Future for veteran Sprint Cup crew chief Jimmy Fennig after this season is uncertain

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With Carl Edwards heading to Joe Gibbs Racing next season, what will happen to veteran NASCAR crew chief Jimmy Fennig?

According to FoxSports.com, Fennig is waiting to discuss his future with team co-owner Jack Roush.

That future could potentially include a new role with the Roush Fenway Racing organization, perhaps becoming a crew chief for another driver (Trevor Bayne would be the most likely candidate) or possibly retirement.

It’s unlikely Fennig would follow Edwards to JGR, having spent most of his Cup career at RFR.

Fennig said he’d welcome a new role with the research and development arm of RFR, adding he doesn’t expect to remain as a crew chief after this season.

Roush appears to be as up in the air about Fennig’s future as Fennig himself is.

“We don’t have a plan yet,” Roush told FoxSports.com about Fennig’s plans for the future. “We haven’t heard definitively from Jimmy what his plans are, but he may be thinking about retirement. We’re just not sure.”

If Fennig remains as a crew chief in the RFR organization, it would mark his 30th year atop a Sprint Cup pit box. He was Kurt Busch’s crew chief when the elder Busch brother won the inaugural Chase for the Sprint Cup (known back then as the Chase for the Nextel Cup) in 2004.

He also directed Martin to his most successful season – although he fell short of the championship that year – in 1998. Martin earned seven wins, 22 top-5 and 26 top-10 finishes, and finished second in the Cup standings (one of five seasons that Martin finished runner-up).

In addition to Busch and Edwards, Fennig has also worked with Mark Martin, Jamie McMurray, David Ragan, Matt Kenseth, Dick Trickle, NASCAR Hall of Famer Bobby Allison, Hut Stricklin, Jimmy Spencer and Kenny Wallace.

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Audi bids farewell to Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich upon retirement

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Audi bid farewell to its iconic head of motorsport, Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich, at its end-of-season ‘Race Night’ event in Germany on Friday upon his retirement.

Ullrich took over the reins as Audi’s head of motorsport in 1993 and stayed in the role for 23 years, overseeing its arrival in the prototype class of sports car racing and domination of the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Ullrich stepped down from the position at the end of 2016, handing the reins over to ex-Audi DTM chief Dieter Gass, and attended his final racing event with the German marque at its first works Formula E outing in Hong Kong earlier this month.

Ullrich was honored at the Race Night event on Friday and thanked for his efforts in developing Audi into a force within global motorsport.

“In 566 factory-backed commitments during this period he celebrated 209 victories, 13 of them in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, eleven in the 12-hour race at Sebring and nine in the ‘Petit Le Mans’ at Road Atlanta,” a piece on Ullrich’s tenure for Audi’s website reads.

“31 driver titles in super touring car racing, in the DTM and in the sports prototype category are credited to him. 57 campaigners were Audi factory drivers during Wolfgang Ullrich’s era and he was responsible for 18 new developments of racing cars – an impressive tally.”