during practice for the Verizon IndyCar Series Firestone 600 at Texas Motor Speedway on June 10, 2016 in Fort Worth, Texas.
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Newgarden, Rossi caution rush to create halo for INDYCAR

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Two of the Verizon IndyCar Series’ most talented, marketable and young American drivers – Josef Newgarden and Alexander Rossi – have cautioned INDYCAR to not rush into creating a halo device as part of the series’ new-for-2018 universal aero kit.

INDYCAR made two key announcements Thursday at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, as it released initial drawings of the universal kit and confirmed a three-year extension with Dallara for the base chassis. Both elements are part of INDYCAR’s overall “five-year plan” through 2021.

A halo, or windscreen option may well be part of the new kit. A halo was tried during a number of Formula 1 free practice sessions up-and-down that grid, but such a device has not been part of an IndyCar as yet.

Red Bull Racing’s Daniel Ricciardo models a “halo” in practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Belgium at Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps on August 26, 2016 in Spa, Belgium. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

“We are looking at a wind screen or a halo type application. Will that be on the car in ’18, I’m not sure, but we’re full speed ahead designing and developing as soon as possible,” INDYCAR President of Competition and Operations Jay Frye said today during a roundtable session in Detroit.

“But again, even that, because of our schedule being so diverse, maybe there’s two different applications. It would be difficult to run a halo at an oval, but what’s to say you couldn’t run a halo at road courses. Yeah, we’re looking at all different scenarios.”

Newgarden and Rossi, who were present at Detroit today as part of INDYCAR’s announcements and to help promote the series, both said it’s imperative that a thorough process be executed before any such device comes to INDYCAR.

FORT WORTH, TX - JUNE 10:  Josef Newgarden, driver of the #21 Fuzzy's Vodka Chevrolet, prepares to drive during practice for the Verizon IndyCar Series Firestone 600 at Texas Motor Speedway on June 10, 2016 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images for Texas Motor Speedway)
Newgarden at Texas. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images for Texas Motor Speedway)

“It’s obviously a sensitive topic, and I think you have a split — I don’t know if you’d want to call it split, understanding I’m not all drivers,” Newgarden said. “That could be my take on it, and this is a driver’s take, this is coming from me personally, Josef Newgarden.

“I love the heritage and the history of open-wheel racing. I respect it. It’s why I’m in an open-wheel car. I don’t mind jumping in an Indy car the way it is right now. That’s the way I fell in love with it as a kid. I’ve got no problem jumping in a race car as it currently sits and driving in it. I think anyone will pretty much tell you that for the most part. There’s always going to be inherent risks to racing. You’re never going to get away from that.

“I think the biggest thing INDYCAR is trying to do is put in their due diligence for what they’re trying to find. You can’t just make a knee-jerk reaction to something like this. You never know what type of knock-on effects you could have of just throwing something on a car and not being responsible about it.”

FORT WORTH, TX - JUNE 10:  Alexander Rossi, driver of the #98 Castrol Edge/Curb Honda, sits in his car during practice for the Verizon IndyCar Series Firestone 600 at Texas Motor Speedway on June 10, 2016 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images for Texas Motor Speedway)
Rossi at Texas. (Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images for Texas Motor Speedway)

“I mean, I agree with Josef. It’s very important that there is no rush decision,” Rossi, this year’s Indianapolis 500 champion, added. “There’s much smarter people than racing drivers doing the research on that, and I think the FIA in combination with INDYCAR is obviously really trying to figure it out. I mean, I stand with Josef in the sense that I have no issue getting in the cars and they are now, and the last thing I’d want to do is do something that could make the situation a whole lot worse.”

Both drivers have escaped harrowing moments of their own on superspeedways the last couple years.

Newgarden escaped an accident during practice for the 2015 Indianapolis 500 when his car got airborne and landed upside down through Turns 1 and 2. Even worse was his crash this year at Texas Motor Speedway when he was an unfortunate bystander when his friend Conor Daly got loose exiting Turn 4, which pitched Newgarden hard into the outside retaining wall.

Rossi had a scary moment last year, where his car catapulted over Helio Castroneves’ when he was launched out of the pits at Pocono Raceway, narrowly missing Castroneves’ head in the cockpit area. Castroneves’ teammate in NASCAR, Brad Keselowski, implored IndyCar to develop a halo upon seeing that accident.

Castroneves said afterwards in quotes distributed by INDYCAR, “Inside the car, I was actually more protected than what it looked like. Sometime people don’t realize the Verizon IndyCar series are so much about safety and today is the proof of that. Very glad that nobody got hurt.”

Newgarden offered the forward thinking view for how motivated he is to get into a car, regardless of what’s around the cockpit area.

“When I look at just going into 2017 I feel very comfortable to get back in the car. Always have,” he said. “I’ve got no problem with what we’re doing. I’m exciting to go racing in 2017 in an Indy car.

“But going into the future, I get to talk with JR Hildebrand every now and then, and he’s a really smart guy and fun to talk to, and I think he put it best that we’re going to be able to find a solution at some point that keeps within the spirit of open wheel racing and open cockpit cars and advance the safety of that.

“So what’s that going to look like? I think we’re working on it right now, and that’s exactly what Jay said. I think that’s coming down the pike, and I’m comfortable with that. I think we’re going to find something. We’re working on it. Formula 1 is doing the same thing.

“You don’t see them throwing something on the car right away, and that’s exactly what’s happening on the INDYCAR side, too?”

Haas confirms driver running order for Barcelona F1 tests

MONTMELO, SPAIN - FEBRUARY 24:  Romain Grosjean of France and Haas F1 drives during day three of F1 winter testing at Circuit de Catalunya on February 24, 2016 in Montmelo, Spain.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
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The Haas Formula 1 team has confirmed its driver running order for the two upcoming collective tests in Barcelona, Spain.

Haas will unveil its new car for 2017, the VF-17, on Sunday ahead of the first day of pre-season testing in Barcelona on February 27.

New signing Kevin Magnussen will get the first run in the VF-17, having joined Haas from Renault during the winter.

Magnussen will take the first two days in Barcelona before handing the reins over to Romain Grosjean, who returns to Haas after an impressive year leading its charge in 2016, for days three and four.

Magnussen will once again open proceedings for Haas at the second test, starting on March 7, and is also due to run on March 9. Grosjean takes March 8 and March 10, the latter being the final day of testing before the first race of the season in Melbourne, Australia.

“In our first test of the season, you try to make sure everything works as you designed it,” Haas team principal Guenther Steiner said.

“You just prove out whatever you did, and in the second part of the test, you try to get performance out of the car. Or, better said, you try to get performance as quickly as possible.

“First of all, make sure everything works. Everything is new on the car. The first test is quite important just from a reliability factor.

“You try to learn as much as possible about the car. You get the baseline on the car and you work off that baseline the rest of the year.”

Haas F1 Team – Barcelona Test Schedule

Test 1
February 27 – Kevin Magnussen
February 28 – Kevin Magnussen
March 1 – Romain Grosjean
March 2 – Romain Grosjean

Test 2
March 7 – Kevin Magnussen
March 8 – Romain Grosjean
March 9 – Kevin Magnussen
March 10 – Romain Grosjean

Ferrari confirms Bruni’s exit, signs Pier Guidi to AF Corse WEC team

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Ferrari has confirmed that Gianmaria Bruni will leave the company in June, making way for Alessandro Pier Guidi to join its AF Corse factory team in the FIA World Endurance Championship.

Bruni has been linked with a factory drive at Porsche for some time, with his exit from Ferrari by mutual consent being confirmed on Sunday.

“Ferrari and Gianmaria Bruni announce that, by mutual consent, they have early terminated their relationship,” a statement from Ferrari read.

“After a collaboration started in 2007, Bruni will leave Ferrari at the end of June of this year.

“Ferrari thanks Gianmaria Bruni for his professional contribution and wishes him the best of luck for his new challenges.”

Pier Guidi raced for AF Corse at Le Mans last year in the GTE Pro class, and also took part in five rounds of the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship in 2016 with Scuderia Corsa. The Italian also won the Rolex 24 at Daytona’s GTD class in 2014 driving a Ferrari 458 Italia.

Pier Guidi will race alongside James Calado in the No. 51 Ferrari 488 GTE in the WEC this season, leaving the second line-up of Sam Bird and Davide Rigon unchanged.

The new WEC season begins on April 16 at Silverstone in England.

Lewis Hamilton frustrated by sharing data with teammates in F1

SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - NOVEMBER 13:  Lewis Hamilton of Great Britain driving the (44) Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team Mercedes F1 WO7 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid turbo leads Nico Rosberg of Germany driving the (6) Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team Mercedes F1 WO7 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid turbo on track during the Formula One Grand Prix of Brazil at Autodromo Jose Carlos Pace on November 13, 2016 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.  (Photo by Clive Mason/Getty Images)
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Lewis Hamilton feels frustrated that sharing data between teammates has become commonplace in Formula 1, saying it is unfair to gain an advantage by studying someone else’s homework.

Most F1 teams operate an open garage policy that sees their drivers help each other find areas for improvement by studying data from both cars following sessions.

Hamilton revealed in a Q&A for UBS that he found this frustrating, and has asked his Mercedes team not to show him data from across the garage.

“I go out, do my laps, do all my homework – the other guy can see everything,” Hamilton said.

“I have asked my team: ‘I don’t want to see my teammate’s [data]’. I don’t feel it’s fair that he brings his A-game and I should be able to study his A-game on a computer.

“The other driver naturally may be able to do more or less than you are. But because of this data they can just copy you.

“He’s braking five metres later there, I’ll go out and I’ll try braking five metres later.”

Hamilton said that he missed the rawness of go-karting at times, with talent being the main difference between drivers instead of data analysis.

“That’s what I loved about go-karting. You weren’t able to do that and that was where just your raw talent is able to shine,” Hamilton said.

“I think it should be: ‘You hired me because I am the best, because I’ve studied, because I’ve won every class that I’ve been in, I’ve not missed one in terms of winning’.

“And you’re hiring whoever the next person is because they’ve hopefully won some things along the way as well and you’re hiring them for their ultimate skill all round.

“They should be able to go out there on their own and find it all themselves without you.

“If I can’t do it on my own then I’m not good enough and I don’t deserve to be there. And there are some drivers that don’t.”

Sebastien Buemi: Renault e.dams’ Formula E advantage is clear

2016/2017 FIA Formula E Championship.
Buenos Aires ePrix, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Saturday 18 February 2017.

Photo: Sam Bloxham/LAT/Formula E
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BUENOS AIRES, Argentina – Sebastien Buemi says that Renault e.dams’ current advantage over the Formula E field is clear for all to see after taking his third straight victory on Saturday in Buenos Aires.

Buemi followed his victories in Hong Kong and Marrakesh with a dominant display at the Puerto Madero street course in Argentina, taking the lead on lap six and never looking likely to lose the race from there.

The Swiss driver now stands 29 points clear at the top of the Formula E drivers’ championship after just three races, and is already the strong favorite to take a second crown in 2017.

“I think it’s clear that we have right now the best car, the best package. That obviously helps but it’s not everything,” Buemi said.

“You need to be doing good races, a good car and be a good team. I think as a package we’ve come out a bit better than the rest.

“We know that’s not going to last forever. If we can get as many points as possible as long as it lasts, that would be good.”

Buemi’s victory may have seemed straightforward, but the ex-Formula 1 driver revealed that the second stint of the race saw a number of problems arise that kept him on his toes.

“Today with the heat, there were many other things we had to manage, particularly the temperature of the battery,” Buemi said.

“We had some small issues on the brakes. It was quite difficult to actually drive the car.

“The car was not braking straight.”

To have finally won in Buenos Aires was also an important landmark for Buemi, having come close twice before.

“I’m quite happy because the first race here two years ago, I had pole and I did a mistake and ended up in the wall,” Buemi said.

“The second year I started last and finished second. In the end to get a win here is a great achievement. This race has never really gone our way but today it did.

“We’ll try to enjoy that a little bit and then look to Mexico.”