Scott Dixon looking to add to record win total at Mid-Ohio

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Eight races. Five wins.

Do a little bit of math and that equals a 0.625 winner percentage at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course for one Scott Dixon since the Verizon IndyCar Series returned to the central Ohio road course in 2007 (Dixon also raced twice in CART in 2001 and 2002, posting a best finish of fifth the latter year).

All told, 30 Verizon IndyCar/CART races have been run at the 13-turn, 2.258-mile road course in Lexington, Ohio since 1980 and it’s Dixon who has the most wins there, all since 2007 when open-wheel racing returned for the first time since 2003.

This weekend Dixon is looking not just for his first win since Texas in June, but also his first top-five finish.

In his last four starts, the three-time IndyCar champion has finishes of eight, sixth, seventh and 17th.

What better place to earn his third win of the year and Chip Ganassi Racing’s 100th IndyCar win than the track Dixon won at last year after starting dead last in a 22-car field?

“Mid-Ohio is definitely a big shift from what we’re typically used to atmosphere-wise, compared to a street circuit in a downtown situation,” Dixon said in a release. “Last year for us, I messed up big time in qualifying and had to start last, coming from the back of the grid and ended up winning the race.”

Dixon led 45 of the event’s 90 laps on his way to the win. In eight races, Dixon has led 201 laps, all of them coming in the races he won.

“(Scott) Dixon is obviously the master here at Mid-Ohio so I’m going to be picking his brain every step of the way,” said rookie Sage Karam, Dixon’s Ganassi teammate.

In the eight races since 2007, only the 2008 race won by Ryan Briscoe was not won by a Chip Ganassi driver. Dario Franchitti won in 2010 and Charlie Kimball earned his only IndyCar win there in 2013. So the team has a six-year win streak on the line going into the race.

“It’s tough to pass there but we had great strategy (last year) and a lot of help from Ryan Hunter-Reay, who spun out at the right time and caused the caution that we needed to switch our strategy and go on to win the race,” Dixon said.

“I think the team has 10 wins now there so it’s quite a milestone and obviously a place that I really enjoy.”

F1 2017 driver review: Esteban Ocon

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Esteban Ocon

Team: Sahara Force India
Car No.: 31
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 0
Best Finish: P5 (Spain, Mexico)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 87
Championship Position: 8th

A shining star in Mercedes’ junior programme, Esteban Ocon vaulted fellow youngster Pascal Wehrlein in the pecking order to secure a seat at Force India for 2017 – and boy, did he live up to the hype.

Ocon arrived at Force India with half a season of racing under his belt after his outings with Manor late in 2016, but wasted little time in settling in, scoring points on debut in Australia after winning a thrilling three-way fight with Nico Hulkenberg and Fernando Alonso.

The Frenchman spent much of the year close to teammate Sergio Perez – even if things did get a little too close in Canada, Baku and, finally, Spa, prompting the team to introduce team orders – and impressed the entire paddock with his displays.

While no podium was forthcoming, Ocon was often leading the midfield fight, enjoying three straight finishes ahead of Perez from Japan to Mexico. Given how well Perez is rated on-track in the paddock, to have convincingly beaten him in such fashion did a lot for Ocon’s reputation.

The term ‘Oconsistency’ also came into F1’s dictionary as he set a new record for consecutive finishes from his first race, with his retirement in Brazil ending the streak at 27 grands prix. It was also his first retirement in a single-seater race since the 2014 Macau Grand Prix.

The highlight moment arguably came at Monza, though, when Ocon stuck his Force India third on the grid through torrential rain in qualifying. While he would drop to P6 at the checkered flag, the display nevertheless cemented his place as one of F1’s rising stars.

Mercedes rates Ocon very highly, and with Valtteri Bottas’ future beyond 2018 already being questioned by the paddock, a good season could see the youngster move on up to the top table of F1 for 2019. His progression in the next 12 months will be fascinating to keep track of.

Season High: Lining up P3 on the grid at Monza after a rainy qualifying.

Season Low: Clashing with Perez in Baku, costing Force India a possible podium.