Edwards joins a number of NASCAR drivers in leaving “home” for fresh challenge

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Kevin Harvick at Childress. Matt Kenseth at Roush. Joey Logano at Gibbs. Dale Earnhardt Jr. at DEI. And countless others.

All were staples in their first organizations as they entered the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, as they contended for titles and grew as drivers, and as people.

But almost no good thing lasts forever, and as time passes, drivers often need to leave the team that provided them their upbringing for greener pastures and a fresh start.

The last two years, Harvick and Kenseth have capitalized on their change of scenery.

For Harvick, a 13-year stint at Richard Childress Racing brought many wins and several top-five finishes in the championship, but no titles. There were a handful of moments of dysfunction along the way, but Harvick remained committed during his final season, even knowing he was leaving for Stewart-Haas Racing this year.

Kenseth spent his upbringing and his first 13 seasons at Roush Racing, which then became Roush Fenway, with a 2003 title under his belt. But he soon saw the positives that could come with a switch – the timing was right at Gibbs when Logano, who hadn’t maximized his potential at JGR, left the team and headed to Team Penske. Kenseth nearly won the title in his first season at Gibbs, as a regular race winner, and runner-up in the 2013 championship.

Logano, who’s still only 24, has flourished at Penske the last two seasons. It’s taken a bit longer for Earnhardt Jr. to hit his stride at Hendrick, but in 2014, he’s in the midst of his best season in the last decade, and a serious title contender.

Which brings us nicely to Carl Edwards, whose long-awaited move from Roush to Gibbs – where he will reunite with former teammate Kenseth – was officially announced this morning.

Edwards raced for Roush in the Nationwide and Truck ranks before moving up midway through 2004 to the Cup level, then replacing Jeff Burton. By 2005, he was already a race winner and title contender. He’s been a consistent title contender for most of the last decade, but for various reasons, has never quite been able to seal the deal.

He’s flirted with the move away from Roush before. Edwards joked to Motorsport.com’s Lee Spencer during Tuesday’s press conference, “I’d like to thank you for breaking this story three years ago.”

But Edwards, the 2014 version, is almost at a point where he had to move.

Certain teams have a way of ebbing and flowing within the NASCAR garage, and to put it succinctly, Roush Fenway has been on a downhill trend for the last several years. We chronicled the fall-off period earlier this year.

Edwards either had the choice of staying put and continuing with RFR, or grasp a well-timed new opportunity that will allow him a new period of growth with teammates Kenseth, Denny Hamlin and Kyle Busch.

Gibbs, too, is Toyota’s leading organization – Roush had fallen behind Penske in the Ford pecking order and performance charts of late.

“I’ve spent my career as a driver there for 10 years,” Edwards said. “At this time in my life, my career, this is something that would let me reach my goal. I have had some amazing conversations. Looking across the landscape of the sport, everyone’s spoken to Joe, JD and this organization and what they can achieve. For all the good things, I’m very excited to work with them.”

Kenseth’s 2013 success after switching caught Edwards’ eye.

“To be honest, Matt’s sucesss was a big eye opener for me,” Edwards said. “Being able to be around new guys and learn from them. Like I said earlier, I just felt it was time to change. For me, this is something, I woke up this morning and I’m excited to be a part of it.”

We’ll see how revitalized Edwards will be come 2015 in his new digs.

Toyota victorious in Bahrain on Porsche’s LMP1 swansong

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SAKHIR, Bahrain – Toyota denied Porsche a swansong victory in its final LMP1 appearance in the FIA World Endurance Championship by taking a commanding win in the 6 Hours of Bahrain on Saturday.

Porsche started from pole in the last competitive outing for the three-time Le Mans-winning 919 Hybrid car, only to lose out to Toyota’s Sebastien Buemi within the first half an hour of the race.

Porsche lost one of its cars from contention for victory after an errant bollard got stuck underneath Timo Bernhard’s No. 2 entry, leaving Nick Tandy to lead its charge in the No. 1 car.

Tandy moved into the lead just past half distance after a bold strategy call from Porsche to triple-stint the Briton after a fuel-only stop, vaulting him ahead of Anthony Davidson in the No. 8 Toyota.

Tandy’s win hopes were soon dashed when he tangled with a GTE-Am backmarker at Turn 1, sustaining damage that forced Porsche into an unplanned pit stop that put the car a lap down.

With the No. 7 Toyota losing two laps following a clash with a GTE-Pro car earlier on, Davidson, Buemi and Kazuki Nakajima went unchallenged en route to the car’s fifth victory of the season.

Porsche rounded out the podium with its cars, with the No. 2 leading home the No. 1, leaving Toyota’s No. 7 car to settle for P4 at the checkered flag.

Vaillante Rebellion clinched the title in LMP2 after a stunning fightback led by Bruno Senna, with the Brazilian securing his maiden motorsport championship win in the process.

GTE-Pro saw AF Corse complete a hat-trick of titles in 2017, with James Calado and Alessandro Pier Guidi wining the class’ first world championship recognized by the FIA, while Paul Dalla Lana, Pedro Lamy and Mathias Lauda sewed up the GTE-Am title.