Hamilton has the momentum, but does that make him the F1 title favorite?

Leave a comment

The battle for the 2014 F1 drivers’ championship looks to be one of the most intriguing and exciting for many a year. Gone is the dominance of Sebastian Vettel and Red Bull, making way for an intra-team scrap for the crown at Mercedes.

We know it will be one of the German marque’s drivers who is crowned champion of the world at the FIA gala in Qatar this December, but which one? Lewis Hamilton or Nico Rosberg?

With just eight races to go, it is Rosberg who currently has the advantage at the top of the standings. Having suffered just one retirement so far this season, the German has backed up his consistency with four wins and five further podium finishes. As a result, he leads Hamilton by eleven points – 202 plays 191.

Hamilton’s charge has certainly been hindered by a number of unfortunate incidents. Along with Felipe Massa, he is probably the unluckiest man in F1 at the moment. He has not started a race from inside the top five since the Canadian Grand Prix in June, and the last two races have seen him fight back from incidents in Q1.

And boy oh boy have they been remarkable fight backs.

In Germany, a brake failure saw him crash into the barrier at high speed during qualifying, but thankfully he walked away unharmed. His ego was a little bruised as he was forced to start down in 20th position, but he made up for it in the race with a masterclass in overtaking: he finished in third place.

Rosberg kept his part of the bargain at Hockenheim, taking an untroubled victory to extend his lead at the top of the standings to fourteen points. He couldn’t have done anything more to make the gap any wider; Hamilton was simply in stellar form that day.

Hungary was a slightly more difficult weekend for the German driver, though. Once again, Lewis saw his hopes of a sixth win of the season quite literally go up in flames as an engine fire in qualifying forced him to start the race from the pit lane. Rosberg duly took pole position, but was overshadowed in the race by Daniel Ricciardo. The Red Bull driver took a very popular victory at the Hungaroring, passing Hamilton and Fernando Alonso in the final few laps to take his second win. To quote the man himself: “That’s how you do it, ladies.”

As far as the championship is concerned, Hungary was important as we saw further signs of tension at Mercedes. Hamilton had used the wet conditions and the safety car period to get back in the mix at the front, but was given the call to let Rosberg past as he was on a different strategy. The Briton refused, saying that he would only if Nico got close enough. Come the checkered flag, the German fell just short of beating his teammate, and saw his lead fall by three points.

However, it was undoubtedly a missed opportunity for Rosberg. For the second weekend in a row, Hamilton had somehow fought back to minimize the damage of his loss on Saturday. It was an escape act that Houdini would have been proud of.

Heading to Spa, Rosberg will have been expecting to enjoy a lead bigger than just eleven. In all honesty, it should be triple that given his teammate’s misfortune; Hamilton’s Herculean efforts have stopped it from being so.

If this championship revolves around “momentum” (F1’s favorite buzzword at the moment), then Hamilton must be in the box seat heading into the final stretch of races. The Briton may not have a mathematical advantage, but he has rattled Rosberg. The German refused to get drawn into any debate about team orders following the race in Budapest, even if his face told us everything we needed to know.

Hamilton has won six of the remaining eight grands prix: only Russia and Brazil are still on his hit-list. He has the experience on title battles, and he knows that he has proven, even in the face of adversity, that he can keep fighting – and fighting hard.

As championship battles go, this has the makings of an all-time classic. Will it be Lewis or Nico? Under the lights in Abu Dhabi this November, we might just end up with an answer…

IMSA: Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring Update – 3 hours in

Photo courtesy of IMSA
Leave a comment

The opening hours of the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring have been action-packed, with the early hours highlighted by racing that we would not expect from an endurance race.

For example, Acura Team Penske’s No. 7 ARX-05, currently fourth with Graham Rahal at the wheel, has had a couple run-ins with traffic, both from the Prototype and GT classes, as shown below.

Reports on happenings in the first three hours from all three classes are below.


Turn 1, Lap 1 proved to be a disaster for one of the contenders in Prototype. Olivier Pla, starting on the outside of the front row in the No.2 Tequila Patron ESM Nissan DPi, tried to pass polesitter Tristan Vautier, in the No. 90 Spirit of Daytona Cadillac DPi-V.R, on the outside.

Vautier held his ground when Pla tried to pinch him against the inside wall, with the two making contact and sending Pla into a slide across the outside of the corner. Although he limped around back into the pits, the team ultimately uncovered a terminal gearbox issue, cause by the contact, and retired car, ending their race before it ever had a chance to get going.

The lone caution of the opening hours also came in the Prototype class. Sebastian Saavedra, in the No. 52 Ligier JS P217 Gibson for AFS/PR1 Mathiasen Motorsports, spun exiting Turn 17. In trying to avoid, Frank Montecalvo, in the GT Daytona class No. 64 Ferrari 488 GT3 for Scuderia Corsa, drifted out wide, but made contact with the right-front of Saavedra, which launched Montecalvo airborne and into the tire barriers exiting the corner.

Montecalvo emerged unhurt from the spectacular incident, while Saavedra returned to the pits for a new front nose on the No. 52 Ligier, and continued on.

Vautier, meanwhile, continued on unscathed and led the opening stint.

Just over three hours in, Eric Curran leads in the No. 31 Whelen Engineering Racing Cadillac for Action Express. The No. 22 ESM Nissan sits second in the hands of Nicolas Lapierre, with Jordan Taylor third in the No. 10 Wayne Taylor Racing Cadillac.

GT Le Mans (GTLM)

BMW Team RLL has dominated the opening hours of the 12 Hours of Sebring, with their No. 24 BMW M8 GTLM leading the way early on. Nicky Catsburg is currently behind the wheel.

Risi Competizion currently holds down second, with Alessandro Pier Guidi currently at the helm of their No. 62 Ferrari 488 GTE. Ford Chip Ganassi Racing holds third with Ryan Briscoe in the No. 67 Ford GT, though they had a clumsy run-in with the sister No. 66 in the pits early on, with both cars bumping each other exiting the pits.

However, no damage was done and both carried on.

GT Daytona

The polesitting No. 51 Ferrari from Spirit of Race also had a messy start to their 12 Hours of Sebring, with Daniel Serra getting together with the No. 15 3GT Racing Lexus RC F GT3, in the hands Jack Hawksworth at the time. The contact cut the right-rear tire of Serra, forcing an early pit stop. They now sit 16th in class.

Montaplast by Land Motorsport leads in the way in the No. 29 Audi R8 LMS GT3, with 17-year-old youngster Sheldon van der Linde at the helm. Running second is Corey Lewis in the Paul Miller Racing No. 48 Lamborghini Huracan GT3, with 3GT Racing sitting third with Kyle Marcelli in the No. 14 Lexus.