IndyCar working to reduce hand/wrist injuries among drivers

4 Comments

INDYCAR has been busy developing several mechanisms with the goal to reduce the amount of hand and wrist injuries among its drivers.

Among the possibilities are a new steering damper, a thumb/wrist brace adapted from motocross racing, and energy-absorbing material for steering wheels.

During the recent major test session at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, James Hinchcliffe’s No. 27 Andretti Autosport Honda featured a hydraulic damper that is designed to counteract the transfer of energy to the driver’s hands in a crash.

The damper, which would work in concert with the deformation of suspension parts to disperse the energy, was first tested last month by Charlie Kimball during a Chip Ganassi Racing test session at Sebring (Fla.) International Raceway.

Keeping an eye on the development is one of Kimball’s teammates, Ryan Briscoe, who broke his wrist in a crash during last year’s Toronto doubleheader.

“…The steering damper might be the best option; you have wheel-to-wheel contact or impact [with walls on some road/street circuits or the SAFER Barrier on ovals] and nothing bends on the race car and you feel all that shock comes through the steering wheel,” Briscoe said recently.

The aforementioned brace may also help in incidents where the steering wheel hits a driver’s wrist after the car makes initial impact with the wall.

Motorsports safety expert and INDYCAR consultant Dr. Terry Trammell is working with several manufacturers to try and create a brace for drivers that is light and flexible enough to let them push the buttons on the wheel, but also strong enough to protect in a crash.

“The thumb is the most frequently injured part of the hand, and designing a brace that keeps the thumb at normal excursion but not any further has been a challenge,” said Trammell.

Meanwhile, the sanctioning body recently tested each driver’s grip strength to help push development of materials for covering the steering wheel.

“As they grip the steering wheel, they would still have that connection to the racetrack but any loading beyond that the material would provide a cushion,” said INDYCAR director of engineering/safety Jeff Horton.

“We could tune that foam to whatever grip strength wanted. It’s just another piece in the chain to mitigate the forces coming back through the steering wheel.”

F1 2017 driver review: Lance Stroll

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Team: Williams

Car No.: 18
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 1
Best Finish: P3 (Azerbaijan)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 40
Championship Position: 13th

Lance Stroll’s arrival in Formula 1 at the start of the 2017 was a far from smooth one despite a significant private testing program being undertaken in the months leading up to his grand prix debut.

Even with older hand Felipe Massa at Williams, Stroll looked uneasy behind the wheel of the FW40 car through the opening run of races as he failed to reach the checkered flag in any of his first three starts.

The Canadian was left deflated after his first decent effort in Bahrain was cut short after a clash with Carlos Sainz Jr., calling it his “rock bottom” moment – but things would turn around on home soil.

Stroll produced a stunning fight through the field to take an excellent P9 in Canada, proving his talent seen in Formula 3 the previous year and shushing many of his critics.

Better would follow two weeks later in Baku when Stroll became the youngest rookie in F1 history to score a podium, dodging a crazy race to finish third. It would have been second had he not lost a drag race against Valtteri Bottas to the line.

Stroll’s form then fluctuated greatly. He was sublime on occasion, the best examples being Monza, when he started a remarkable P2 on the grid and ended as the top midfielder in P7, or Mexico where he took a brilliant sixth.

But there were too many weekends he was a little anonymous. Sure, Williams didn’t have the best car this year, but perhaps a little better was expected from Stroll.

2018 will be an even bigger challenge as he looks to the lead the team when a new teammate arrives – and at only 19, it is a lot to handle. Nevertheless, there are positive signs to be found; you just need to look for them a little.

Season High: Taking a shock podium in Baku after dodging chaos in front.

Season Low: A poor opening two races in Australia and China.