Jeff Gordon wins 75th career Sprint Cup pole at Watkins Glen

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Jeff Gordon has won four times at Watkins Glen International in his illustrious career, but hasn’t gone to Victory Lane there since 2001.

It looks like he stands a good chance to end that drought. The current NASCAR Sprint Cup Series championship leader set a new track record with a lap of 68.126 seconds (129.466 mph) to claim the pole position for tomorrow’s Cheez-It 355.

His 75th career Sprint Cup pole also served as a nice birthday present for his son, Leo, who turns four today.

“Today is Leo’s birthday and I told him on the phone earlier that I was gonna try and get a pole for him – not realistically thinking I had a shot at it,” Gordon told ESPN. “But we were going for it and we got it done. Happy Birthday, buddy.”

With less than four minutes to go in the 10-minute final round, Gordon leaped to the top of the charts ahead of Marcos Ambrose. As the clock wound down, the Australian raced out of the pits in a bid to retake the pole with one last flyer.

But he did not make it to the start/finish line in time to begin the lap, ensuring that Gordon would claim his third career Cup pole at the New York State road course.

The pole also snaps a string of poor starts for Gordon at the Glen. He had started outside the Top-10 in the previous five races there.

“Qualifying is what’s really been hurting us here at Watkins Glen and I blame myself mainly,” said Gordon. “[But] I’m so happy today to get three shots at it – I think that made the big difference.

“The first lap, I did OK but I got held up a little bit coming back to the checkered. The second one was a really good lap that got us into the Top 12, and I just tried to do the same things on the last lap.

“[Crew chief] Alan [Gustafson] made a slight adjustment and I thought it was about the same I ran before. I didn’t think it’d be that much better, but, wow, what a lap.”

Meanwhile, Ambrose will start on the outside of the front row as he seeks to break into the Chase for the Sprint Cup with what would be his third win in the last four Cup races at the Glen.

For now, though, the Aussie will shift his attention to today’s Nationwide Series Zippo 200, where he’ll start fourth behind polesitter and fellow Sprint Cup regular Brad Keselowski.

Jimmie Johnson will try to stop his recent run of bad luck on Sunday from the inside of Row 2. Joining him there will be Kevin Harvick, who led Friday’s first practice session.

Kurt Busch and another potential darkhorse in A.J. Allmendinger start from Row 3. Pocono winner Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Matt Kenseth are in Row 4, and Row 5 consists of Keselowski and Ryan Newman.

Other notables include five-time Glen winner Tony Stewart in 13th; defending Cheez-It 355 winner Kyle Busch in 19th; solid road racers Clint Bowyer and Martin Truex Jr. in 24th and 25th respectively; Red Bull Global Rallycross points leader Nelson Piquet Jr. in 32nd; and Danica Patrick in 43rd after having to go to a backup car.

NASCAR Sprint Cup Series at Watkins Glen – Starting Lineup

F1 2017 driver review: Lewis Hamilton

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Following on from the driver reviews from the Verizon IndyCar Series, MotorSportsTalk kicks off its Formula 1 recaps by looking back on Lewis Hamilton’s championship year.

Lewis Hamilton

Team: Mercedes AMG Petronas
Car No.: 44
Races: 20
Wins: 9
Podiums (excluding wins): 4
Pole Positions: 11
Fastest Laps: 7
Points: 363
Laps Led: 527
Championship Position: 1st

Lewis Hamilton may have wrapped up his fourth Formula 1 world title with two races to spare, but his margin of victory was far from representative of what was arguably his greatest championship victory yet.

Mercedes entered 2017 bidding to become the first team to defend its titles across a seismic regulation change, and appeared to be on the back foot early on after Ferrari impressed in pre-season testing and won the opening race through Sebastian Vettel.

Hamilton was left wrestling with a “diva” of a car, as coined by Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff, but was able to get on top of it by the second race of the year in China, taking a dominant win in wet-dry conditions.

The win was representative of Hamilton’s form through the first portion of the season. When he won, he won in style – as in Spain, Canada and on home soil in Great Britain – but the off weekends saw him struggle.

Heading into the summer break, Vettel’s championship lead stood at 14 points, with the pair’s on-track rivalry having already spilled over in Baku when they made contact behind the safety car.

But Hamilton then produced the form that propelled him to titles in 2014 and 2015, breaking the back of the season through the final flyaways. As Vettel and Ferrari capitulated over the Asian rounds, picking up just 12 points when a full score of 75 for three wins was certainly in reach, Hamilton capitalised and put himself on the brink of the title.

While Hamilton’s run to P9 in Mexico was a messy way to wrap up his hardest-fought title to date, getting across the line and the job done was a significant result.

Unlike his last two titles, Hamilton was tasked with an enemy outside of the team in this title race and a car that arguably wasn’t the fastest on the grid.

But his unquestionable talent and ability to dig deep to get himself out of tough situations – Singapore and Brazil being two key examples where the result was far from expected – proved crucial once again.

Hamilton is now in the annals of F1 history as one of its all-time greats. The pole record is his, and only two drivers can boast more world titles than him (Michael Schumacher and Juan Manuel Fangio).

Depending on how long he wants to continue racing, going down as F1’s statistical all-time great is certainly not out of the realm of possibility.

Season High: Charging from the pit lane to P4 in Brazil, a race he could have even won.

Season Low: Dropping out in Q2 in Monaco, only recovering to P7 in the race.