James Hinchcliffe

The most memorable moments of IndyCar 2014 (so far)

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Every race has that one moment that people remember. Sometimes, it’s good. Sometimes, it isn’t. But it sticks with you.

This year’s Verizon IndyCar Series season is coming to a close on Saturday night at Auto Club Speedway (9 p.m. ET on NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra), and while there’s still 500 miles to go, now’s an opportune time to revisit 2014’s most memorable moments – so far.

You’ll notice in the collection of videos below that for the doubleheader weekends at Detroit, Houston, and Toronto, we’ve opted to go with the best moment from the entire weekend itself. Rest assured that this is only meant for the sake of brevity.

And now, away we go…

FIRESTONE GRAND PRIX OF ST. PETERSBURG

Will Power’s season-opening victory at St. Petersburg wasn’t altogether smooth. Coming to a restart with 28 laps to go as the leader, Power appeared to slow down instead of accelerate (skip to 1:55 in the video above).

That caused the field to stack up, and in the process, Jack Hawksworth hit another car from behind before collecting Marco Andretti.

Power held the lead on the subsequent restart with 23 laps left and went on to win. But the earlier incident led to divided opinions among drivers and team owners on whether Power deserved blame for it.

TOYOTA GRAND PRIX OF LONG BEACH

Ryan Hunter-Reay was contending for victory in the streets of Long Beach, but with 25 laps to go, he pretty much threw the afternoon away for himself and several others.

A quick pit stop for Josef Newgarden enabled him to come out with the race lead ahead of Hunter-Reay. But instead of biding his time, Hunter-Reay made a risky passing attempt on Newgarden at Turn 4 – and mayhem ensued.

Not one of the 2012 IndyCar champion’s finer moments.

BARBER MOTORSPORTS PARK

Hunter-Reay was able to bounce back from that lowlight with a victory in the next race at Barber Motorsports Park. But the Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama may have gone Power’s way, if not for an early error at the track’s “Charlotte’s Web” hairpin at Turn 5.

Power was holding a comfortable lead at Lap 15, when he locked up going into T5 and went into the gravel trap (skip to :18 in the video above). He swiped a tire barrier on his way out, but while he was able to get back on course, he’d lost the lead to Hunter-Reay in the meantime. RHR scored the win, while Power finished fifth.

GRAND PRIX OF INDIANAPOLIS

A solid crowd and beautiful weather greeted the drivers as they made their way to the grid for the standing start. But pole sitter Sebastian Saavedra stalled (skip to :25 of the video above), causing a mad scramble behind him to get away from his No. 17 KV/AFS Racing Chevrolet.

Unfortunately, both Carlos Munoz and Mikhail Aleshin got into Saavedra, spraying debris everywhere along the front-stretch. It wasn’t the only wild crash of the afternoon, which eventually ended with Simon Pagenaud atop the podium.

INDIANAPOLIS 500

Ryan Hunter-Reay vs. Helio Castroneves for racing’s biggest prize. Nothing more needs to be said. Skip to 7:20 for the good stuff.

Honorable mention to Kurt Busch.

CHEVROLET INDY DUAL IN DETROIT

Power won Race 1 of the Detroit doubleheader at Belle Isle Park, but it was his drive in Race 2 that may be equally memorable. On the first lap of that race, Power attempted to get past Newgarden on the inside but instead made contact that led Newgarden into collecting two other drivers.

Race Control tagged Power for avoidable contact. The Twittersphere cheered. And the Aussie was chastened. Actually, no, the last part didn’t occur. If anything, it just seemed to fire him up as Power roared all the way from the back of the field after the penalty to finish second behind Penske teammate Helio Castroneves.

Oh, what the reaction would have been if Power ended up one spot higher…

FIRESTONE 600 AT TEXAS

Ed Carpenter and Power appeared set to have an old-fashioned Texas duel for the win when the two made their final pit stops together with 36 laps left. But Power was hit with a drive-through penalty for speeding (penalties were a recurring theme for him until just recently).

Smooth sailing then for Carpenter, right? Wrong. A caution with less than 10 laps left gave Power the chance to go in for new tires before a restart with two laps to go.

But while Power rocketed to second with the fresh rubber, he ran out of time to catch Carpenter. With that, the IndyCars’ sole owner/driver joined his road and street course racer, Mike Conway, as a 2014 race winner.

SHELL/PENNZOIL GRAND PRIX OF HOUSTON

Who had Carlos Huertas as the first of this year’s crop of IndyCar rookies to win a race? Be honest, we don’t like liars here.

The result that no one saw coming went down in the first race of the Houston weekend. Huertas stayed out during a caution with less than half an hour to go in the race, and he eventually took control of the lead. The Colombian was able to hold off Juan Pablo Montoya until another caution came out with four minutes left.

Everything was set for a restart with one lap to go, but Graham Rahal got into the back of Tony Kanaan as the field headed for what would have been the green flag. Race Control waved off the restart, giving the upset win to the previously unheralded Huertas.

POCONO INDYCAR 500

The first 158 laps at Pocono went by under green – and with minimal drama. But that changed following the race’s lone restart.

Under attack from teammate (and eventual race winner) Montoya, Power went to defend his lead and knocked Montoya’s front wing end plate off. Montoya was still able to take the lead shortly afterwards, leaving Power to deal with Castroneves.

But when Castroneves went for an inside pass on Power with 28 laps left, Power tacked to the inside twice and forced Castroneves to back off. Race Control told Power to serve a drive-through penalty for blocking, which helped send him to a 10th-place finish.

IOWA CORN INDY 300

You saw it. Yet you couldn’t quite believe it.

During the final caution of the Iowa Corn Indy 300, both Ryan Hunter-Reay and Josef Newgarden rolled the dice, went to the pits, and got new tires ahead of a restart with nine laps to go.

The decision paid off handsomely as the two Americans went through the field like a hungry kid going through an Iowa corn on the cob. And with three laps left, Hunter-Reay caught Tony Kanaan before making the race-winning pass in Turn 1. Newgarden also got past Kanaan in the waning moments for a runner-up.

HONDA INDY TORONTO

Sebastien Bourdais, the four-time king of Champ Car, had not won an American open-wheel race since 2007.

But in the first race of a same-day doubleheader in Toronto, the Frenchman led most of the proceedings from pole before claiming a long-awaited victory for himself and for KV Racing Technology (which had not won themselves since the 2013 Indy 500 with Tony Kanaan).

HONDA INDY 200 AT MID-OHIO

Scott Dixon winning at Mid-Ohio after qualifying 22nd? That couldn’t possibly happen, we thought.

But a brilliant all-around performance that featured stellar driving from the New Zealand native and impeccable strategy from his Chip Ganassi Racing team enabled Dixon to earn one of the greatest victories of his career.

Meanwhile, Newgarden had to see a potential first IndyCar win go by the boards thanks to numerous errors on a Lap 65 pit stop. Those problems led to a devastating drive-through penalty that ruined his race.

But instead of frustration, Newgarden showed remarkable poise. There’s a reason why this guy is a fan favorite.

ABC SUPPLY WISCONSIN 250

Nobody had really taken control of the IndyCar championship when the series visited the Milwaukee Mile with three races left in the season.

But Power finally stepped up, and he made his biggest statement of the year. Despite having to save fuel late, Power was still able to leave second-place Montoya stuck in lapped traffic before taking the checkered flag.

And as a driver that was once pegged as a non-factor on ovals, Power relished the moment: “Yes! Man, I love winning on ovals,” he yelled with delight.

GoPro GRAND PRIX OF SONOMA

Last weekend’s race at Sonoma had been owned lock, stock, and barrel by Power until he lost the race off pit road to Dixon under a caution. Then, after restarting seventh on Lap 40 behind Dixon and a group of drivers that had stayed on track, Power spun in Turn 7.

The incident forced Power to rally for a 10th-place finish after falling back as far as 20th. It was a great recovery for sure, and instead of his points lead over Castroneves shrinking, it increased to the current 51-point margin.

But on the other hand, had Power not spun and went on to win instead of Dixon, would we even have a championship battle to talk about right now?

Sage Karam reflects on road ahead with Indy 500 only on the horizon

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At 20 years old, Sage Karam is the latest – but not the first – American to stand at the crossroads of an open-wheel career without knowing what’s coming next.

A cursory glance of the Verizon IndyCar Series field reveals several of his countrymen – Ryan Hunter-Reay, Graham Rahal, Conor Daly, even Spencer Pigot – as those in the “we didn’t have a full-time ride opportunity at some point in our careers but we’re going to keep fighting for it as hard as we can” club.

And that’s before you get into the international drivers in the same boat – the Simon Pagenauds, Will Powers, and Sebastien Bourdais’s of the world – who came back to IndyCar only on part-time programs before reaffirming their full-time status in better opportunities.

Point being, while it’s unfortunate that Karam’s IndyCar opportunity for 2016 is, at the moment, limited to the Indianapolis 500 with Dreyer & Reinbold Racing with Kingdom Racing, the Nazareth, Pa. native is at a more mature mindset than you might expect for someone his age, or someone stuck in his situation.

You see, Karam has been here before – in fact, his situation for February 2016 is no different than where it’s been each of the last three years, more or less.

Before he set out to win the 2013 Indy Lights title, Karam didn’t even have a confirmed ride less than a month out. He’d been with Andretti Autosport for the bulk of his rise through the Mazda Road to Indy but it was only thanks to an eleventh hour deal with longtime supporter Comfort Revolution he garnered a place with Schmidt Peterson Motorsports. He then beat future IndyCar rookies Gabby Chaves, Carlos Munoz and Jack Hawksworth to the championship.

His reward for that title? Not knowing what his status would be for 2014.

It was only thanks to a “Christmas gift” that he entered the Chip Ganassi Racing fold as a development driver. He proceeded to drive the wheels off of everything he could that year, notably at Sebring in sports cars and then with DRR in his Indianapolis 500 debut.

His reward for that “making the best of all opportunities” run? Still uncertainty for 2015, and as it turned out, a race-to-race deal with Ganassi in a fourth IndyCar.

So suddenly the fact it’s early February 2016 and Karam has not just one, but two confirmed programs for this season – the Indianapolis 500 drive plus a full-season in the new F Performance Racing Lexus RC F GT3, whenever it debuts – actually puts him ahead of several others who you’d hope would have something, but don’t.

“To be back with Dreyer & Reinbold is a great thing. It’s the team I started with. It’s like a homecoming,” Karam told NBC Sports during IndyCar media day last week.

“They worked well with me, I worked well with them, and we had a really fast car the first year. I think with more experience I can grow the car even better and apply to it that month.”

Karam’s departure from the Ganassi fold was certainly fascinating to read about, but doesn’t seem acrimonious. He described what happened that led to him going back on the open market.

“Obviously a couple articles went out about me and Ganassi parting ways. I think Dennis was on vacation, and he didn’t see them.

“When he came back in the country he got on Twitter, read some of those, and called us up right away. He threw out the idea, ‘Hey we have a sponsor for the 500, and I’m just curious if you’d like to run for me.’ Not having anything, and knowing Dennis and he’s a great guy, a great team owner, I said ‘Of course. I’d love to.’

“We got the whole deal banged out about in two weeks. Before Christmas, it was signed. To be honest, it was good to actually have a Christmas knowing I’d be racing something.”

Karam noted he wasn’t likely to be back on the IndyCar grid months before the season ended.

“Coming off a year with Ganassi where I was starting to find my feet, I hoped to get a couple years put together. But I knew it would be tough to put the money together again,” he said.

“I knew about a week after Sonoma, unless a miracle happened, I wasn’t going to be able to be back on that grid.”

That led to the Lexus opportunity, where Paul Gentilozzi contacted him and provided him the opportunity to reconnect with Scott Pruett, who he co-drove with in the handful of sports car races.

It’s a stable opportunity there, whereas as Karam noted about 2015, the instability of wondering whether he or Sebastian Saavedra would be in the fourth Ganassi car didn’t allow chemistry to build.

“The hard thing for me last year is that I was in the car for a week or two, then I’d get pulled out and Saavedra would go in,” Karam said. “Then right when I was starting to get momentum, I’d get pulled out and Saavedra went in. It was hard to really keep a consistency underneath me. I think we did a good job given the circumstances.

“It was tough and a lot of pressure being at 20 years old with a team that won the championship. It’s a case where you’re driving alongside guys that have won Indy 500s and championships, and there’s a lot to ask.

“There were a lot of times where I did things in practice sessions for the team, that Scott (Dixon) or Tony (Kanaan) couldn’t do because they had to focus on qualifying setup. They had to nail it. I was worrying about what am I gonna do to help give them a better car for the race.

“Sometimes I’d sacrifice my time practicing for them, which I was totally fine with, because I knew it’s one team and I wasn’t in the championship. Scott was.

“I did whatever I could. I learned so much, and if I was to go back and do the season over, with everything I now know, I think I could be consistently in the top 10.”

Karam also dispelled notions he can’t be a good road and street course racer. However, in such a deep field and with slim margin for error, any small mistakes were magnified.

“I’ve won races (on those) in the past,” he explained. “Honestly, when you make a mistake on an oval, it’s big. When you make a mistake on a road or street course, you take your wing off. You do this or that. When you do that you fall back, and it’s hard to regain your spot.

“For me, it’s one of those things where I have to drive as hard as I can out there. And you guys saw, I pushed the issue, pushed the aggression too much. Mistakes are going to happen.

“I sat on pole at Detroit, but it got taken away. NOLA I was P2 going into qualifying… then qualifying gets canceled. Barber, I had a broken wrist. St. Pete, broken wrist. I had four days of testing. I think even at Mid-Ohio… I’m running to get to next round and I make a mistake in qualifying and lose my head. So it’s all those things like that.

“If you take those experiences into another year, you grow and get better. Look at how Josef (Newgarden) grew. Josef’s the prime example of a team sticking with a young driver, helping him develop, and now he’s a championship-winning capable driver.”

While Karam’s hopes are limited to Indy – again – he should be a strong dark horse candidate from the off. A similar crew, with only a crew chief change, led by lead engineer Jeff Britton is set to field the No. 24 Gas Monkey Garage entry. Karam called it a “straight up DRR” effort without any technical alliance.

The story of how he and Gas Monkey Garage came together is equally fascinating, as is his relationship with Buddy Rice, who will play a role in the month of May for DRR.

“He’ll be spotting. He’s the guy within the camp that got this whole Gas Monkey Garage sponsorship together. It’s such a cool sponsor, by the way,” Karam said.

“It’s insane. When (Richard Rawlings) comes here for this race, it’s gonna be huge. But the attention it will bring is mega.

“I went to Dallas for the announcement. Met the guys. They’re really cool guys.

“I watched their show, honestly, way before I knew I’d get them on the side of the car. They sponsored a Pro Stock car. And I thought, ‘Man these guys need to get into IndyCar. Come on over!’ Sure enough two weeks later I get a call, and I couldn’t believe it.

“Buddy knows his way around here. I guess he’ll be my Dario (Franchitti) for the whole month.

“If you talk to Dario about tips on coaching me he’d give you some pretty funny stories. I think those two would laugh. I think (Buddy) will be in the sky in 1 or 3. He’s on board fully to lend a helping hand and help however he can.”

And for 2016, it’s a case where Sage Karam will attempt to impress again – however and wherever he can – in now two completely different disciplines.

Here’s what the best-dressed IndyCar drivers are wearing this year

new indycar series logo for 2016
(Photos by Chris Owens/IndyCar)
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It’s always a fun day when drivers in the Verizon IndyCar Series gather to get their official portraits for the upcoming season.

That took place once again last week during the annual preseason Media Day at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

While several drivers didn’t have their uniforms, likely for various reasons (Team Penske didn’t as they’ll roll liveries out throughout the month), we’ve collected shots of every driver expected to race full-time — and others who may only be part-time — on the circuit in 2016.

Here’s how the field will look this season (missing: Juan Pablo Montoya):

Spencer Pigot
Spencer Pigot
Gabby Chaves
Gabby Chaves
Mikhail Aleshin
Mikhail Aleshin
Graham Rahal
Graham Rahal
Jack Hawksworth
Jack Hawksworth
Carlos Munoz
Carlos Munoz
Takuma Sato
Takuma Sato
Will Power
Will Power
Ed Carpenter
Ed Carpenter
Conor Daly
Conor Daly
Helio Castroneves
Helio Castroneves
Sage Karam
Sage Karam
Sebastien Bourdais
Sebastien Bourdais
Marco Andretti
Marco Andretti
Matthew Brabham
Matthew Brabham
Ryan Hunter-Reay
Ryan Hunter-Reay
Scott Dixon
Scott Dixon
Josef Newgarden
Josef Newgarden
James Hinchcliffe
James Hinchcliffe
Tony Kanaan
Tony Kanaan
Charlie Kimball
Charlie Kimball
Simon Pagenaud
Simon Pagenaud
Max Chilton
Max Chilton

NHRA: Brittany Force (Top Fuel), Tommy Johnson Jr. (Funny Car) star in 4-day test in Phoenix

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If this past weekend’s Nitro Fuel test in suburban Phoenix is any indication, we’re likely to see a number of speed and elapsed time records set in Top Fuel and Funny Car in the 2016 season.

The four-day preseason test at Wild Horse Pass Motorsports Park saw a number of drivers show invigorated performance in both elapsed time and speed.

The most notable performances in Top Fuel came from 8-time champ Tony Schumacher, Dave Connolly and Doug Kalitta.

But it was Brittany Force, daughter of 16-time Funny Car champ John Force, who may have stolen the show in its entirety.

Brittany Force had the first (3.721 seconds at 319.07 mph), fourth (3.747/322.81) and sixth (3.758/317.64) quickest runs in Saturday’s final day of testing. In addition, Force had the fifth and sixth quickest runs (both at 3.721 seconds) of the entire four days.

In a sense, Brittany Force’s performance wasn’t a complete surprise. She has 11-time Top Fuel champion owner or crew chief Alan Johnson – and most importantly, Johnson’s celebrated equipment and motors – now behind her.

And how that improvement showed during the test.

Johnson and driver Shawn Langdon won last year’s season-opening race. And if her overall performance at Phoenix is any indication, Brittany Force could potentially follow in Langdon’s shoes and earn her first career Top Fuel win in the 2016 season-opening Circle K NHRA Winternationals, Feb. 11-14 at Auto Club Raceway in Pomona, California.

“I am definitely glad we are here in Phoenix testing,” Force said in a media release. “We were here for four days and I needed every single run that we made to make me feel more comfortable.

“Teaming up with Alan Johnson and Brian Husen as my crew chief has been great. They have made a lot of changes to this Monster Energy dragster. They run a whole different system that what we used to run. It takes some time to adjust to that and I am learning the car. It is starting to feel like home. … I am ready to get to Pomona.”

Schumacher had the quickest run of the four-day test (3.683 seconds/325.37 mph), followed by Connolly (3.714/330.15 mph) and Kalitta (3.716/327.35 mph). Schumacher also had the fourth-best run of the test (3.718/320.58 mph).

In Funny Car, Tommy Johnson Jr. saved the best for last, recording the quickest speed of the overall test on Saturday (3.874 seconds at 318.47 mph).

Had the test been a national event, Johnson would have set a record for quickest run ever in Funny Car. Matt Hagan holds the official record of 3.879 seconds, set at Brainerd, Minnesota last season.

“We had our entire team stay intact after last year and we have sort of picked up where we left off last year,” Johnson said. “The crew worked really hard during the offseason and I am just happy for the guys to make a run like that to close out testing. It’s a good reward for them for all their hard work.”

Other Funny Car drivers that shined on Saturday included Robert Hight (a career-best 3.885 seconds at an overall test-best speed of 329.34 mph and another run of 3.931/323.43 mph), Courtney Force (3.890/323.89 mph and 3.915/323.74 mph), John Force (3.914/327.35 mph, 3.927/323.66 mph and 3.930/328.14 mph) and Ron Capps (3.919/320.66 mph).

“I believe with how we finished the end of the year at Pomona what we learned here is going to make us so much better when we get back to Pomona,” Hight said.” I am so excited to get to the Winternationals. “We made career best runs here and we are in the ballgame.”

Added team owner John Force, “We have had a lot of change over the past couple of years but now I am focused on winning and getting the most out of all these race teams.”

* * *

Below are the quickest performances in both Top Fuel and Funny Car from Saturday at NHRA Nitro Spring Training:

TOP FUEL
3.721, 319.07 – Brittany Force
3.739, 288.87 – Clay Millican
3.745, 325.53 – Doug Kalitta
3.747, 322.81 – Brittany Force
3.748, 319.22 – Richie Crampton
3.758, 317.64 – Brittany Force
3.768, 297.88 – Antron Brown
3.770, 316.08 – Shawn Langdon
3.791, 320.13 – Antron Brown
3.802, 325.69 – J.R. Todd
3.839, 272.72 – Leah Pritchett
3.882, 251.67 – J.R. Todd
3.916, 256.75 – Terry McMillen
3.929, 255.00 – Troy Buff
3.935, 306.05 – Terry McMillen
4.123, 242.19 – Troy Buff

FUNNY CAR
3.874, 318.47 – Tommy Johnson Jr.
3.885, 329.34 – Robert Hight
3.890, 323.89 – Courtney Force
3.914, 327.35 – John Force
3.915, 323.74 – Courtney Force
3.919, 320.66 – Ron Capps
3.927, 323.66 – John Force
3.930, 328.14 – John Force
3.931, 323.43 – Robert Hight
3.962, 326.79 – Matt Hagan
3.972, 320.51 – Alexis DeJoria
3.982, 289.57 – Jack Beckman
3.983, 320.81 – Del Worsham
3.987, 319.29 – Ron Capps
3.993, 322.58 – Alexis DeJoria
3.999, 320.97 – Del Worsham
4.008, 273.94 – Cruz Pedregon
4.015, 316.01 – Brian Hough
4.070, 273.39 – Del Worsham
4.153, 252.24 – Jim Campbell
4.211, 225.60 – Matt Hagan

* * *

Below are the top 10 quickest runs overall in each category from the four-day test session:

TOP FUEL
3.721, 319.07 – Brittany Force
3.739, 288.87 – Clay Millican
3.745, 325.53 – Doug Kalitta
3.747, 322.81 – Brittany Force
3.748, 319.22 – Richie Crampton
3.758, 317.64 – Brittany Force
3.768, 297.88 – Antron Brown
3.770, 316.08 – Shawn Langdon
3.791, 320.13 – Antron Brown
3.802, 325.69 – J.R. Todd
3.839, 272.72 – Leah Pritchett
3.882, 251.67 – J.R. Todd
3.916, 256.75 – Terry McMillen
3.929, 255.00 – Troy Buff
3.935, 306.05 – Terry McMillen
4.123, 242.19 – Troy Buff

FUNNY CAR
1.  3.874, 318.47 – Tommy Johnson Jr.
2. 3.880, 325.77 – Jack Beckman
3. 3.885, 329.34 – Robert Hight
4. 3.890, 323.89 – Courtney Force
5. 3.894, 327.03 – Jack Beckman
6. 3.895, 325.06 – Jack Beckman
7. 3.904, 318.54 – Courtney Force
8. 3.912, 324.20 – John Force
9. 3.913, 326.16 – Robert Hight
10. 3.914, 327.35 – John Force

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McLaren GT captures major endurance win at Bathurst 12 Hour

BATHURST, AUSTRALIA - FEBRUARY 07: Race winner Shane van Gisbergen driver of the #59 Tekno Autosport McLaren 650S crosses the finish line to win the Bathurst 12 Hour Race at Mount Panorama on February 7, 2016 in Bathurst, Australia.  (Photo by Daniel Kalisz/Getty Images)
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There’s nothing to prove that Shane van Gisbergen isn’t actually a freak of nature with a big beard and a bigger right foot.

The man known as “The Giz” – the Australian V8 Supercars ace and McLaren GT factory driver – played an integral role in McLaren GT capturing a major endurance victory for the first time in more than 20 years, as he co-drove with Alvaro Parente and Jonathan Webb to secure the win in the Liqui-Moly Bathurst 12 Hour race in the No. 59 Tekno Autosports McLaren 650S GT3.

Van Gisbergen stole the headlines and the track record with a best time of 2:01.286 around Mount Panorama on Friday to capture the Allan Simonsen Pole Trophy.

“SVG” then walked the field in the early hours of Saturday’s (Sunday in Australia) race before electrical gremlins ground Parente to a halt after he got in, and cost them about 45 seconds.

Nevertheless, a near faultless drive from there – plus an abnormal strategy the rest of the way that eventually led to needing less time in the pits for the final stop – helped deliver the victory. For good measure, van Gisbergen added a 2:01.567 lap in the race itself.

Nissan, which won the race last year, finished second with a lineup of Katsumasa Chiyo, Florian Strauss and Rick Kelly in their Nissan GT-R NISMO GT3. The “Bentley Boys” made it on the podium with Guy Smith, Steven Kane and (British) Matt Bell in their Bentley Continental GT3.

The win is the first marquee endurance race victory for McLaren since its 1995 overall triumph at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, with the McLaren F1 GTR.