know the first time I went to Bristol, and today, I hyperventilated. I really need to have a paper bag to put on my head so I can take in some CO2 and not take in all this oxygen that was making me crazy. It’s just hard not to lose your mind when you’ve got as many opportunities as there are with the multiple cars to be involved in something that’s just going to break your heart, just holding your breath, breathing too fast, both at the same time, as you watch it unfold.”

* JACK WON HIS FIRST DAYTONA 500 WITH MATT KENSETH IN 2009 WHEN THE RACE WAS CUT SHORT DUE TO RAIN. AFTERWARDS, JACK WAS ASKED WHAT HE WAS THINKING WHEN NASCAR MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE THE RACE OFFICIAL.

“We’ve been here for more than 20 years trying to do this thing, and I got so conditioned for being frustrated through it that I was almost not believing that it happened. I’ll be black and blue for the next few days just from pinching myself to make sure that I’m not dreaming.”

* TALLADEGA TURNED INTO A FUEL MILEAGE RACE WITH A GREEN-WHITE-CHECKER FINISH IN 2009 AND MANY CARS WERE ON THE EDGE ON WHETHER THEY COULD MAKE IT. AFTER JAMIE MCMURRAY CAME AWAY WITH THE WIN, JACK WAS ASKED WHAT IT WAS LIKE FOR HIM ON THE PIT BOX.

“I was up there to try and console Donnie (Wingo) and finally the cars started running out of gas one after another and we called off the one-to-go twice and I couldn’t stand it. I was gonna throw-up someplace, so I had to go find myself some privacy.”

* FORD CHAMPIONSHIP WEEKEND HAS HISTORICALLY CLOSED THE NASCAR SEASON SINCE THE EARLY 2000’S. WHEN CARL EDWARDS WON THE FINAL RACE IN 2010 JACK TOLD THE MEDIA HOW HE FELT.

“As far as coming to Ford Championship Weekend and not winning in a Ford with all the support that we’ve had for all the years, I would be embarrassed to go home and not have made a really good showing, so I can sleep better tonight than I did last night based on the way it worked out today.”

Source: Ford Racing.

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Hartley happy with ‘big progression’ on first day with Toro Rosso

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With 69 laps completed (28 in free practice one and 41 in free practice two) and respectable lap times in both sessions, Brendon Hartley quickly acclimated to a modern day Formula 1 chassis in his first run with Scuderia Toro Rosso in Friday practice for the United States Grand Prix.

The Porsche factory driver has been drafted into the team following a convoluted series of musical chairs that sees Daniil Kvyat back after a two-race absence, Carlos Sainz Jr. now at Renault and Pierre Gasly racing at the Super Formula season finale in Suzuka.

Over the time in the car today, Hartley experienced changeable conditions in FP1 before a more normal FP2, and discovered the new F1 cockpit after a day learning in the garage yesterday.

“A steep learning curve today! It all went pretty smoothly and I kept the car on track without making too many mistakes, so I’m quite happy,” the New Zealander reflected at day’s end.

“I didn’t really know what to expect from today because I just had so much to learn! I think I made quite a big progression throughout the day.

“The biggest difference from what I’m used to is the high-speed grip, it’s incredible here in Formula 1…it was quite an eye-opener! Another challenge are the tires, which are also quite different to what I’m used to. On the other hand, the long-run looks quite positive and I did a good job managing the tires there – the biggest thing I need to work on now is the new tire pace, and I’ll get another crack at it tomorrow morning before qualifying.

“All in all, I’d say it’s all coming together. We’ll now work hard and go through plenty of data tonight and hopefully I’ll make another step forward tomorrow.”

His best lap was 1.1 seconds up on Friday driver Sean Gelael, the Indonesian Formula 2 driver, in FP1 (1:39.267 to 1:40.406, good enough for 14th) and 1.1 seconds off the returning Kvyat in FP2 (1:37.987 to 1:36.761, good enough for 17th). Interestingly, the Gelael/Hartley combination in FP1 marked the second time in three races that Toro Rosso had a pair of drivers in its cars without a single Grand Prix start between them – Gasly’s debut at Malaysia was the other, when he and Gelael were in in FP1.

Coming into Friday’s running, Hartley said he was more ready for this opportunity now than he had been as a teenager. He admitted he’d called Red Bull’s Helmut Marko in the wake of Porsche’s LMP1 withdrawal news earlier this year to say he was game for any chance that might come.

“I’m a lot stronger than I was back then, basically. I wasn’t ready at 18 years old. I like to think I’m ready now,” he said.

“I haven’t driven a single-seater since 2012, but I like to think that Porsche LMP1 has hopefully prepared me well.”

As for the rest of his weekend, it’s been made more complicated by Hartley being assessed a 25-spot grid penalty, even though Hartley had done nothing to accrue the penalties.

The roundabout sequence of driver changes at Toro Rosso saw Gasly replace Kvyat, Kvyat replace Sainz, and now Hartley replace Gasly, as is outlined by NBCSN pit reporter Will Buxton below.