Bubba Wallace dominates to win MudSummer Classic at Eldora (updated)

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Darrell “Bubba” Wallace Jr. and Kyle Larson put on a spectacular battle in the final 40-lap segment of Wednesday’s second MudSummer Classic at Eldora Speedway, but it was Wallace holding on for the win.

Wallace took the checkered flag by nearly an entire straightaway after Larson hit the wall several times in the race and finally broke on Lap 147, three laps from the finish and ending any last chance of a rally.

“I didn’t think (he’d ever win a race on dirt in his career),” Wallace told Fox Sports 1 in victory lane. “God, that’s so cool, on dirt and at Eldora. … Really? Eldora? It’s awesome here. The cool thing is I came into this kind of skeptical, that we’d finish top-5, maybe top-7.

“This team, they never give up. … I said after Iowa we were going to bounce back … and this is a hell of a way to bounce back.”

Caught up in the excitement, Wallace even cracked a few jokes, including one that will likely have his mother calling him soon — if she hasn’t already.

“I wish my mom was here, but this is a good luck streak,” Wallace laughed. “She wasn’t at Martinsville (last fall, his first career win), she wasn’t at Gateway (his second win, earlier this season), she ain’t coming no more.”

Larson gave it all he could but that final contact with the wall with three laps left did both him and his final hopes of winning in.

“It sucks, but Darrell did a really good job,” Larson said of Wallace. “He was fast all day today and ran close to the wall almost the whole time and didn’t hit it. … It’s frustrating but I’m glad to be able to come here and race on dirt for probably the only time we’ve done this year.

“… I didn’t think we were really that good, so I guess I was a little surprised that we were battling for the lead there at the end.”

It was Wallace’s second victory of the season and the third of his career. He dominated the 150-lap event, leading 97 laps around the ½-mile track in western Ohio. He also led all three segments, being at the front of the field after the first 60 laps, then at the 110-lap mark and finally at the finish.

It was the eighth of 10 wins this season for Kyle Busch Motorsports (five by Kyle Busch, two by Wallace and one by Erik Jones). KBM has also now won 11 of the last 15 NCWTS events since Wallace’s first career win at Martinsville last fall.

Ron Hornaday Jr. finished second, followed by Ryan Blaney, Ken Schrader and Ty Dillon in fifth.

“I beat the heck out of my truck, I can’t believe it stayed running,” Hornaday said. “It is so fun to come out here. … Bubba definitely had his (truck) really hooked up.”

Added Schrader, “We (he and Hornaday) messed up the youth brigade, that’s for sure. As much fun as it was running, I hope everyone enjoyed watching it because we were running all over the place.”

Sixth through 10th were John Hunter Nemechek, Jeb Burton, Johnny Sauter, Matt Crafton and last year’s race winner, Austin Dillon.

Tyler Reddick was 11th, followed by German Quiroga Jr., Ben Kennedy, Joey Coulter, Tyler Young, Timothy Peters, Chase Pistone, JR Heffner, John Wes Townley and Gray Gaulding in 20th.

The rest of the field from 21st was TJ Bell, Mason Mingus, Bryan Silas, Korbin Forrister, Michael Annett, Larson, Norm Benning, Jody Knowles, Erik Jones and Michael Affarano.

There was also a shakeup in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series points standings after the event.

Series rookie Ryan Blaney, 20, took over the lead in the standings for the first time in his career. He leads former points leader Matt Crafton, who dropped to second, by four points. Johnny Sauter remains in third, 10 points back. Hornaday moved up to fourth, 19 points back, and German Quiroga fell back to fifth, 26 points back.

With the win, Wallace jumped from eighth to sixth, 28 points back, Ben Kennedy is seventh (-37), Timothy Peters is eighth (-42), Joey Coulter remains in ninth (-57) and John Wes Townley stays in 10th (-65).

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Perhaps the best part of the race came on Lap 128, when Larson and Wallace got into a classic beatin’-and-bangin’ segment battling for the lead.

Wallace was in the lead but then Larson did a slide job in front of Larson. But at the same time, Larson also kept sliding into the outside retaining wall, sustaining some damage, but he was able to continue on.

After a brief caution for a spin out of another truck, Larson led briefly on the restart but Wallace quickly regained the lead on Lap 133, 17 laps from the finish — and held on the rest of the way.

John Wes Townley, Tyler Young, Jody Knowles, fan favorite Norm Benning (62 years old, by the way) and Michael Annett made the main event in the “last chance race.”

Four drivers failed to make it into the big race: Cody Erickson, Jennifer Jo Cobb, Joe Cobb and Jared Landers.

NOTES: Wednesday’s race marked the end of one era and looking ahead to the start of a new one for broadcaster Rick Allen. He has called 278 NCWTS races over the last 12 seasons on SPEED TV and its successor Fox Sports 1, starting with the season opener at Daytona in 2003. He’s broadcast from 32 different tracks, called 61 different winners and nine different series champions. Allen has witnessed 43,048 laps run and a total of 53,143 miles of racing. He will become the lead Sprint Cup Series play-by-play announcer for NASCAR on NBC telecasts next season.

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Matty Brabham working towards IndyCar comeback

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Australian American young gun Matty Brabham is hoping to work towards a comeback in the Verizon IndyCar Series.

Brabham, 23, was along with RC Enerson the two top young guns who raced a handful of 2016 races but didn’t get a proper encore in 2017. Brabham has instead specialized in racing in Robby Gordon’s Stadium SUPER Trucks series, where he leads that championship and hopes to win it this weekend in Lake Elsinore, Calif.

While his PIRTEK Team Murray deal was announced two years ago in December in a technical partnership with KV Racing Technology for 2016, Brabham didn’t get the chance to build on that beyond the two races he did at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway road course and Indianapolis 500 itself. An impressive qualifying run at the road course saw him nearly make Q2, while he fought an ill-handling race car in the ‘500 all month to finish his debut.

Being out of the cockpit hasn’t meant a lack of work, with Brabham having kept his face present at a number of IndyCar races working to put together meetings, occasionally driving two-seaters and then staying active in the trucks.

“All the racing stuff comes naturally as I’ve grown up in it around my dad (Geoff), and from my grandfather (the late Sir Jack) as well, that’s been the easy part,” Brabham told NBC Sports. “It’s the off-track stuff, finding sponsorship and the money to continue racing, that’s been the hardest battle to get into IndyCar or any motorsport.

“It’s been challenging but I’ve learned a lot on the business end. What a lot of people forget is that I went straight from high school straight into racing, so I don’t have a ton of business experience to learn about how to find sponsorship. It’s been a lot of learning as you go.

“Obviously you have to work on business deals and try to find companies. I’m involved with a lot of traveling, and I’ve been at a lot of the shows, PRI and SEMA and the main ones. The biggest thing is networking and talking to people, and learning from them, and go about doing it.”

As the Verizon IndyCar Series is riding a tidal wave of young talent gathering either part-time or full-time rides, Brabham is one of a handful that sticks out as being absent.

The 2018 field includes recent Indy Lights graduates Kyle Kaiser, Ed Jones, Spencer Pigot and Gabby Chaves – each of the last four champions – along with other drivers Max Chilton, Zach Veach, Matheus Leist and Jack Harvey who’ve all graduated within the last three years. That number could grow if either or both of Zachary Claman DeMelo and/or Santiago Urrutia find seats.

Brabham, Enerson and Sage Karam, the 2013 Indy Lights champion, are probably the three drivers most deserving of a full-time IndyCar shot for 2018 with recent MRTI experience that hasn’t got it yet. None has driven more than 15 races in the series, Karam only having had a partial 2015 campaign with three other one-offs at the Indianapolis 500.

Seeing the success his counterparts from the Mazda Road to Indy presented by Cooper Tires have had hasn’t angered or frustrated Brabham, as it’s shown how capable the ladder is of preparing drivers for IndyCar. A switch to the new 2018 Dallara universal aero kit next year is also key to note.

“When there’s a big change, you’re seeing guys with the guys I’m racing with in MRTI,” he said. “It’s a great opportunity for them to show what they could do next year. I’d love to be a part of it. Envious of the guys testing so far. Everyone’s said it’s like a real race car that’s a bit more challenging to drive.

“But it’s really cool to have that going along, and be a part of. For the young guys, it’s quite difficult for them to jump in for one race, and compete against veterans for some time. It takes them a couple years to show results and win races. There’s plenty of young guys who could do so with the right environment, step into the series.

“It’s great seeing Jack, Spencer, and all these guys I competed with on MRTI do well – and I won championships – so it’s a little frustrating, but it’s great to see them get in and do well because I feel I could do just as well.”

Brabham was close to stepping into the No. 18 Dale Coyne Racing Honda last year when Sebastien Bourdais was injured, but didn’t quite have the funding to make it happen. Such an opportunity would have seen him filling in for his 2016 teammate, who he had nothing but high praise for.

“I think there were a couple of us in conversation – but it’s a sad thing when it happens and you never want to see it; plus, Bourdais was my first teammate,” he said. “He was great and very helpful. You hate to see it. Lots of conversations went on in the background, certain people put my name forward and my name was in the mix.”

Alas, his talent is still there, and it’s worth remembering past Team USA Scholarship recipient Brabham beat Pigot to the 2012 Cooper Tires USF2000 Championship Powered by Mazda title when the two were teammates at Cape Motorsports and then he followed up with a crushing performance en route to the 2013 Pro Mazda Championship Presented by Cooper Tires title.

It’s a common story for young drivers that talent isn’t the lone qualifier for an opportunity, but Brabham is hopeful he hasn’t faded from the radar.

“I’ve had a lot of conversations and in constant talks with the team owners and with sponsors as well. There’s nothing set in stone but I am working towards things,” he said.

“I’m kind of right on the edge of getting in there, will just take that last little bit of funding – which is the same for everyone else. I just need the lucky break to get in there for a couple races, show what I can do. I’m hungry and will work extremely hard. I know I can do it – it’s just a matter of getting that chance.”