Photo: United Autosports

Stefan Johansson’s latest blog: Recapping the 2016 season

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Stefan Johansson’s blogs were a source of good inspiration, insight, analysis and occasional humor throughout the 2016 season and with all that said, he put all of those elements together in one good, year-end blog to recap last year.

It’s latest conversation with Jan Tegler live on Johansson’s website, which continues what we’ve chronicled throughout the year on NBCSports.com.

Prior to a full look back at the 2016 season, Johansson got behind the wheel himself to end the year. The Swede competed along with Jim McGuire, Matt Keegan and Nico Rondet in one of United Autosports’ Ligier JS P3 chassis in the Gulf 12 Hours in Abu Dhabi. The pair of six-hour segments combine to make up a casual and laid-back, but still competitive, 12-hour enduro to cap off the campaign.

Johansson hadn’t raced at the Yas Marina Circuit or been in the LMP3 prototype, but was complimentary of both after his first outing.

“It was good fun. I hadn’t been in a proper car for a while. It’s been four years since I last raced a prototype. It felt a bit rusty to start with but as the weekend went on I started to get sharper. It started to feel pretty good in my last stint of the race. I guess if I had to rate myself over the weekend, I’d give myself a “5” out of 10. There’s definitely room for improvement but I really enjoyed it.

“The Ligier LMP3 is a great car, fantastic fun to drive. I really like the concept of the LMP3 class with economical, proper prototypes.

“The facility is outstanding and visually it looks amazing when you first see it but it’s not very interesting once you drive it. There are four 1st-gear corners, ten 2nd-gear corners and one each which are 3rd, 4th and 5th-gear. So, the track is really all 1st and 2nd gear corners with the exception of turns two and three which are somewhat tricky to get right.”

In looking back then on 2016, Johansson hit most of the high notes he did in other blogs throughout the year.

He reflected on Nico Rosberg’s retirement in the immediate aftermath of the moment. After a month has passed since, Johansson noted Rosberg went out at a rather good time.

“I personally respect the way he bowed out of F1. When you think about it, what would a guy like that want to do next. Would he want to hang in there trying to break every record?” he said.

“Everyone has their own morals, desires and ambitions in life but I think what Rosberg did was classy and graceful.

“He figured out what he had to do, did it his way and succeeded. That’s very admirable.”

As F1 looks ahead to a different range of cars in 2017, Johansson thinks more speed will come but not necessarily better racing.

“Yes, we’ll have a completely new style of cars for better or worse. The cars will probably look a lot better but whether they’re going to be better in terms of racing remains to be seen. I doubt it very much personally.

“You have to assume that Mercedes will maintain some kind of advantage but whenever there’s a reset like this there is an opportunity for someone else to get it more right than the others and that advantage then tends to stay for a while as we’ve seen with Mercedes the past few years.”

In the wake of Audi’s withdrawal from LMP1 in the FIA World Endurance Championship, Johansson said the GTE and LMP2 racing that still exists deserves a bigger stage.

“Much like F1, the development of the cars have reached a point where the racing is not very interesting any longer, the GTLM and LMP2 categories are far more interesting to follow than the LMP1 is now, with great drivers in both categories and great teams running the cars. It’s hard racing all the way,” he said.

“I personally think we’re at a point now where we could take the GTLM cars and make them the main category. The goal for the ACO has always been for the fastest cars to be in the 3 min 30sec lap time bracket, they seem to think this is the safe area to be in for overall lap times. The GT’s are in the low 50’s now and if you took of all the restrictors they would gain a significant amount of horsepower which could translate to a lap time somewhere in the mid 40’s probably.

“Allow each manufacturer to then develop the cars bit further, add some wider tires and wider wheel arches which would make the cars look a lot more cool and aggressive and the lap times would be in the 30’s in a couple of years. The racing would be awesome with a whole grid full of the same cars essentially.”

Of course these are but just a few of the nuggets from Johansson’s latest blog, with the full blog linked here.

Previous linkouts to Johansson’s blog on MotorSportsTalk are linked below:

Additionally, a link to Johansson’s social media channels and #F1TOP3 competition are linked here.

 

Takuma Sato’s likeness revealed on Borg-Warner Trophy (PHOTOS)

Photos; Walt Kuhn
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INDIANAPOLIS – Rather than the traditional December unveil, this year’s reveal newest likeness added to the Borg-Warner Trophy came Tuesday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum.

Takuma Sato got to see the result of the sculpting done by William Behrends and then turned from wax, clay and ceramic into sterling silver on Tuesday evening, as the winner of the 101st Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil saw his face revealed on the trophy.

Sato took the No. 26 Ruoff Home Mortgage Honda for Andretti Autosport to the win in thrilling fashion this year over Helio Castroneves, denying the Brazilian his fourth Indianapolis 500 victory in the process. It atoned for his near-miss in 2012, driving for Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing, the team he’ll return to in 2018.

It’s been a whirlwind last week-plus for Sato, doing the podium interviews at the Japanese Grand Prix, reflecting on his Indianapolis 500 triumph, then sharing the victory spoils with another Japanese pilot in Yoshihide Muroya, who won the Red Bull Air Race World Championship at Indianapolis this weekend.

Photos of Sato’s face on the most unique trophy in sports are below. This post will be updated following tonight’s full unveil. (All photos: Walt Kuhn)