Amped is a good word to prep for Mazda Road to Indy presented by Cooper Tires, 2017. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

MRTI: Indy Lights, Pro Mazda, USF2000 2017 season previews

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While the Verizon IndyCar Series always gets the headline status at the start of the new season, it’s the Mazda Road to Indy presented by Cooper Tires’ start of a new year that always provides the first glimpse into the potential future stars you could see in IndyCar one day.

The traditional six-pack of races on the streets of St. Petersburg sets the tone for the start of the new year as the run for the more than $2 million in Mazda Motorsports Advancement Scholarships awarded at year’s end gets going.

With that, here’s a look ahead to the respective seasons:

Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires

Few would argue last year’s Indy Lights field was one of the strongest in quality in nearly a decade. Seven different drivers won races and six were in contention for the championship with just two race weekends to go.

There’s always going to be a bit of upheaval with a new season and of those top six drivers, only two of them return for 2017, which means both enter as the joint preseason title favorites.

Might Kaiser be the next Indy Lights driver we see arrive in IndyCar? Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
Kyle Kaiser could emerge as this year’s champion. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

In a nutshell, Kyle Kaiser has consistency and stability in his pocket while Santiago Urrutia has speed, car experience and a change of scenery that he didn’t have this time last year.

The 21-year-old Californian, Kaiser won his first two races at the Phoenix oval and Monterey road course, scored poles there and on the streets of St. Petersburg and finished third in points. A well-rounded driver, Kaiser has grown in maturation over the season and if he can turn some of his sixth places of a year ago into top-fives – he had six of them in 16 races – he could win the title for Juncos Racing.

Urrutia, meanwhile, is in a title-or-bust scenario for his sophomore season. The Uruguayan has speed to burn and the confidence of knowing he can win in Indy Lights, which he did at three different permanent road courses last year.

Urrutia moves to Belardi for 2017. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
Urrutia moves to Belardi for 2017. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

He and engineer Tim Neff move to Belardi Auto Racing in a move that should shore up his oval progression; this has been the type of track that’s given him trouble the last two years. Improve on ovals, and the title is there for the taking after his tough loss a year ago, which he handled with maturity beyond his 20 years.

The five other returning drivers for 2017 – Shelby Blackstock, Zachary Claman De Melo, Dalton Kellett, Neil Alberico and Juan Piedrahita – finished between eighth and 13th in points a year ago with only one combined podium finish (Kellett was third at the Freedom 100).

Of those five, you’d have to say Alberico has the highest upside given his usual year-to-year growth in both USF2000 and Pro Mazda when he contended for the title then, and with mechanical issues stunting his first year, he has a chance with Carlin to emerge as that team’s lead driver. Blackstock (Belardi) and Claman De Melo (Carlin) switch teams this offseason. None of these five would be considered a preseason title favorite but two to three of them, at least, should move forward from where they were a year ago.

The eight rookies set to debut at St. Petersburg boast a fascinating mix of talent, speed, personality and family history that will serve Indy Lights well.

Telitz keeps his eyes on the prize. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
Telitz keeps his eyes on the prize. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

Belardi Auto Racing fields Aaron Telitz, the Wisconsinite who completes his journey up to final step on the Mazda Road to Indy presented by Cooper Tires ladder after winning races in USF2000 and winning last year’s Pro Mazda championship. Telitz, engineer Kent Boyer and the John Brunner-led, Brian Belardi-owned team have clicked during the offseason and he should be an instant contender.

Andretti Autosport has two traditional rookies in Nico Jamin and Ryan Norman. Jamin, the 2015 USF2000 champion and the only other driver in Telitz and Pato O’Ward’s zip code in Pro Mazda last year, will no doubt impress in his step up to Indy Lights, and like Telitz seems a probable first-time winner at some stage this year. Norman enters rather under-the-radar but has experience in the Atlantic series and will look to surprise as the year progresses.

The eyes, the helmet is all Herta... this one's Colton instead of dad Bryan though. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
The eyes and the helmet is all Herta… this one’s Colton instead of dad Bryan though. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

There’s a third rookie from the Andretti stable that will draw a lot of interest in Colton Herta, who at 16 will be one of the youngest drivers in series history and will be the top family storyline going into the year. Herta, the son of Bryan Herta, drives for Michael Andretti (himself the second generation in a three-generation racing family) and George Michael Steinbrenner IV, who brings that family’s winning history from the New York Yankees into racing with the Andretti Steinbrenner Racing entry. Young Herta has a lot of experience in Europe and is back Stateside for the first time since 2014, when he raced in USF2000.

Carlin has a pair of rookies in Garth Rickards and Matheus Leist. Rickards, the Pennsylvania native, will look to do what RC Enerson did in 2015 – step up from USF2000 to Indy Lights directly and win a race. Rickards’ qualifying didn’t always bare itself out in great USF2000 results so if he can keep his qualifying performance up in these cars, he could shine. Leist, the teenaged Brazilian, moves Stateside after winning last year’s BRDC British F3 title. He will have to learn quickly.

Lastly a pair of Latin American drivers will be keen to impress. Argentine teenager Nico Dapero came on quickly at the end of last season with Juncos Racing in Pro Mazda and will continue to grow with the team this year. Meanwhile Mexican teenager Pato O’Ward, confirmed only for St. Petersburg with Team Pelfrey, looks to upset the apple cart with nothing to lose and everything to gain in his own step up from Pro Mazda.

The 16-race schedule features no races on the West Coast with Phoenix and Monterey both dropped (probably to Kaiser’s chagrin), and Gateway added. The Freedom 100, Iowa, Gateway and Watkins Glen races are single events with the rest doubleheaders for a total of three oval, four street course and nine road course races.

Four of the five returning teams all won races last year (Pelfrey the exception) and all five made the podium at least once. While a 15-car grid falls short of continuing to build upon the 16 that started last season, it is fortuitous most of the equipment from the disbanded Schmidt Peterson operation found a home elsewhere on the grid for 2017, and keeps the quality of the field still relatively high.

Kaiser and Urrutia enter as the drivers who immediately should be considered preseason title favorites, but the number of rookies that could win races is very intriguing as well. And if any of the other returning drivers make that next step forward this year, then we may well be writing about the seven different winners once again.

Pro Mazda Championship Presented by Cooper Tires

One of the challenges within the Mazda Road to Indy presented by Cooper Tires is that as drivers move on, either further up the ladder to Indy Lights or to sports cars, sometimes one of the three MRTI series is hit with a lower car count than you’d hope.

That series happens to be Pro Mazda in 2017, in the final year of its existing chassis with the rotary powered Mazda engine in the back, with car counts only scratching or exceeding the surface of double-digit entries.

But as Indy Lights struggled with single-digit fields as recently as 2013, and is now almost double that, this is very much a “survive and advance” year for Pro Mazda before the new Tatuus PM-18 debuts next season. And if last year with a similarly low car count is any indication, the loss in quantity can be offset by good quality.

Will the Pro Mazda field be seeing Martin's Soul Red up front this year? Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
Will the Pro Mazda field be seeing Martin’s Soul Red up front this year? Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

Indeed four of the top five from last year’s Pro Mazda field – Telitz, O’Ward, Jamin and Dapero – have advanced into Indy Lights this year. It leaves a gaping hole at the top of Pro Mazda, of course, but one that several key drivers will look to fill.

USF2000 champion Anthony Martin should be at the head of the field from the off, as he’ll be back in a single-car effort for Cape Motorsports. The Australian overachieved in a single-car team with John Cummiskey Racing in 2015 in USF2000 and translated what he learned then into moving into title ascension with Cape last year. He’ll have full focus on his car this year and because he won’t be in the position of having teammates take points off each other, he has a good chance to match Matthew Brabham as the last driver to win USF2000 and Pro Mazda titles in successive years (2012-2013).

Or will Pelfrey yellow rule the day once again? Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
Or will Pelfrey yellow rule the day once again? Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

Team Pelfrey, meanwhile, will look for its third straight title with three new full-season drivers. The lone holdover is TJ Fischer, the Californian who made a midseason step up from USF2000 to Pro Mazda and learned the ropes. He should make a step forward this year. Los Angeles-based Russian Nikita Lastochkin rarely featured in two seasons of USF2000 but should do better here. The wild card is teenaged Brazilian Carlos Cunha, new to the series and the tracks, but a fast prospect who could surprise. Urrutia and Telitz – Pelfrey’s last two champions – have worn Soul Red for Mazda in Indy Lights the following year.

The remainder of the field does not, at present, boast significant title prospects but will look to intermingle at the top when the opportunity presents itself. That said, a surprise or two could emerge from the late entries.

An additional incentive program announced by series operators Andersen Promotions helps, as does the fact it’s only a six-weekend, 12-race schedule with a tripleheader at Mid-Ohio and single oval at Gateway joined by doubleheaders at St. Petersburg, Indianapolis, Road America and Watkins Glen.

Cooper Tires USF2000 Championship Powered by Mazda

While Indy Lights features a bevy of rookies and Pro Mazda features a number of new potential race winners, it’s USF2000 that features both, plus the new Tatuus USF-17 chassis that figures to throw a monkey wrench in the formbook for 2017.

Thompson (90), Gabin (91) and Franzoni (9) among three of the returnees. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
Thompson (90), Gabin (91) and Franzoni (9) among three of the returnees. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

More than 20 cars figure to start the season opener at St. Petersburg this weekend and there’s about half the field, split between returning drivers and talented rookies, who could make some noise.

Cape Motorsports has won the last six series titles but faces a threat to its supremacy in 2017.

The veterans still in USF2000 are all hungry for different reasons. Three drivers enter their third years, and all of Parker Thompson (Exclusive Autosport), Luke Gabin (Exclusive) and Ayla Agren (Team Pelfrey) have the most race experience within the series. Whether that translates well with the new car, however, remains to be seen.

Series sophomores Robert Megennis (Pelfrey), Lucas Kohl (Pabst Racing) and Dakota Dickerson (Newman Wachs Racing) all impressed at various points last year and only Megennis returns to the same team in 2017. It would not be a surprise to see any of these three win their first races.

But it’s the rookies, who without the background of having the previous car and needing to re-learn this one, and with wide-eyed optimism and enthusiasm, who figure to make a big splash.

Askew is overflowing with promise. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
Askew is overflowing with promise. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

Chief among them is Oliver Askew, who’s a name you should put on your radar sooner rather than later given his star potential. The Floridian has won the Team USA Scholarship and the USF2000 shootout in successive months, and excelled in his first official test with Cape at Homestead-Miami. He’ll win races, the question being when they’ll happen and if it’s enough to give Cape a seventh straight title.

Newman Wachs’ Andre Castro and Pabst Racing’s Rinus Van Kalmthout are two rookies who also figure to make some noise. Two others made one weekend appearance apiece last year, Kaylen Frederick of Team Pelfrey and Devin Wojcik of ArmsUp Motorsports.

The rest of the rookies are sprinkled in at Cape, ArmsUp, DE Force Racing, RJB Motorsports, Pabst, Benik, John Cummiskey Racing and Exclusive Autosport. So there’s plenty of first-year drivers to go around.

Like Pro Mazda, USF2000 only has one oval on its schedule, in Iowa instead of Gateway. That race and Watkins Glen are single races with the rest doubleheader weekends.

You might not know the USF2000 names now but as recent drivers like Spencer Pigot, Matthew Brabham, RC Enerson and Sage Karam have proved, IndyCar is within reach down the road.

NASCAR, not Indy 500, on Jenson Button’s radar after Fontana visit

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Jenson Button would like to enter a NASCAR event in the future after enjoying a visit to March’s Auto Club 400 at Fontana, but has no interest in following former McLaren Formula 1 teammate Fernando Alonso into the Indianapolis 500.

2009 world champion Button will make a one-off return to F1 this weekend while Alonso races in the Indy 500, with the Briton believing he had made his final Grand Prix start in Abu Dhabi last year.

Button has not raced in any discipline since the season finale at Yas Marina, instead preferring to focus on his triathlon training after qualifying for the upcoming world championships.

When asked if he would consider following Alonso’s lead and entering the ‘500 in the future, Button revealed he would prefer to try out NASCAR.

“Indy’s not really been something that I’ve ever thought about. Personally, I was surprised that Fernando was interested in doing it, but we all like different things,” Button said.

“I would like to race in NASCAR, I think that would be fun. I went along to one of the races this year, Jimmie Johnson invited me, and I had a great time.

“I loved seeing the show as it is, and it’s very different to other motorsports. Equally, it’s a challenge, it’s a massive challenge. Who knows?”

Button was a guest of Johnson at Auto Club Speedway back in March over the Australian Grand Prix weekend, with the Briton noting at the time that there was much F1 could learn from NASCAR.

Button added that he would also like to enter the 24 Hours of Le Mans one day, but only in a competitive seat such as the one Nico Hulkenberg had with Porsche when he won the race in 2015.

“We’re racing drivers, we’re not just F1 drivers, and we like trying different sports,” Button said.

“For me, I would like to do Le Mans one day. I think it would be a great experience, a great team atmosphere. Obviously it has to be the right opportunity like Nico had.

“And then there’s other motorsports that I love like rallycross as well. So there are many things. But Indy hasn’t been up there for me for many different reasons.”

Hamilton and Vettel’s friendly rivalry faces test in Monaco

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MONACO (AP) The chummy rivalry between Formula One champions Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel could be tested at this weekend’s Monaco Grand Prix, an unforgiving circuit where drivers are often pushed to the limit.

After five races, four-time F1 champion Vettel is six points clear of three-time champion Hamilton. They have two wins each and are relishing what is, surprisingly, their first championship tussle.

When Vettel was dominating for Red Bull, winning his titles from 2010-13, Hamilton lagged behind with McLaren. As Hamilton started dominating for Mercedes the following year, Vettel struggled with Red Bull. After switching to Ferrari in 2015, the German driver failed to significantly challenge Hamilton or his former Mercedes teammate, Nico Rosberg.

Although they share a total of 99 F1 wins, this is the first year Hamilton and Vettel have really gone head-to-head on track.

“You have to respect if other people do a good job,” Vettel said. “We’re very different. But I think we have a very strong connection.”

Hamilton has been equally praiseworthy.

“To have that close battle with him, with a four-time champ, is awesome,” the British driver said. “This is what the sport needs to be every single race.”

Fans are thrilled, and it is equally a relief for Hamilton to be challenging a driver he respects so much and, additionally, one from another team.

For the past three years, Hamilton was embroiled in a tense fight with Rosberg and their thorny relationship caused frictions within Mercedes.

An air of relief has swept through Mercedes since Rosberg retired after winning last year’s title. Not because he was unpopular, but because the team no longer has to deal with an ongoing saga that the media feasted on.

“This season I have re-discovered why I love the sport,” said Toto Wolff, the head of Mercedes motorsport. “We are in a massive fight with Ferrari.”

In other words, the fight has been taken outside of Mercedes itself and the rivalry with Vettel is more healthy.

However, an incident in Spain two weeks ago, where Hamilton won ahead of Vettel, suggested cracks could start appearing in the smooth facade of their relationship.

Vettel came perilously close to nudging Hamilton off the track as they fought for space heading into a turn. Hamilton had seemed somewhat irked by Vettel’s aggression – although it was exactly the kind of in-your-face driving Hamilton revels in.

With the F1 title shaping into a two-way race, neither can afford a slip.

That will heighten the pressure on both in glitzy Monaco, where F1 lovers mingle with millionaires, and which Wolff describes as “the crown jewel” of F1.

The smallest braking mistake on a tight and sinewy 3.4-kilometer (2.1-mile) circuit through the winding streets of Monte Carlo, past its famed casino and around its glittering, yacht-laden harbor, can send a distracted driver into the barriers.

“There is no such thing as a low risk lap in Monaco, it doesn’t exist if you want to be fast,” said Red Bull driver Max Verstappen, who crashed in last year’s race.

With overtaking notoriously difficult, pole position holds increased value. That makes qualifying crucial, where drivers juggle speed with not pushing the car too hard.

“It is a mentally exhausting weekend,” Mercedes driver Valtteri Bottas said. “One mistake will cost you.”

But one advantage for drivers this year is that the Pirelli tires are far more durable, increasing time on track and limiting pit stops.

Still, that advantage is offset by another factor: the size of the cars.

F1 rule changes this year led to cars being made faster and wider. On a narrow track, this poses “a massive challenge” when pushing the car close to the limit, Hamilton said.

“It’ll be a real test of your awareness of where the car is,” the Englishman said. “You need to be sharp and clear.”

Ganassi team confident amid high expectations for Indy 500

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Chip Ganassi Racing was uncharacteristically quiet during last year’s 100th Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil. Tony Kanaan was the only member of the team to lead laps, heading the field for 19 circuits. Charlie Kimball took advantage of a strategy similar to winner Alexander Rossi’s to finish fifth, while Scott Dixon was never in contention much of the day and finished eighth. Max Chilton, in his first “500,” soldiered home in 15th.

For the 101st running of the Greatest Spectacle in Racing, the team has a much different outcome in mind. Once again partnered with Honda, which had the superior speedway package last year, Chip Ganassi’s outfit appears to be in a much stronger position heading into this year’s race.

Most notably, Scott Dixon captured the pole, with Tony Kanaan joining him in the Fast Nine shootout before qualifying seventh. And while Chilton and Kimball start 15th and 16th, they could easily be dark horses heading into race day.

Team owner Chip Ganassi was bursting with enthusiasm when asked about returning Indianapolis Motor Speedway during a May 19 press conference.

“I mean, I’m excited. I mean I think — you know, when you come back here to Indianapolis, it’s the real thing. It’s what we’re all about. It’s why we got in this sport in the first place, is because of the Indianapolis 500. We want to win this race, and that’s what we’re here to do,” he asserted.

Mike Hull, managing director of the Verizon IndyCar Series side of Chip Ganassi’s operation, detailed the team’s success, and potential for more success, is down to people and communication, and that on the driving front, he thinks they have all their bases covered.

“In order for race drivers to win races, they have to support their teammates and their teammates have to give very unselfishly to each other when you race at a major event like this one,” Hull explained. “And it’s really, really neat to see these four drivers interact with each other knowing full well that one of the other ones could win. That’s very special, and that’s what we have at Chip Ganassi Racing.”

Dixon, the polesitter and holder of one of the fastest speeds Indianapolis Motor Speedway has seen since 1996, is not only Ganassi’s longest tenured driver but the team’s best bet for success on race day, in tandem with engineer Chris Simmons. Dixon alluded to missed opportunities (such as in 2015, when an overheating problem dropped him from the lead late in the race, and in 2011, when fuel strategy put paid to his chances) as added motivation to secure his second “500” triumph.

Scott Dixon might be the favorite going into Sunday’s Indianapolis 500. Photo: Indycar

“I think we came up short in a couple where we could have maybe stolen a couple wins there which would have definitely helped that list. But yeah, you know, it’s all focused right now on this event and preparing as well as we can,” he said.

“I think the first couple of days were definitely trying in a lot of ways but I think we found some good headway, but it’s the goal. We finished second here a couple of times and it’s almost the worst place to finish when you come so close, especially under caution.”

One might assume that as a former winner, Dixon may hold a mental edge on most of the field. But, he later revealed that isn’t necessarily the case.

“Every year is very different. The target constantly moves. The situations change. How the race plays out changes,” he said. “I think because you’ve had the sense and the feeling of that victory, you want it that much more again. So I think it maybe even adds to it.”

Teammate Tony Kanaan, who won this race in 2013, echoed those sentiments. “To me every year it’s like the first year,” he added. “I mean, I don’t get to think that I won this thing until Monday. If everything goes wrong, I might, you know, just say ‘All right, at least I won one.’ That’s the way I really think. But up until then I still get as nervous as I was the first time. I still want to win as bad as if I hadn’t won.”

Tony Kanaan is looking for his second Indy 500 triumph. Photo: IndyCar

So far, Kanaan has endured a difficult 2017 campaign. With only two finishes inside the top ten, he languishes back in 11th in the championship. Still, he recognizes that this year presents as strong a chance as he’s ever had at Indianapolis, and the strength of Ganassi’s organization creates a heightened sense of pressure to perform.

“I got extremely lucky when after I won the “500” I got hired by Chip and Mike’s organization. I think I’m in the best place I’ve ever been. So they cut my work in half by doing that,” he added. “They give me great cars, great people, and it’s just an awesome place to be. So for me, you know, I think I have one of my best shots this year.”

Outside of Dixon and Kanaan, Charlie Kimball and Max Chilton are often the overlooked men of Chip Ganassi’s four-car armada. However, each has shown the potential for success.

Kimball, a former IndyCar race winner, has very quietly established himself at the Indy 500 with consecutive finishes inside the top five (third in 2015 and fifth in 2016) to go along with two other finishes inside the top ten (eighth in 2012, ninth in 2013). Like Kanaan, Kimball has endured a difficult 2017 season, one in which he didn’t even make it through the opening lap in any race until Round 3 at Barber Motorsports Park.

Charlie Kimball has quietly put together a strong record at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Photo: IndyCar

Kimball explained that his success is down to a simple love of the race track, and that the surrounding team may be the most vital component to ending the day in victory lane.

“I love racing around here. And on Race Day the fact that it’s a 500-mile event: it’s challenging mentally, physically, not just for us as drivers but especially for the teams, the guys on the stand, the engineers, the strategists, the guys, the crew that go over the wall. I mean, that focus that they need for those six, seven-plus stops is critical to the job we do on the racetrack,” he said.

And for Max Chilton, who has raced at such world-renowned events as the Monaco Grand Prix and the 24 Hours of Le Mans, competing at the Indy 500 left an indelible impression on him.

“I’ve done some big races, Le Mans 24 Hours, Monaco Grand Prix a number of times, but this one stands out last year,” he said. “(It was) the 100th running of the biggest race we’ve ever had here. To me that was still very incredible.”

An Indianapolis 500 victory would the first career IndyCar win for Chilton. Photo: IndyCar

While a victory for him would be an upset of sorts, Chilton knows he has everything he needs to do so. “I’m going to work as hard as I can. I feel like we got the car in a good place (in practice) and I can’t wait to be here on the 28th of May and be zooming around,” said the Briton, who was fastest during Monday practice.

The team has moved a number of pieces around – Kanaan and Kimball swapped engineers with Eric Cowdin coming back to Kanaan and Todd Malloy going over to Kimball – and other crew members have also been rotated. But as Hull explained, that comes from the strength of depth within the organization based on Woodland Drive in Indianapolis.

“We’re lucky, we have quality people in all positions, so we can do that,” Hull said. “But what it does is it provides fresh thinking even though the thinking is in the same room. And it’s all about the interaction of people. That’s what teamwork is all about and teams of people are all about. They have to pinch each other every day to remember what the priority actually is, and our priority is to win. We try to match the people up that we think can do that.”

An Indy 500 victory in 2017 would be the fifth for Chip Ganassi Racing, the previous four coming at the hands of Juan Pablo Montoya (2000), Scott Dixon (2008), and Dario Franchitti (2010, 2012).

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Button well-prepared, jovial ahead of Formula 1 comeback

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Jenson Button says he feels well-prepared to make his one-off return to Formula 1 in this weekend’s Monaco Grand Prix despite not yet driving the 2017-spec McLaren car.

Button stepped back from his McLaren seat at the end of 2016 and looked to have made his last F1 appearance, having agreed to remain with the team as an ambassador and reserve driver if requied.

The 2009 F1 world champion was called into action by McLaren following Fernando Alonso’s shock decision to enter the 101st Indianapolis 500, skipping the Monaco Grand Prix in order to do so.

Button made his first appearance in the F1 paddock since last November’s Abu Dhabi Grand Prix on Wednesday, facing questions in the FIA’s pre-race press conference which he answered with a mix of good humor and, at times, sarcasm.

One of the biggest concerns surrounding Button’s return has been his level of preparation, with the Briton turning down the offer to test the MCL32 car last month following the Bahrain Grand Prix – meaning his first taste of F1’s new-style 2017 cars will come on Thursday in Monaco practice.

Button isn’t worried, though, believing the additional running in Bahrain wouldn’t have benefitted him a great deal given the drastically different nature of the circuit.

“Preparation has been good, apart from I haven’t driven the car with these new regulations,” Button acknowledged.

“So it’s not perfect, but the option was to do half a day in Bahrain which I thought was absolutely useless for me to do, completely different type of circuit.

“I said to the team I think it’s best if I do a few days in the simulator. Obviously as drivers we love the simulator, so I was raring to go… I spent a lot of time in the simulator just getting a feel for it.

“It’s been interesting. Most of the stuff’s the same, but there are a few things that are obviously different. Different in regulations and it changes from year to year, technology and what have you.

“A few things to learn, but it’s still a racing car. Just got to get used to [the car] being a bit wider.”

Button’s return comes at a time when McLaren is at a low point – quite literally – as it sits at the bottom of the constructors’ championship with a score of zero following the first five races of the season.

Much of the team’s struggles have stemmed from its Honda power unit, which has lacked both reliability and performance so far this season, leaving Alonso and teammate Stoffel Vandoorne ailing in races.

Monaco is set to present McLaren its best chance yet of points, with the tight and twisting nature of the street course making any frailties on the engine side seem less severe.

Yet for Button, there is no pressure to get McLaren off the mark in 2017 and overhaul Sauber, who recently moved off the foot of the teams’ table following Pascal Wehrlein’s run to eighth in Spain.

“Definitely not,” Button said when asked if he felt under any pressure for his comeback. “I’m very relaxed. Very excited, actually. It’s interesting coming back for one grand prix. It being Monaco, it’s very special.

“I’ve won here before, I’ve lived here for 17 years. I’ve had some really good experiences here. It’s exciting. But I don’t feel any pressure, not at all. I will get in the car and do the best job I can, that’s what I’m here to do.

“And everything I do in life is the same. You want to be competitive, you want to be getting the best out of yourself and the best out of the equipment and the team you are working with. So that hasn’t changed.

“The car seemed to be working well in Barcelona in qualifying. Fernando did a good job, but I think it still proves the car itself is working well. I drove in the simulator and I drove the upgrade, which I was misquoted on, by the way. I drove that upgrade and it was a definite improvement.

“There are more improvements here as well. If it’s all straightforward this weekend then we should be reasonably competitive.”