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IndyCar: Transcript of Derrick Walker’s Toronto media availability

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INDYCAR President of Competition and Operations Derrick Walker spoke to the media after the postponement of race one in Toronto on Saturday. A transcript of that interview is below:

Derrick Walker: We’re talking with promoter, TV, teams in that order. Might be somewhere around 10:30.

Q: Will it be two full races?

DW: It will be two complete races. We’re looking at the lengths now because we’ve moved the schedule around. Now we’re jamming the schedule around.

Q: There seemed to be some indecision on the part of INDYCAR to get the cars out and bring them in. What was the thinking?

DW: No indecision, surprisingly enough. We were just eyeballing the conditions. The conditions looked like almost we could get it in, we were moving back and forward based on the rain.

Q: Was there any thinking as to whether to start the race behind the pace car? Maybe let the cars blow it off?

DW: We tried that for a few laps as you saw… no we didn’t and no we couldn’t (throw the green with the yellow flag). I think it would have been crazy to start the race today. It was just … it didn’t look like a lot of water but when you get out there and look it was enough.

The other factor that happens here is you get a lot of oils coming out, when it comes out on the blacktop. It’s quite slippery and there’s a lot of water. I don’t think we did the wrong thing. We waited and waited and waited; part of the indecision, as you put it, was going as late as we possibly could to hold. We wanted to try to get the race in. Television hung in as late as possible.

We watched the weather channel, watched the rain. We thought if we could get the race started, maybe we could have kept it going. But visibility was just crazy.

Q: Can you tell us for certain, does IndyCar race in the rain?

DW: I’m here to tell you we do race in the rain. But we also do think of our drivers and our fans’ safety. Racing in the rain is great; but, you can’t throw everyone in the fence because the conditions are archaic. I think they were today.

Q: Any opposition from teams or unanimous with teams?

DW: We haven’t actually talked to the teams about what happened. We saw a lot of instant messages and one or two interviews. I think they know what it’s all about. We tried to fit it in and make it work.

The conditions were wet but not as wet as this one was. The slipperiness of that standing water, everybody looked at it and said no way, no way.

Q: Visibility was bad too, as well?

DW: Yes it was. But you have to ask yourself, what do you want? Do you want a good race? Or are we gladiators where we get a couple lions out and see who can eat people in two laps? We’re trying to put on a show here.

Q: Worst case scenario, if it’s like this tomorrow, is there a Plan B to come back?

DW: We’d stay here as long as we could to get a race in. For sure.

Q: You could race Monday, if possible?

DW: There is a slim chance, via the promoter, but I think we can get at least one race tomorrow in for sure.

Q: To clarify the three cars sent to back under red, would they regain their original starting position?

DW: Good question (laughter). To explain, there’s a lot of people getting hot about that issue, guys doing work on their cars.

Basically we looked at it – the stewards looked at it – and the race hadn’t started yet. Yeah he crashed during the pace car, parade laps, Car 12, and he was sent to the back. The race hadn’t started so it was still not a penalty as such. When the race was red flagged and everyone went to their cars, some needed more work than others. When one can work on their car, they all could.

When the 12 car disappeared and went back to the truck, we thought it was gone and never coming back. Well they put it together and brought it back. Then we positioned it at the back. Nobody requested any more time to work on the cars.

At the end of the day, the stewards are trying to get everyone back on track, wheels on and make a race out of it. Tomorrow, to answer your question, it’s not final, but would go off the qualifying positions in order. Second race, probably on points.

We need to allow a three or four hour break, three minimum, for the crews to work on their cars.

Q: What about spare cars for the race?

DW: The rules have it where you don’t have an engine in spare cars. When you take an engine off the truck, or from one car to another, they have a spare, you’d eat up all that time turning it around. I don’t think it would work.

If you have a serious accident, you’ve got three hours, four hours to get it fixed. If they don’t they could jump to a spare car. But I think with the time slot, with serious damage, it should be turned around.

Q: What time do you hope to start the first race?

DW: We’re hoping to be going somewhere around the 10:30 timeframe. Wait until you get the official time frame. Second race pretty close to schedule.

Q: How do you compare the conditions of racing in the rain on a road course like Mid-Ohio to a street course like Toronto?

DW: What you tend to find at a lot of road courses, like Mid-Ohio, is that the water comes roaring down the hill. You get about a six-foot wide river that when it’s really heavy it’s just as bad as the backstraight here. All tracks are susceptible; some don’t have the drainage to get rid of it.

On street courses, you have the walls and some drainage holes, but it doesn’t all run and disappear. A lot lies on the surface. It’s unique to street racing. We generally deal with it. We just couldn’t get it started.

Q: Derrick, to clarify, race results from the first race set the grid for race two?

DW: No. It will be, we have a set of qualifying positions to start the first race. The second race, because it’s not had any qualifying, would probably revert to what the rulebook says, which goes by points, driver points in order. That’s more likely what it will be by the rulebook.

Q: Derrick, were you planning to go green when Will Power had his accident, and if you had made it to the green is it your opinion or experience you could had continued to race?

DW: Difficult to say. Will Power, Briscoe, pace car, a few people were diving off. We became increasingly skeptical that each time we tried we saw someone slip off. In hindsight, I’m glad we didn’t.

Q: Was the intent to go green?

DW: We were always trying. You can ask your fellow journalist, Curt (Cavin) was in race control and saw the whole drama unfold.

Haas confirms driver running order for Barcelona F1 tests

MONTMELO, SPAIN - FEBRUARY 24:  Romain Grosjean of France and Haas F1 drives during day three of F1 winter testing at Circuit de Catalunya on February 24, 2016 in Montmelo, Spain.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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The Haas Formula 1 team has confirmed its driver running order for the two upcoming collective tests in Barcelona, Spain.

Haas will unveil its new car for 2017, the VF-17, on Sunday ahead of the first day of pre-season testing in Barcelona on February 27.

New signing Kevin Magnussen will get the first run in the VF-17, having joined Haas from Renault during the winter.

Magnussen will take the first two days in Barcelona before handing the reins over to Romain Grosjean, who returns to Haas after an impressive year leading its charge in 2016, for days three and four.

Magnussen will once again open proceedings for Haas at the second test, starting on March 7, and is also due to run on March 9. Grosjean takes March 8 and March 10, the latter being the final day of testing before the first race of the season in Melbourne, Australia.

“In our first test of the season, you try to make sure everything works as you designed it,” Haas team principal Guenther Steiner said.

“You just prove out whatever you did, and in the second part of the test, you try to get performance out of the car. Or, better said, you try to get performance as quickly as possible.

“First of all, make sure everything works. Everything is new on the car. The first test is quite important just from a reliability factor.

“You try to learn as much as possible about the car. You get the baseline on the car and you work off that baseline the rest of the year.”

Haas F1 Team – Barcelona Test Schedule

Test 1
February 27 – Kevin Magnussen
February 28 – Kevin Magnussen
March 1 – Romain Grosjean
March 2 – Romain Grosjean

Test 2
March 7 – Kevin Magnussen
March 8 – Romain Grosjean
March 9 – Kevin Magnussen
March 10 – Romain Grosjean

Ferrari confirms Bruni’s exit, signs Pier Guidi to AF Corse WEC team

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Ferrari has confirmed that Gianmaria Bruni will leave the company in June, making way for Alessandro Pier Guidi to join its AF Corse factory team in the FIA World Endurance Championship.

Bruni has been linked with a factory drive at Porsche for some time, with his exit from Ferrari by mutual consent being confirmed on Sunday.

“Ferrari and Gianmaria Bruni announce that, by mutual consent, they have early terminated their relationship,” a statement from Ferrari read.

“After a collaboration started in 2007, Bruni will leave Ferrari at the end of June of this year.

“Ferrari thanks Gianmaria Bruni for his professional contribution and wishes him the best of luck for his new challenges.”

Pier Guidi raced for AF Corse at Le Mans last year in the GTE Pro class, and also took part in five rounds of the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship in 2016 with Scuderia Corsa. The Italian also won the Rolex 24 at Daytona’s GTD class in 2014 driving a Ferrari 458 Italia.

Pier Guidi will race alongside James Calado in the No. 51 Ferrari 488 GTE in the WEC this season, leaving the second line-up of Sam Bird and Davide Rigon unchanged.

The new WEC season begins on April 16 at Silverstone in England.

Lewis Hamilton frustrated by sharing data with teammates in F1

SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - NOVEMBER 13:  Lewis Hamilton of Great Britain driving the (44) Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team Mercedes F1 WO7 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid turbo leads Nico Rosberg of Germany driving the (6) Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team Mercedes F1 WO7 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid turbo on track during the Formula One Grand Prix of Brazil at Autodromo Jose Carlos Pace on November 13, 2016 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.  (Photo by Clive Mason/Getty Images)
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Lewis Hamilton feels frustrated that sharing data between teammates has become commonplace in Formula 1, saying it is unfair to gain an advantage by studying someone else’s homework.

Most F1 teams operate an open garage policy that sees their drivers help each other find areas for improvement by studying data from both cars following sessions.

Hamilton revealed in a Q&A for UBS that he found this frustrating, and has asked his Mercedes team not to show him data from across the garage.

“I go out, do my laps, do all my homework – the other guy can see everything,” Hamilton said.

“I have asked my team: ‘I don’t want to see my teammate’s [data]’. I don’t feel it’s fair that he brings his A-game and I should be able to study his A-game on a computer.

“The other driver naturally may be able to do more or less than you are. But because of this data they can just copy you.

“He’s braking five metres later there, I’ll go out and I’ll try braking five metres later.”

Hamilton said that he missed the rawness of go-karting at times, with talent being the main difference between drivers instead of data analysis.

“That’s what I loved about go-karting. You weren’t able to do that and that was where just your raw talent is able to shine,” Hamilton said.

“I think it should be: ‘You hired me because I am the best, because I’ve studied, because I’ve won every class that I’ve been in, I’ve not missed one in terms of winning’.

“And you’re hiring whoever the next person is because they’ve hopefully won some things along the way as well and you’re hiring them for their ultimate skill all round.

“They should be able to go out there on their own and find it all themselves without you.

“If I can’t do it on my own then I’m not good enough and I don’t deserve to be there. And there are some drivers that don’t.”

Sebastien Buemi: Renault e.dams’ Formula E advantage is clear

2016/2017 FIA Formula E Championship.
Buenos Aires ePrix, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Saturday 18 February 2017.

Photo: Sam Bloxham/LAT/Formula E
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BUENOS AIRES, Argentina – Sebastien Buemi says that Renault e.dams’ current advantage over the Formula E field is clear for all to see after taking his third straight victory on Saturday in Buenos Aires.

Buemi followed his victories in Hong Kong and Marrakesh with a dominant display at the Puerto Madero street course in Argentina, taking the lead on lap six and never looking likely to lose the race from there.

The Swiss driver now stands 29 points clear at the top of the Formula E drivers’ championship after just three races, and is already the strong favorite to take a second crown in 2017.

“I think it’s clear that we have right now the best car, the best package. That obviously helps but it’s not everything,” Buemi said.

“You need to be doing good races, a good car and be a good team. I think as a package we’ve come out a bit better than the rest.

“We know that’s not going to last forever. If we can get as many points as possible as long as it lasts, that would be good.”

Buemi’s victory may have seemed straightforward, but the ex-Formula 1 driver revealed that the second stint of the race saw a number of problems arise that kept him on his toes.

“Today with the heat, there were many other things we had to manage, particularly the temperature of the battery,” Buemi said.

“We had some small issues on the brakes. It was quite difficult to actually drive the car.

“The car was not braking straight.”

To have finally won in Buenos Aires was also an important landmark for Buemi, having come close twice before.

“I’m quite happy because the first race here two years ago, I had pole and I did a mistake and ended up in the wall,” Buemi said.

“The second year I started last and finished second. In the end to get a win here is a great achievement. This race has never really gone our way but today it did.

“We’ll try to enjoy that a little bit and then look to Mexico.”