Photos courtesy NHRA

2016 NHRA season in review: Pro Stock Motorcycle’s Angelle Sampey

Leave a comment

MotorSportsTalk continues its season-ending reviews of the top drivers of the 2016 NHRA Mello Yello Drag Racing Series season.

From Dec. 12 through Jan. 4, we’ll feature one daily in-depth review of a driver that finished in the top-five in each of the four professional classes (Top Fuel, Funny Car, Pro Stock and Pro Stock Motorcycle), as well as a compendium of select other drivers that did not finish in the top-five.

The list of drivers we’ve already posted is below. Today, we feature Pro Stock Motorcycle rider Angelle Sampey:

2016_angelle_sampey_action

2016_angelle_sampey-1

Driver: Angelle Sampey

Age: 46

Hometown: Matthews, Louisiana

Team: Star Racing

Sponsor/motorcycle: Star Racing Buell

Crew chief: George Bryce

2016 season finish: Fourth in Pro Stock Motorcycle.

2016 season statistics: 16 races, 1 win, 3 runner-up, 4 semifinals, 5 quarterfinals. No. 1 qualifier 4 times. Round-by-round record: 26 wins, 15 losses.

Career statistics: 211 races, 42 wins, 31 runner-up, 41 semifinals, 56 quarterfinals. No. 1 qualifier 49 times. Round-by-round record: 399 wins, 168 losses. 1 DNQ. Three-time PSM champion (2000, 2001 and 2002).

What went right in 2016: After two part-time seasons (2014 and 2015), Sampey returned to full-time racing for the first time since 2008 (she did not compete from 2009 through 2013). Earned her first NHRA PSM win since 2007 and the 42nd of her career. … Also qualified for her first Countdown to the Championship playoff since 2007 (first year of the Countdown) and 2008. … Good friend with 2016 PSM champ and fellow Louisiana native Jerry Savoie (Sampey used to babysit for Savoie’s children before beginning her racing career).

What went wrong in 2016: Given this was Sampey’s first full-time season since 2008, there’s very little to say that she did wrong. Sure, there was a bit of rust, judging from her three first-round exits (nearly one-fourth of the 16-race PSM season), but there were also signs of the Angelle of old, the same Angelle who won three straight PSM championships from 2000-2002: She reached the quarterfinals or better in 13 of the 16 races, plus she was No. 1 qualifier in one-fourth of the races (4 of 16). It’s hard to say much of anything really went wrong for her.

What to look for in 2017: To come back full-time with technology that was completely different in 2016 than from her last full-time season in 2008, and then to finish fourth in the championship race, Sampey could very easily be considered the most valuable rider in PSM this past season. Given that she still has outstanding talent and cat-like reflexes, Sampey is almost guaranteed to be right in the middle of the 2017 championship chase. And few people would be surprised if she does win title No. 4. She is, after all, the winningest female racer in drag racing history – and there’s likely a lot more wins and potential championships still in her.

Season reviews already posted:

— Antron Brown (12/12)

— Ron Capps (12/13)

— Jason Line (12/14)

Jerry Savoie (12/15)

Doug Kalitta (12/16)

Tommy Johnson Jr. (12/17)

Greg Anderson (12/18)

Eddie Krawiec (12/19)

Steve Torrence (12/20)

— Matt Hagan (12/21)

— Shane Gray (12/22)

— Andrew Hines (12/23)

— J.R. Todd (12/24)

— John Force (12/25)

— Bo Butner (12/26)

— Angelle Sampey (12/27)

Follow @JerryBonkowski

F1 2017 driver review: Lance Stroll

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Team: Williams

Car No.: 18
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 1
Best Finish: P3 (Azerbaijan)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 40
Championship Position: 13th

Lance Stroll’s arrival in Formula 1 at the start of the 2017 was a far from smooth one despite a significant private testing program being undertaken in the months leading up to his grand prix debut.

Even with older hand Felipe Massa at Williams, Stroll looked uneasy behind the wheel of the FW40 car through the opening run of races as he failed to reach the checkered flag in any of his first three starts.

The Canadian was left deflated after his first decent effort in Bahrain was cut short after a clash with Carlos Sainz Jr., calling it his “rock bottom” moment – but things would turn around on home soil.

Stroll produced a stunning fight through the field to take an excellent P9 in Canada, proving his talent seen in Formula 3 the previous year and shushing many of his critics.

Better would follow two weeks later in Baku when Stroll became the youngest rookie in F1 history to score a podium, dodging a crazy race to finish third. It would have been second had he not lost a drag race against Valtteri Bottas to the line.

Stroll’s form then fluctuated greatly. He was sublime on occasion, the best examples being Monza, when he started a remarkable P2 on the grid and ended as the top midfielder in P7, or Mexico where he took a brilliant sixth.

But there were too many weekends he was a little anonymous. Sure, Williams didn’t have the best car this year, but perhaps a little better was expected from Stroll.

2018 will be an even bigger challenge as he looks to the lead the team when a new teammate arrives – and at only 19, it is a lot to handle. Nevertheless, there are positive signs to be found; you just need to look for them a little.

Season High: Taking a shock podium in Baku after dodging chaos in front.

Season Low: A poor opening two races in Australia and China.