Sports car racing may be confusing, but that’s no excuse for this graphic (PHOTOS)

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Yes, between the FIA World Endurance Championship (LMP1-H, LMP1-L, LMP2, GTE-Pro, GTE-Am), TUDOR United SportsCar Championship (P, PC, GTLM, GTD), Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge (GS, ST) and Pirelli World Challenge (GT, GT-A, GTS, TC, TCA, TCB) you have 15 different classes and two in-category subclasses (LMP1-L and PWC GT-A, respectively), so sports car racing is confusing.

Still, if you’re promoting an event, that’s still no excuse to not do some basic research as to which cars fit into which class when you’re creating a promotional poster for said event.

Hat tip to Rebellion Racing for finding this gem off the cotaexperiences.com website, in advance of the FIA WEC/IMSA combined weekend Sept. 19-20 at Austin’s Circuit of the Americas.

This GTE-Am group shot is littered with errors.

For 8Star Motorsports, the car pictured is a pre-bodywork update Corvette Daytona Prototype, that 8Star ran in the 2013 GRAND-AM Rolex Series DP class. 8Star this year runs a year-old Ferrari F458 Italia in the FIA WEC GTE-Am category; it also runs a PC class Oreca FLM09 in the TUDOR Championship, but its PC car would be just as irrelevant to GTE-Am as is this older DP.

AF Corse is misspelled as “AF Course.” And the chassis is the older model Ferrari F430 GT, which has been out of commission since 2010, before the introduction of the F458 in 2011. What’s particularly egregious here is that AF Corse ran no less than seven combined GTE-Pro and GTE-Am F458s in this year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans… yet this creator decided to grab a four-year old car because, hey, it’s a red Ferrari, who’s going to know the difference?

The errors roll on in GTE-Am with the next car, which is a whopper. A customer Lola-Aston Martin LMP1 car from maybe 2007 or 2008 is utilized in the place of where the factory Aston Martin Racing Aston Martin Vantage should be placed. And again, come on guys, basic research here… AMR ran four Vantages at this year’s Le Mans, and actually won the GTE-Am class with the “Dane Train” No. 95 car. Instead, they’ve gone for this car. I’ll let Twitter user Fred Smith point out how much skill it takes to get a car this wrong.

Lastly, ProSpeed Competition rounds out this page with something that’s actually in range. The team had an older Porsche 911 GT3 RSR in its arsenal, and I believe the No. 75 car pictured here is the one drafted into last-minute action at this year’s Le Mans, and then shifted from the GTE-Am to GTE-Pro class where Jeroen Bleekemolen and Cooper MacNeil drove the race on their own. But this ProSpeed photo wouldn’t fit the comedy of errors without being wrong itself, too. The team runs a 991-spec Porsche 911 RSR in the FIA WEC this year, so the photo’s still wrong.

Like Rebellion Racing, which competes in the LMP1-L category with its Rebellion R-One Toyota, Aston Martin poked a bit of fun at this perplexing quartet when discussing the loved/hated acronym we all know from sports car racing: BoP (Balance of Performance).

The actual cars these teams – and the rest of the FIA WEC field – will be at Austin Sept. 19-20.

‘No desire’ for Lewis Hamilton to race in Indianapolis 500

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Lewis Hamilton has ruled out a future appearance in the Indianapolis 500, saying he has “no real plans” to do any serious racing once his time in Formula 1 is over.

Former teammate and current McLaren driver Fernando Alonso took part in the 101st running of the Indy 500 in May, qualifying fifth and running high up the order before retiring late on with an engine issue.

The F1-to-IndyCar crossover proved to be one of the biggest motorsport stories of the year, and has stirred the imagination of other drivers to make a similar step into other events in the future, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans which is known to be on Alonso’s radar as well as that of Haas racer Romain Grosjean.

Three-time F1 world champion Hamilton admired 2017 Indy 500 winner Takuma Sato’s victory ring when on the podium at the Japanese Grand Prix earlier this month, trying it on and joking it may spur him to enter the race to try and win the jewelry.

Speaking ahead of this weekend’s United States Grand Prix in Austin, Texas, Hamilton stressed he made the comment in jest, saying he holds not interest in entering the ‘500.

“Honestly it hasn’t inspired me to do the Indy 500,” Hamilton said.

“I’ve always respected it and appreciated it. I got to watch part of it when Fernando did it which I thought was super exciting. I love the idea of drivers being able to do more than one series.

“Just the other day I got to drive an F1 car on an oval circuit which was interesting. I have a huge amount of respect for those drivers as it is quite scary approaching those banks at the speeds that they do.

“I personally don’t have a desire to drive it. Maybe one day I will go out and have some fun.

“I have a lot of opportunities to do those kinds of things, but no real plans to do anything serious.”

Hamilton has previously said he would like to try a NASCAR race for fun one day, but has made clear his plan after his F1 career is over is to distance himself from racing in order to pursue other interests.