Belgian GP Paddock Notebook – Saturday

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After dominating practice yesterday, it will come as very little surprise to find out that Mercedes have indeed locked out the front row for tomorrow’s Belgian Grand Prix.

Nico Rosberg will start from pole position for the fourth race in a row after seeing off Lewis Hamilton in the final part of qualifying today.

The German driver had the edge on the Briton when it mattered in Q3, with his provisional pole time proving to be enough to beat Hamilton. He even went a little bit quicker at the end just for good measure.

After a rather hectic Thursday and Friday at Spa, Saturday seemed rather quiet in comparison. The weather certainly couldn’t make its mind up, going from sunshine to hail and back again in a matter of minutes ahead of qualifying.

Typical Spa, eh?

NEWS FROM THE PADDOCK

THOUGHTS FROM THE TRACK

Spa certainly knows how the throw up a surprise or two. It has been quite a comeback weekend for Formula 1 following its summer break, even if the end result in qualifying was as expected: an all-Mercedes front row.

The battle between Rosberg and Hamilton in qualifying was an entertaining one, especially at the end. Hamilton lost his first flying lap after locking up at La Source, but his second was very close to Rosberg’s time. In the end, he fell just a couple of tenths short, with Rosberg improving his own time at the end just for good measure.

Hamilton lamented a problem on his front-left brake which might have denied him his first pole position since the Spanish Grand Prix at the beginning of May, nearly four months ago. However, he was still pretty pleased with P2 given his recent run of rotten luck in qualifying. It marks his first top five start since the Canadian Grand Prix in June.

Rosberg is the winner today, though, even if Hamilton does think that he’ll be better off starting second. The swords are drawn for a thrilling intra-team battle at the front tomorrow.

The weather was very Spa-like today. One hour ahead of qualifying, an almighty downpour began that made us question whether qualifying would start on time. By the time it did, the rain had stopped and was replaced by perpetual drizzle that lasted until the beginning of Q3 when the sun made an appearance.

After qualifying, the GP2 race began with a bit of rain falling, but was soon red flagged when it became torrential. By the end of the feature race, it was sunny again!

The GP2 race was a thriller, with McLaren and Ferrari juniors Stoffel Vandoorne and Rafaelle Marciello putting on an epic duel at the front. You can watch the highlights at 7.30pm ET on NBCSN.

Doing the rounds on the rumor mill today, it has been reported by a number of sources – including veteran F1 journalist Adam Cooper – that Kamui Kobayashi’s future at Caterham is looking bleak. Red Bull junior Carlos Sainz Jr. and Formula Renault 3.5 driver Roberto Merhi look set to make their F1 debuts at his expense later this year.

Speaking of debuts, Andre Lotterer enjoyed a very successful first qualifying session with Caterham today. He outqualified full-time driver Marcus Ericsson by just under one second – not bad considering he only got in the car for the first time on Friday!

As for tomorrow? We should be in for a great race. Rosberg versus Hamilton at the front; Red Bull versus Ferrari versus Williams for the podium; McLaren and Force India in there somewhere; Bianchi starting P16 (great job!).

Spa. One little word that gives you every reason to tune in to tomorrow’s Belgian Grand Prix.

You can watch the race live on NBCSN and Live Extra from 7.30am ET tomorrow.

‘Still quite early’ for Ricciardo to think about Red Bull F1 future

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Daniel Ricciardo feels it is “still quite early” to make a decision about his Red Bull Formula 1 future despite seeing teammate Max Verstappen announce on Friday he would be staying with the team until 2020.

Verstappen, 20, put pen to paper on an enhanced F1 contract with Red Bull, with his previous deal due to expire at the end of next season in parallel to Ricciardo’s own agreement.

Ricciardo was asked following practice on Friday why he is yet to strike a new deal for himself with Red Bull, and explained he is in no rush to make a final decision when he has over a year to run on his current contract.

“It’s not that I’ve said no to anything. It’s just still quite early I think,” Ricciardo explained.

“People talked a little bit about contracts and the silly season for next year, but I thought that would still happen next year. It’s still quite early.

“If I’m to try and extract some positives out of his news it’s that it gives us good confidence for next year. He and his management see a lot of positives in the team to continue like that.

“I’m 100 per cent here next year, I can at least say that, and I think it gives both of us confidence that we’ll keep progressing the way we are.”

Red Bull said upon announcing Verstappen’s new deal that it wants to “build a team around him”, with the 20-year-old standing out as a once-in-a-generation talent.

The focus surrounding Verstappen has not left Ricciardo feeling as though he is in the shade or in any way playing second-fiddle to the Dutchman, stressing he has no internal concerns at Red Bull.

“For sure, as far as media goes, he certainly gets a lot of attention. He’s broken records for his age and things like that, so rightly so,” Ricciardo said.

“Take the media out of it, as far as inside the team, new parts on the car, things like this, there’s always been parity and equality.”

Verstappen is only the third driver to commit to a deal beyond the end of next season, following Sebastian Vettel at Ferrari and Fernando Alonso at McLaren on multi-year contracts.

All 10 F1 teams have at least one free seat for 2019, making Ricciardo a possible candidate for seats with either Mercedes or Ferrari were he to consider a move away from Red Bull.

Speaking to British broadcaster Sky Sports, Red Bull F1 advisor Helmut Marko said he felt Ricciardo was “putting himself on the market” by waiting to make a decision on his future, but that talks would take place when possible.