Transcript of Montoya, Kanaan going off on Milwaukee IndyCar traffic

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WEST ALLIS, Wis. – I’m not sure if Juan Pablo Montoya or Tony Kanaan has ever heard the term “FIBs” – something Wisconsin drivers jokingly refer to about Illinois drivers – but the two IndyCar veterans did well to hold back acronyms or expletives regarding traffic during Sunday’s ABC Supply Co. Wisconsin 250 at Milwaukee IndyFest Presented by the Metro Milwaukee Honda Dealers.

That said, neither the second nor third place finisher Sunday at the Milwaukee Mile were pleased with the way lapped cars raced them at Milwaukee.

Ordinarily, you’d look at just selected quotes, but both of these two were in rare form during the post-race press conference.

So here’s the transcript of said JPM/TK traffic talk. Unfortunately there were no microphones for most questions:

THE MODERATOR: We’re joined by Juan Pablo Montoya. Juan, tell us about your race today.

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: I don’t know. Really pissed off, disappointed. I mean, I don’t know. I felt we had such a good car yesterday, we made some changes today, it wasn’t as good as we wanted it to be.

I think everybody was with a green racetrack. I think we overadjusted at the beginning of the race to try to compensate for the setup. At the end had a little too much understeer on the car. But it’s OK.

Kind of frustrating with the traffic. Really got to come up with a formula. It’s understandable at the beginning of the race that you want to stay on the lead lap. When you have 20, 30 laps to go, you’re just in the way. You’re about to hit the wall every lap, it’s kind of embarrassing. But that’s what they did. I was pretty mad. Sorry.

Tell them how you really feel.

THE MODERATOR: Tony, we talked a little bit yesterday about how strong the team was here at the track, how strong your car was. Tell us about your race and another podium finish.

TONY KANAAN: It was OK. Like Juan said, a little frustrating. I don’t think towards the end we had the car to beat Will. I think we could have been a lot closer if we didn’t get the interference from traffic.

I think when you’re two or three laps down, there is no point of you holding people up for position. I just don’t understand that.

But it is what it is. I know who these guys were. What goes around comes around. Hopefully I won’t be in that position to hold anybody up, two laps down. But it’s really frustrating.
I understand if you’re fighting to keep yourself on the lead lap because you haven’t got a lap down. But you’re like two, three laps down, 30 laps to go, why you want to get in the middle of first, second and third place to affect the race, which nothing is going to change for you?

It was really frustrating. They’re trying to prove a point in the end, which in the end there’s no point to prove.

It is what it is. I think Will had a great car. Congratulations to him. For us, we’ll go home sad. Second loser, third loser, here we go.

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: I’m glad I’m not the only one pissed off.

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Will you confront the drivers that were holding you up in traffic?

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: People that don’t learn will never learn. If you had a bumper, move them out of the way a couple times…

Q. Yeah, you had that [in NASCAR] but you gave it up.

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: Yeah, I used it a few times. It’s just frustrating. I think that’s where the people calling the race, they should help the drivers, say, Hey, you just went a lap down, this is second place coming. You know what I mean? I don’t know.

Q. How did the race compare to the race you won here in 2000?

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: To be honest with you, I don’t remember. I’m getting old (laughter). You were here, do you remember?

TONY KANAAN: Yes. I remember you won.

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: We were really quick. I mean, it’s funny because you have to brake a little bit more back in the day so you could accelerate quicker out of the corners.

I do remember we bitched about traffic the same way. It’s just hard. With a flat racetrack, so many marbles, it’s what the track brings. I think in a place like this, the officials have to come up and do something a little more aggressive.

Once the leader gets within a second, give him five or ten seconds to stay there. It’s different than a street course. A street course is a long way around. Here, you get a caution, you’ll be behind the same guy within 15 freaking laps, Here we go again. Sorry.

Q. (No microphone.)

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: No. I had a really good car. But I really killed my tires trying to pass traffic, my front tires again. I started gaining on him. We got to Marco. Then Hinch came out of the pits right in front. I’m like, Thank you, again, another one.

You start sliding those front tires, they never recover. I don’t know. It’s kind of funny. If you asked me at the beginning of the year if I was going to be mad for a second-place finish, I would say, ‘You’re crazy.’ But here I am.

Q. (No microphone.)

TONY KANAAN: Yeah. But, you know, to be able to win, you’ve got to finish in front. That’s what we’ve been doing. I think we showed how strong we are. We’re there every weekend. Unfortunately we made our own mistakes in some of the races. In others, it was just luck. I mean, Iowa was unfortunate.

It’s hard enough to win a race in this series, it’s so competitive. We’ve been there. We’ve been on the podium the last four, like we said.

Yeah, like I said, you can hear our interview. I don’t think anybody here is happy about it. Yeah, it’s better than finishing 10th, but I’m still looking for that win. We have two more tries. I think they’re two good racetracks for us. We’ll do our best.

Q. (No microphone.)

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: It’s just the nature of the racing, you know. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with the racing. The runs that you get, ’cause the motors are restricted for the ovals, the runs you get are too short. You don’t get a big enough tow out of the corner. You can come right off of somebody’s tail, you can barely make it there. Unless they make a mistake and lose momentum, it’s pretty tough.

Q. (No microphone.)

TONY KANAAN: I don’t think it’s the package.

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: I think it’s the person behind the package.

TONY KANAAN: You have to realize you’re not having a good day. That’s pretty much it.

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: The problem is when you have street courses and road courses, it’s a lot closer, everybody seems to run a lot closer on setups. I think the ovals, the better teams understand. The drivers, you can tell the difference between a really good driver and an average driver on an oval. This is the hardest thing we do. These are the fastest corners we take. It’s one after the other after the other after the other. You can see the guys that have the talent and the guys that don’t.

TONY KANAAN: You have 22, 23 cars in one second on a mile track, it equalizes everybody like if you tried to put a fast lap together. But like as Juan says, the talent comes out when the green flag drops, how you keep the momentum up. The talent drops, too (laughter). That was his quote. I just repeated it.

So I really don’t think it’s a package problem. I don’t think it’s a track problem. It’s not a blame. I don’t think it’s a blame. It’s just frustrating because I don’t think I would do that. If I was having a bad day, I wouldn’t do that to somebody else if I’m two, three laps down.

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: The 67 had to come in for a stop. If you look at my data, (indiscernible) ran into the back of me. I got out of the gas on the straight to let him go. I did the same thing with Dixon. He got there, I just got out of the way.

People a lap down will race you all the way into the corner. It’s like I got inside the 67 once. I let him go afterwards. He drove me nearly over the curb in one and two. I was there.

What do you do next time you’re beside him? You go all the way to the marbles. You want to stay there, knock yourself out.

Q. (No microphone.)

TONY KANAAN: We had the same problem, like he said. I remember us complaining about it back then. We always had.

But the discrepancy between the equipment, it was much, much bigger. You remember, it was four, five, six engine manufacturers, two tire manufacturers, different chassis. It was a little easier to pass the back markers.

I remember, it would get really tough. You could race side-by-side at one point before the Handford device. But I think it would get really tough when you got into the top 12. It wasn’t the entire field.

I think the packages are a lot closer. The quality of the drivers nowadays, it’s actually a little higher. Before you had four, five, six guys that were really good, good teams. You also had good guys with new engine manufacturers that were not good enough for them to do anything. There was a little bit of discrepancy.

Right now there is none. It’s equalizing everybody. It’s tough. It gets to a point that we can’t do anything.

Q. (No microphone.)
JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: I agree with that.

Q. (No microphone.)

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: How many Helio had? 80, 90?

TONY KANAAN: Will knows that.

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: Helio knows that, exactly.

Personally, I’m OK with that. Honestly, I think we deserve the championship this year. It’s not like we’ve just been scoring points. We’ve been good everywhere we’ve been, ovals, street courses, road courses, we’ve always been there. We’ve always given ourselves a chance to win.

To me to be fifth the first year back, I’ll take it.

THE MODERATOR: Gentlemen, we will see you next weekend.

Gasly takes maiden Super Formula win at Twin Ring Motegi

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Red Bull junior driver Pierre Gasly strengthened his case for a Formula 1 seat in 2018 by taking his maiden victory in Japan’s Super Formula series on Sunday at Twin Ring Motegi.

Gasly, 21, was placed in Super Formula for 2017 after winning the GP2 Series title last year, and is vying for a seat with Red Bull B-team Toro Rosso in F1 next year.

The Frenchman started fourth at Twin Ring Motegi on Sunday, but was able to gain two places with a long opening stint before pitting and changing tires.

Toyota LMP1 racer Kamui Kobayashi enjoyed a comfortable buffer over the field, only for a slip up in his pit stop to cause him to drop far behind Gasly.

Gasly eased home to clinch his first victory in Super Formula for the Honda-powered Team Mugen, with Kobayashi left to settle for second place.

Formula E driver Felix Rosenqvist picked up his second podium finish of the season, taking third place ahead of Hiroaki Ishiura and Nick Cassidy.

Gasly is the leading Red Bull youngster pushing to step up to F1 in 2018, with Carlos Sainz Jr. and Daniil Kvyat currently occupying the seats at Toro Rosso.

Sainz has been linked with a move away for 2018 – relying another team will buy him out of his contract – while Kvyat’s future remains uncertain given his struggles with Toro Rosso.

Gasly could theoretically make his F1 debut this year should Kvyat pick up two more penalty points on his FIA super license between now and the United States Grand Prix in October, which would trigger a race ban.

Gasly’s next racing commitment in Super Formula comes at Autopolis on September 10.

Hunter-Reay released from hospital; not yet cleared to drive at Pocono

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Ryan Hunter-Reay has been released from a nearby hospital at Pocono Raceway after his accident in qualifying for Sunday’s ABC Supply 500 (2 p.m. ET, NBCSN) but has not yet been cleared to drive. He’ll be re-evaluated by INDYCAR Sunday morning.

The full release from INDYCAR and Andretti Autosport is below:

Verizon IndyCar Series driver Ryan Hunter-Reay was evaluated at Lehigh Valley Hospital – Cedar Crest in Allentown, Pennsylvania, on Saturday for injuries to his left hip and knee sustained in a crash in qualifying for the ABC Supply 500 at Pocono Raceway. Hunter-Reay was treated and released but has not been cleared to drive, pending a re-evaluation Sunday morning.

“During qualifying today, out of nowhere, the car stepped out on me,” Hunter-Reay said. “It was a bit of a wiggle, which I caught. The second time it happened, it came with no warning – which is a bit confusing. I hit my hip pretty bad as well as my knee, so the doctors thought it would be best to go in for further evaluation. After a CT scan and MRI, I am able to go and get a good night’s sleep. I’m sure I’ll wake up sore, but will hopefully be able to get back in the DHL machine tomorrow.

“I know the entire Andretti Autosport team worked hard to get the car put back together and with 500 miles, there is still a chance to win from the back of the field. I can’t thank the Holmatro Safety Team enough for their quick response along with the medical staff at INDYCAR, Pocono and Lehigh Valley Hospital – Cedar Crest. Also, thank you to the fans for reaching out with their support.”

IndyCar Paddock Pass: Pocono (VIDEO)

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NBCSN’s coverage of the Verizon IndyCar Series continues this weekend with the series trip to the “Tricky Triangle” for the ABC Supply 500 (Sunday, 2 p.m. ET, NBCSN).

The NBC Sports Group original digital series Paddock Pass also continues for another episode from the three-turn oval, Pocono Raceway, in Long Pond, Pa.

NBCSN IndyCar pit reporter and Indy Lights analyst Anders Krohn checks in for the latest edition of the show, which you can see above.

On tap in this week’s episode are interviews with Team Penske teammates Josef Newgarden and Will Power, and Andretti Autosport’s Ryan Hunter-Reay.

Hunter-Reay led first practice; however was involved in a heavy accident in qualifying later Saturday afternoon and transported to a nearby hospital.

His status is unclear for Sunday.

Newgarden leads the championship but had a tough qualifying run – he was only 14th Saturday afternoon – while Power was second among Chevrolets and starts fifth. He is the defending Pocono race winner.

You can see the episode above. Past IndyCar Paddock Pass episodes are below:


Chaves, Harding continue to shine at Pocono

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LONG POND, Pa. – In two previous starts in the 2017 Verizon IndyCar Series season, Gabby Chaves and Harding Racing have been shining stars, finishing ninth at the Indianapolis 500 and fifth at the Rainguard Water Sealers 600 at Texas Motor Speedway, avoiding several crashes and incidents in both races to do so, and advancing from 25th and 20th on the grid, respectively.

Returning to the series for this weekend’s ABC Supply 500 at Pocono Raceway (Sunday 2:00 p.m. ET, NBCSN), the combination continues its remarkably strong form, qualifying eighth for Sunday’s race, third fastest of the Chevrolet runners.

And with the goal of turning the team into a full-time effort next year, Chaves and the team appear to be picking up right where they left off.

“We’re just here to improve our team, get it ready for next year,” Chaves told NBC Sports. “We’d like to go home with a great result of course, that’s always the aim. But I think the work we did throughout the practice improved the car enough to wear I was pretty comfortable at the end.”

Of course, even though the team is still very new to the world of racing (their first race was this year’s Indianapolis 500), it doesn’t stop Chaves from having lofty expectations.

“You always want to shoot for the win,” he asserted when asked about expectations for this weekend’s ABC Supply 500. “Obviously it’s never easy – with the limited time we have on track, it just makes it even harder on top of it. We’re always trying to keep our expectations high and do the best job we can to accomplish them.”

Gabby Chaves and Harding Racing have been very impressive out of the box. Photo: IndyCar

And perhaps Chaves is right to have big expectations given the team’s first two races. Ninth at Indianapolis and fifth at Texas are genuinely impressive results for the brand new team. And on the surface, they are a surprise, given the organization itself hadn’t run any races at any level prior to this year. But, Chaves explained that the people involved in the team are more than familiar with the sport and know how to build a successful operation.

“It’s just a matter of having the right people involved,” Chaves said of their early success. “Our team owner, Mike Harding, is very dedicated to making sure that we have the means to go out and hire the best people we can. It’s hard to do when the full-time teams have already got most of those guys, but there’s a few guys left out there who are very quality guys. Then that comes down to our team manager, Larry Curry, who has been able to track down these guys and give them a good offer to come on board with us. We’re just going to get better from here.”

Specifically, team manager Curry has been instrumental in recruiting talent and helping the team get ahead of the game, as Chaves explained.

“When it came down to our Indy deal, we started getting our car ready, and a little bit through his connections, we were able to get our mockup engine a little sooner, our body fit sooner – enough that we had the time to go out and test and do a shakedown run at Texas before Indy. It’s that type of experience and knowledge that Larry brings to the team that helps us out.”

NBCSN’s Robin Miller reported earlier this weekend in a piece for RACER.com that the team is ready for a full season in 2018, with Harding also telling the Advance Auto Parts IndyCar Radio Network’s Jake Query that “100 percent number” Miller cited is closer to 95 percent.

Chaves stopped short of going that far, but feels confident that a full-season effort will come together.

“Obviously, our plans are still to go out and run the full season. I’d say every day we get closer and closer to that. I’d say it’s looking really good. I know (Robin Miller’s report) mentions 100% – I think we’re close to that. But, it’s not done until it’s done. So I’ll just keep focused on my job here this weekend.”

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