Newey: Belgium about damage limitation for Red Bull

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Red Bull chief technical officer Adrian Newey has said that this weekend’s Belgian Grand Prix is about damage limitation for the defending world champions, given that the Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps will exploit many of the weaknesses on the RB10 car.

The biggest issue for Red Bull at Spa are the long straights and high-speed corners, which require a good top speed. All of the teams that use Renault engines have been suffering from a lack of power in 2014, and this was particularly clear during practice yesterday.

The Mercedes power unit is by far the best on the grid, with seven cars powered by the German marque finishing in the top ten in each session. Predictably, Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg locked out the top two positions in both sessions for the works team.

For Newey, this race is about Red Bull doing as well as it can in light of the problems with the engine, and he believes that the team’s next opportunity to win a race will come at Singapore in one month’s time.

“Certainly unless weather plays a part in the race and we manage to get that right or unless we are plain lucky, then given a sort of normal dry race, it seems very unlikely that we will be battling for the win,” Newey said.

“At that point, it becomes damage limitation.

“Possibly Singapore we have a chance. I think it goes without saying that the circuits that have the shorter straights are the ones that suit us best.”

Red Bull has not carried over its championship-winning form from 2013 into this year, with Daniel Ricciardo’s two victories coming in races where Mercedes was not at the peak of its powers. Nevertheless, the team looks set to finish second in the constructors’, relying that it can fend off Williams and Ferrari behind.

Newey also spoke about his job change at Red Bull, with the aerodynamicist set to take up more of a mentor-style role at the team for 2015 so he can focus on other projects outside of F1.

“At the moment I’m still full-time at Red Bull Racing and will be certainly over the coming months as we finalize the general layout of the car,” he said. “It won’t be until Christmas that I start to really get into new roles.”

IndyCar 2017 driver review: Sebastien Bourdais

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MotorSportsTalk continues its annual review of the Verizon IndyCar Series drivers that raced in 2017. A dream start occurred for Sebastien Bourdais and the Dale Coyne Racing team upon their reunion, followed by a nightmare in Indianapolis with a huge crash in qualifying, and ended with a rapid recovery to build confidence for 2018.

Sebastien Bourdais, No. 18 Dale Coyne Racing Honda

  • 2016: 14th Place, 1 Win, Best Start 3rd, 1 Podium, 3 Top-5, 11 Top-10, 24 Laps Led, 11.9 Avg. Start, 11.2 Avg. Finish
  • 2017: 21st Place (8 Starts), 1 Win, Best Start 6th, 2 Podiums, 2 Top-5, 5 Top-10, 74 Laps Led, 12.4 Avg. Start, 11.0 Avg. Finish

The 2017 campaign for Sebastien Bourdais upon his return to Dale Coyne Racing will forever be known as both a year of “what could have been” and a year of “what a comeback it was.”

The abnormal season for Bourdais stretched eight races with a three-month break in the middle owing to his own mistake qualifying for the Indianapolis 500, which left him with multiple pelvic fractures and a fracture to his right hip. His car was a rocket ship; but after two laps at 231 mph, Bourdais appeared to over-correct and destroyed the wall at Turn 2 in Indy in a massive 127G impact. It was a horrific looking accident, but one that also saw Bourdais rather lucky to have not been injured worse.

It set forth in motion an incredible recovery that saw Bourdais back testing the Monday after Mid-Ohio, just over two months since the accident, then in race action just over three months later at the 1.25-mile Gateway Motorsports Park oval, and because Bourdais is a regulation badass, he finished in the top-10 straight out of the box. He worked as hard as he did to return earlier than anticipated to avoid an offseason of questions asking if he’d come back and if he’d be strong enough to do so.

The recovery was a welcome story to end the year after the agony at Indy that stopped a potential title run or certainly top-five in points finish in its tracks. A classic Coyne strategy special vaulted Bourdais from last to first and a popular win in his U.S. hometown of St. Petersburg to kick off the year. A second place at Long Beach backed it up and eighth at Barber kept him atop the standings.

But Indy was shaping up to be an important bounce back weekend after Bourdais got taken out in Phoenix, then incurred an engine failure in the IMS road course race. And then, of course, his loud and violent accident qualifying for the ‘500 changed the course of the season.

After three “almost there” but largely unfulfilling years at KV Racing Technology, Bourdais embraced the family atmosphere back at Coyne along with longtime engineers Craig Hampson and Olivier Boisson, determined to continue punching above the team’s weight. He crafted a remarkable story all season and will be keen to fulfill it over the course of a proper full campaign in 2018.