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With aesthetics fixed, F1 chiefs turn attention back to engine sound


Following the first official on-track running of the 2017 Formula 1 season in Australia on Friday and the first chance for the majority of fans to see the new-style cars in action on TV, what we already thought we knew became fact.

The new technical regulations for 2017 are awesome.

The drivers had already given the quicker cars a big thumbs up after testing, with the quicker lap times and more physical nature of their chariots only increasing the challenge and satisfaction on offer.

But now the fans have seen that as well. Typical on-board cameras and classic corner angles make for easy comparison through the years. Watching on TV, it looked to some as though they’d hit the ‘1.5 x’ fast-forward on their remote. The cars were that quick.

They look good too. After finding big gains over the winter, the bulkier, angrier look that all 10 chassis offer – combined with the fatter tires provided by Pirelli – has made F1 look sexy again. It’s been a big, big success for the sport.

As necessitated by the nature of competition, F1 doesn’t simply go ‘job done’ and put its feet up. Instead, attention turns to the next fix that is required: the sound.

Since the introduction of the V6 turbo power units in 2014, the sound produced by the F1 field has been a huge point of contention. F1’s push down a greener, more efficient route – as requested by car manufacturers looking to keep with the times – came at the expense of its iconic, piercing chorus of V12, V10 and V8 engines.

It was a matter up for debate in Friday’s team principals’ press conference in Australia, with a number of F1’s biggest players hitting the same note: something has to change.

“I think that rather than focus on the looks I would prefer to focus on the sound,” Red Bull chief Christian Horner (pictured above) said.

“I think the best sounding car we have here this weekend is a 12-year old Minardi [show car] that 12 years ago had the worst sounding engine in it and was hopelessly uncompetitive.

“I think that when you hear the acoustics of a V10, you’ve only got to go and see the faces around the circuit to see what it embodies in fans of Formula 1, so I would be far more focused on addressing that element than the aesthetics of the cars at the moment.”

Mercedes’ Toto Wolff added: “Like Christian says, if we can work on the sound of the car and if we look into a future generation of engines that is something that needs to be considered.

“There wasn’t enough emphasis on the sound in the past and if we can combine great technology, affordable technology with a lot of horsepower and a good sound, that would be really ticking a box.”

On a weekend that has seen F1’s new owner, Liberty Media, enjoy a strong presence in the paddock through the sport’s CEO and chairman Chase Carey, commercial chief Sean Bratches and sporting managing director Ross Brawn, the future path for the sport has been debated frequently.

A number of team chiefs came together for a Strategy Group meeting earlier in the week, where a number of issues were discussed as Liberty begins to settle in.

For Ferrari’s Maurizio Arrivabene, the constant discussions are an important process on the way to making meaningful change to F1, particularly when it comes to cost control, on-track performance and the series’ entertainment.

“Reducing the cost and increasing the performance, they are the two key factors,” Arrivabene said.

“Then, of course, it’s an entertainment, what we are doing here. It’s part of the entertainment business. Everybody, they’re open to discuss and talk about new ideas in the appropriate places.

“At the moment we have governance, so talking to everybody to help the sport to grow is fine until we are all aligned to the actual governance. Or, if we want to change it, we have to sit and discuss about this.”

The focus on entertainment was something Horner welcomed, believing F1 to have become too technical in its ways, risking confusion among fans.

“I personally think there is far too much emphasis on technology at the moment and we’re spectacularly bad at communicating that,” Horner said.

“I think the average fan and viewer understands very little about the technology that’s in a Formula One car which, as Maurizio alluded, is enormously expensive.

“So, I think the Commercial Rights Holder, it’s their business at the end of the day. They have to decide what they want the sport to be and, if the route is fan-attraction and creating a really exciting product, and at the end of the day they want to create great content on TV then it’s vital they come up with an outline of what their vision of Formula 1 is.

“And then, obviously, the FIA have a regulatory position and the teams need to be involved in that process. We have a process that that can be achieved in if two of the three parties agree.”

The next few years are set to feature plenty of political jostling as the teams, Liberty and the FIA all put forward their visions for the future of F1.

While there will be disparity, consensus will likely be found on the engine front. Although the V6 turbos are hardly unpleasant, as F1 seeks to rediscover its glory days – something it has made positive progress in via its changes for 2017 – a revision or tweak is surely on the cards for 2020.

Quite what form it will take? There lies one of the big battlegrounds for F1’s leaders to compete on in the coming years.

Marco Andretti to drive throwback scheme to honor 25th anniversary of grandfather Mario’s last win

Photo courtesy Andretti-Herta Autosport
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Marco Andretti wanted to do something really special to honor the 25th anniversary of grandfather Mario Andretti’s final Indy car win in 1993 at Phoenix International Raceway (now known as ISM Raceway).

So the third-generation Andretti, along with his team, Andretti-Herta Autosport, came up with a plan and design that will take longtime race fans back in time when it appears early next month for the Phoenix Grand Prix.

Marco Andretti’s No. 98 Oberto Beef Jerky Circle K/Curb Honda will be decked out in the colors of the car his grandfather won his last race on the one-mile short track 25 years ago.

“When the idea of a throwback livery celebrating my grandfather’s final win was thrown around, Oberto was ready to get to the drawing board,” Marco Andretti said in a media release. “The black, white and red car resembles many of my family’s race cars and was a big part of my life growing up.

“It’s really cool to be able to add one of my cars to that family legacy.”

The car is a virtual double of the legendary Newman-Haas Racing and Texaco/Havoline-sponsored car Mario drove on that celebratory day in the Valley of the Sun 2 ½ decades ago.

Various events and ceremonies during the April 6-7 race weekend will honor the senior Andretti. That includes several of his former competitors who will be on hand to celebrate with Mario, including Emerson Fittipaldi, Bobby Rahal, Jimmy Vasser, Paul Tracy, Arie Luyendyk, and of course, son Michael Andretti and grandson Marco Andretti.

Check out what happened on that day 25 years ago:

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