UPDATED: Carpenter, SFHR IndyCar squads to merge, become CFH Racing

2 Comments

Ed Carpenter Racing has confirmed the report from Robin Miller earlier Saturday morning that it and the Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing team will merge starting with the 2015 Verizon IndyCar Series season.

Here’s a link to the full release.

Pieces of note from the release:

The team will be based in Fisher’s shop, at 1255 Main St. in Speedway, Ind. Details on the future of CFH Racing, including personnel, suppliers and sponsors, will be announced in the near future. The two will combine efforts during the winter months after continuing as separate operations through the final three races of 2014.

Carpenter on the merger: “I look forward to getting started with this new team and continuing to add to the success that each of our teams have had in the past. There will be a lot of work to do this offseason to bring the two teams together to form one new team, but we feel that it is a great opportunity for all of us to grow and reach new heights of success. There are a lot of details we will need to finalize after the season comes to a close, so for now we are focusing on finishing this season on a high note for Ed Carpenter Racing.”

Added Fisher: “The merger of the two teams is a big-picture plan. At the nucleus of all parties, there is a lot of synergy that has great potential for the future. Working with Ed, and capturing that first win, was a foothold in our team, and I look forward to the many more that will come as a result of bringing all the parties together.”

MILWAUKEE, Wis. – Per NBCSN IndyCar insider Robin Miller in a story posted to RACER.com, the pair of single-car Ed Carpenter Racing and Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing teams will merge for the 2015 Verizon IndyCar Series season.

Fisher confirmed the merger to Miller and her team co-owner Wink Hartman, did likewise for the Indianapolis Star’s Curt Cavin. Hartman told MotorSportsTalk shortly afterwards that, “We’re moving forward.”

Miller’s report indicated that the team is likely to operate out of Fisher’s new shop in Speedway, just outside the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. An engine decision on whether Honda or Chevrolet would be pending.

Carpenter drove for Fisher in the 2011 season, and won both his and the team’s first career race at Kentucky Speedway.

Carpenter’s single No. 20 Fuzzy’s Vodka Chevrolet currently features a ride-share between Carpenter on ovals and Mike Conway on road and street courses. Meanwhile Josef Newgarden is in the third year of his current rookie contract; Newgarden does not yet have a confirmed contract for 2015.

Both teams expanded to from their single car to add a second for the Indianapolis 500; JR Hildebrand (ECR) and Alex Tagliani (SFHR) were the additions.

The engine variable is the most intriguing part of the deal, assuming the merger is formalized.

This season, the 22 full-season entrants have been split between 12 Honda and 10 Chevrolet. Fisher’s team currently runs a Honda while Carpenter’s runs Chevrolets.

If Chevrolet is the choice, that could potentially open up another Honda lease, and that suddenly makes tomorrow’s Andretti Autosport announcement more intriguing.

While Andretti’s announcement is more likely to confirm an existing driver and sponsor already within the Andretti umbrella, this does open the potential of a fifth car under the team with a new driver and sponsor.

Fisher’s team was born as Sarah Fisher Racing in 2008, and was renamed Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing after Hartman bought in as a partner before 2012, with Newgarden coming on board to drive. Carpenter’s squad is the newest full-season team in IndyCar, having joined up in 2012.

This would reduce the number of teams in the IndyCar paddock from 11 to 10.

Either way, silly season in IndyCar just got more interesting.

F1 2017 driver review: Lance Stroll

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Team: Williams

Car No.: 18
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 1
Best Finish: P3 (Azerbaijan)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 40
Championship Position: 13th

Lance Stroll’s arrival in Formula 1 at the start of the 2017 was a far from smooth one despite a significant private testing program being undertaken in the months leading up to his grand prix debut.

Even with older hand Felipe Massa at Williams, Stroll looked uneasy behind the wheel of the FW40 car through the opening run of races as he failed to reach the checkered flag in any of his first three starts.

The Canadian was left deflated after his first decent effort in Bahrain was cut short after a clash with Carlos Sainz Jr., calling it his “rock bottom” moment – but things would turn around on home soil.

Stroll produced a stunning fight through the field to take an excellent P9 in Canada, proving his talent seen in Formula 3 the previous year and shushing many of his critics.

Better would follow two weeks later in Baku when Stroll became the youngest rookie in F1 history to score a podium, dodging a crazy race to finish third. It would have been second had he not lost a drag race against Valtteri Bottas to the line.

Stroll’s form then fluctuated greatly. He was sublime on occasion, the best examples being Monza, when he started a remarkable P2 on the grid and ended as the top midfielder in P7, or Mexico where he took a brilliant sixth.

But there were too many weekends he was a little anonymous. Sure, Williams didn’t have the best car this year, but perhaps a little better was expected from Stroll.

2018 will be an even bigger challenge as he looks to the lead the team when a new teammate arrives – and at only 19, it is a lot to handle. Nevertheless, there are positive signs to be found; you just need to look for them a little.

Season High: Taking a shock podium in Baku after dodging chaos in front.

Season Low: A poor opening two races in Australia and China.