NASCAR: Roush camp looking for speed in Michigan test

1 Comment

Seeking to catch up with their Ford stablemates at Team Penske, Roush Fenway Racing’s trio of Carl Edwards, Greg Biffle, and Ricky Stenhouse Jr. have been searching for speed in a two-day test session at Michigan International Speedway.

Edwards is the lone Roush Fenway driver to be pretty much assured of a Chase for the Sprint Cup spot thanks to his two wins at Bristol and Sonoma. But he knows that in order to truly contend for the title, the team’s performance on intermediate and high-speed tracks needs to be stepped up.

‘My pit crew is great and my crew chief is great,” Edwards insisted. “I feel I am doing a good job driving the car. Our engines are great and the bodies seem to be very good.

“We just have to figure out what part or parts we are missing so we can perform the way that some of these other teams are performing, specifically the Penske cars.”

The Penske duo of Brad Keselowski and Joey Logano have combined for five wins so far in 2014, and Keselowski has won two of the last three Sprint Cup races (including the most recent one at New Hampshire).

But while Penske has become Ford’s biggest hope for a championship, the Roush team says that they’ve been able to pick up the pace in these tests.

“I think since we have shown up here we have found three of four-tenths of speed and I feel pretty good about that,” said Biffle, who is winless so far this year along with Stenhouse.

“I think there is still more to have. It is hard when there is just three of us here. Of course, we are comparing against each other which doesn’t do you a whole lot of good a lot of times because you don’t know what everyone else looks like on speed. [But] I think we are gaining on it and that is the most important thing.”

Biffle’s also hopeful that what they’ve learned at Michigan can help for this weekend’s Brickyard 400 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

We tested there and were about half a second off of the cars we tested around,” Biffle said. “It is the same as here. We knew we had to find that speed. So we feel like we have found some of that speed.

“I feel pretty good about going to Indy now. Certainly I was not feeling good about it until this test and we still have the rest of today to go. Hopefully we find a little more and dial it in and get ready for Indy.”

F1 2017 driver review: Lewis Hamilton

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Following on from the driver reviews from the Verizon IndyCar Series, MotorSportsTalk kicks off its Formula 1 recaps by looking back on Lewis Hamilton’s championship year.

Lewis Hamilton

Team: Mercedes AMG Petronas
Car No.: 44
Races: 20
Wins: 9
Podiums (excluding wins): 4
Pole Positions: 11
Fastest Laps: 7
Points: 363
Laps Led: 527
Championship Position: 1st

Lewis Hamilton may have wrapped up his fourth Formula 1 world title with two races to spare, but his margin of victory was far from representative of what was arguably his greatest championship victory yet.

Mercedes entered 2017 bidding to become the first team to defend its titles across a seismic regulation change, and appeared to be on the back foot early on after Ferrari impressed in pre-season testing and won the opening race through Sebastian Vettel.

Hamilton was left wrestling with a “diva” of a car, as coined by Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff, but was able to get on top of it by the second race of the year in China, taking a dominant win in wet-dry conditions.

The win was representative of Hamilton’s form through the first portion of the season. When he won, he won in style – as in Spain, Canada and on home soil in Great Britain – but the off weekends saw him struggle.

Heading into the summer break, Vettel’s championship lead stood at 14 points, with the pair’s on-track rivalry having already spilled over in Baku when they made contact behind the safety car.

But Hamilton then produced the form that propelled him to titles in 2014 and 2015, breaking the back of the season through the final flyaways. As Vettel and Ferrari capitulated over the Asian rounds, picking up just 12 points when a full score of 75 for three wins was certainly in reach, Hamilton capitalised and put himself on the brink of the title.

While Hamilton’s run to P9 in Mexico was a messy way to wrap up his hardest-fought title to date, getting across the line and the job done was a significant result.

Unlike his last two titles, Hamilton was tasked with an enemy outside of the team in this title race and a car that arguably wasn’t the fastest on the grid.

But his unquestionable talent and ability to dig deep to get himself out of tough situations – Singapore and Brazil being two key examples where the result was far from expected – proved crucial once again.

Hamilton is now in the annals of F1 history as one of its all-time greats. The pole record is his, and only two drivers can boast more world titles than him (Michael Schumacher and Juan Manuel Fangio).

Depending on how long he wants to continue racing, going down as F1’s statistical all-time great is certainly not out of the realm of possibility.

Season High: Charging from the pit lane to P4 in Brazil, a race he could have even won.

Season Low: Dropping out in Q2 in Monaco, only recovering to P7 in the race.