IndyCar: Potential record-tying 11th season winner possible at Milwaukee

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The Verizon IndyCar Series has three races to tie or eclipse the overall record for most winners in a season a Sunday’s ABC Supply Co. Wisconsin 250 at Milwaukee IndyFest Presented by the Metro Milwaukee Honda Dealers.

If that sounds like deja vu from last year, it’s because it basically is.

Last season, there were 10 different winners through 15 races, and the series had four shots to tie the mark of 11, achieved in the 2000 and 2001 CART seasons. But it stayed stuck at 10 with Will Power, the 10th different winner of 2013, winning three of the last five races.

This year… we again have 10 different winners through 15 races.

So who could potentially break through as lucky number 11? We run down the candidates, in order of likelihood:

  • Tony Kanaan. “TK” is the active starts leader (14) and a two-time winner at Milwaukee (2006, 2007) and most recently finished second to Ryan Hunter-Reay in 2012. After leading 247 laps at the only other short oval this season at Iowa, Kanaan is a good bet.
  • James Hinchcliffe. The Canadian has the best average finish at Milwaukee in his three starts – 4.7 – and enters the weekend off his first podium of 2014 two weeks ago at Mid-Ohio. If the setup is right, Hinch should be a factor.
  • Marco Andretti. What’s been a recent stretch of rough races for Marco could be cleansed with a trip to one of his better tracks. His average starting position of 7.1 is third best in the field but he’s been unable to get a result to match on race day. Dominated a year ago before mechanical gremlins struck.
  • Ryan Briscoe. Briscoe and the NTT Data Chip Ganassi Racing team have run better of late, and like Kanaan, he’s a former Milwaukee winner (2008). Also was strong at Iowa. Not the first person you’d pick to win, but wouldn’t surprise either.
  • Takuma Sato. It would make sense on several levels. Sato and the A.J. Foyt Enterprises’ team’s short oval package was very strong a year ago and seventh was a result unrepresentative of how the No. 14 Honda ran. Add in this is the home-sponsored race for sponsor ABC Supply Co. and you could well have a popular winner if Sato’s trademark “No Attack, No Chance” strategy comes good.
  • Josef Newgarden. Depends largely on setup, but as I wrote after his Mid-Ohio disappointment, his near miss there reminds me a lot of Michel Jourdain Jr. in 2003 – talented, promising young driver bouncing back and securing his first career win at Milwaukee.
  • Graham Rahal. Another in the “has run better of late than his results have indicated” camp, and also has a previous Milwaukee podium finish in the bank. Struggled on setup at this race last year and the hope is Bill Pappas’ engineering will improve what was a difficult race car in 2013.
  • Justin Wilson. Wilson’s been strangely anonymous this year – not bad by any stretch, but those usual Wilson/Dale Coyne Racing giant-killing performances haven’t come with the same frequency. Like Rahal, comes to Milwaukee with a different engineer, and with Pappas now at RLL it’s the Michael Cannon-led No. 19 crew trying to turn things around for the likable and tall Englishman.
  • Charlie Kimball. Milwaukee’s been something of a bogey track for Kimball, whose average start of 20th and average finish of 16th in three prior races is among the worst in the field. Here’s hoping the Ganassi short oval setup also helps the driver of the No. 83 car.
  • Sebastian Saavedra. The Colombian posted an oval career-best qualifying of sixth this race last year but was unable to sustain it in the race.
  • Carlos Munoz, Mikhail Aleshin, Jack Hawksworth. The rookie trio is unproven at this track and a win actually would be a surprise. I’d expect more from Aleshin this weekend given his quick adaption to ovals. Munoz is a hard one to project in Milwaukee. His team, Andretti Autosport, have been excellent in oval setup and so he could well be in the top five. Or, as in Iowa, midpack and out of lead contention. Neither he nor Hawksworth did particularly well here in Indy Lights, either.

Neuville wins Rally Australia; Ogier takes FIA WRC title

Sebastien Ogier. Photo: Getty Images
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COFFS HARBOUR, Australia (AP) Belgium’s Thierry Neuville won Rally Australia by 22.5 seconds on Sunday as torrential rain added drama to the last day of the last race of the World Rally Championship season.

Neuville entered the final day with an almost 20 second advantage after inheriting the rally lead Saturday when his Hyundai teammate, defending champion Andreas Mikkelsen crashed and was forced to retire for the day.

His lead was halved by Jari-Matti Latvala early Sunday as monsoon-like rain made conditions treacherous on muddy forest stages on the New South Wales coast. The rain stopped on the short Wedding Bells stage where Neuville was almost 5 seconds quicker than his rivals, stretching his lead to 14.7 seconds entering the last stage.

COFFS HARBOUR, AUSTRALIA – NOVEMBER 17: Thierry Neuville of Belgium and Nicolas Gilsoul of Belgium compete in their Hyundai Motorsport WRT Hyundai i20 coupe WRC during Day One of the WRC Australia on November 17, 2017 in COFFS HARBOUR, Australia. (Photo by Massimo Bettiol/Getty Images)

That stage was full of incident. The driver’s door on Neuville’s Hyundai i20 coupe swung open in the middle of the stage and Neuville had to slam it closed as he approached a corner.

Latvala’s Toyota then crashed seconds from the end of the stage, allowing Estonia’s Ott Tanak, in a Ford, to take second place overall and New Zealalnd’s Haydon Paddon, in a Hyundai, to sneak into third.

Sebastian Ogier was fourth after winning the final, power stage but the Frenchman had already clinched his fifth world title before Rally Australia began. Neuville’s win was his fourth of the season, two more than Ogier, and was enough to give him second place in world drivers’ standings for the third time in five years.

Ogier owed his drivers’ title to his consistency: he retired only once and finished no worse than fifth all season.

Neuville admitted the last day was touch and go as the rain made some stages perilous, forcing the cancellation of the second to last stage.

“That was a hell of a ride,” Neuville said. “Really, really tricky conditions.

“I kept the car on the road but it was close sometimes. I knew I could make a difference but I had to be clever. You lose grip, you lose control and the car doesn’t respond to your input.”