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With study upcoming, Long Beach F1 vs. Indy political football is back

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A little more than a week after the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach has been completed, the long-term planning of the event and the political football about whether it should remain a bastion of the Verizon IndyCar Series calendar or be open to a Formula 1 switch is once again back in play.

Per a report from the Long Beach Gazettes, the Long Beach City Council approved a contract for a consultant to study whether IndyCar should stay – as it has since 1984 – or whether its predecessor, Formula 1, could come back. F1 ran at Long Beach from 1976 through 1983.

The council signed a contract worth $150,000 with KPMG Corporate Finance, LLC for the work, and while the contract is for a year, it can be terminated by either side with 30 days’ notice.

This is, of course, not the first time this political football has been tossed around regarding the two open-wheel series, one of which is worldwide and the other is this country’s top form of open-wheel racing.

There’s been previous looks, most recently in 2014, about the viability of F1 returning to Long Beach. But that year saw Long Beach extend the deal with INDYCAR for three years through to 2018, the end of the current contract.

Of course a ton has changed in F1 from a leadership standpoint over that time period. New owners Liberty Media are keen to expand F1’s presence in North America and have talked openly about the possibility of a Los Angeles race, and given Long Beach is established and has the F1 history there, it seems to make sense.

Except that it doesn’t. The cost of bringing F1 back would likely be an astronomical leap for the city, which would need to build proper pit garages, lengthen the track beyond its current 1.968-mile layout and would perhaps need to add further accommodations. A concern that comes along would be that higher ticket prices would likely have an adverse effect on attendance over the three days.

Race chief Jim Michaelian, who has steered this race to its continued success over the years, told the Sports Business Journal’s Adam Stern beyond 2018 it’d very much need to be an either-or situation as there’s no room for both, and that makes sense.

Michaelian told reporters in the Long Beach deadline room he expected the crowd close if not above the 2016 total of 182,420 and a Long Beach Press-Telegram editorial board column on this year’s race confirmed just that, more than 183,000 patrons over the weekend.

The Press-Telegram column also noted this:

“There was something for everyone this year — race car aficionados, music fans, families — in picture-perfect weather.

“The city never looked better than it did on live national television for a record 7 1/2 hours. It was a great way to show off the city’s waterfront, downtown and skyline.

“It’s difficult to put an exact pricetag on what that kind of TV exposure is worth to a city, but it’s a marketeer’s dream.”

Naturally, the editorial ignores that worldwide international TV exposure from an F1 race could well be bigger, but that’s beside the point. For just what was on the 2017 docket, the editorial is spot-on.

Beyond the marquee Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach for IndyCar which was on NBCSN, IMSA also had a national showcase with its BUBBA burger Sports Car Grand Prix airing live on FOX network, and Pirelli World Challenge got a same-day TV race as well on the CBS Sports Network.

A change from IndyCar to F1 wouldn’t just affect the headliner but it also affects the other series that participate on the weekend.

More to the point, it’d affect the fans. With a heavy amount of locals that comprise the 183,000 – some of whom who may not have the same resources to go to an F1 race if it switched – it’d be hard to see attendance in that same ballpark at least at the outset.

Some in the F1 media world think the prospect of Long Beach being back in their court is real, and they may have the connections to think that prospect is legitimate.

It is imperative, though, for INDYCAR to strike a deal to keep Long Beach a part of its calendar. Long Beach remains the gold standard for street course races in this country and for IndyCar, a critical tentpole in its schedule that puts it second to the Indianapolis 500 in terms of importance, history, length, attendance and cache.

This year’s winner James Hinchcliffe was effusive in his Long Beach praise as he drove into victory lane. He knows how much this race means and understood the magnitude of it – the value of Long Beach to him seemed as great if not greater than the overall story line of his comeback from his near-fatal injuries sustained in an accident in practice before the 2015 Indianapolis 500.

If INDYCAR was to lose Long Beach, it’d be a bitter pill to swallow. There’s no immediate event that then steps up to be the lead road or street race on the calendar, because the remaining ones all have their strong selling points, but none is head-and-shoulders above the rest. St. Petersburg or Barber would probably be the leading candidates because of their established date equity at the start of the year while Road America and Watkins Glen are iconic road circuits, but both now only in their second year back on the calendar.

The Press-Telegram editorial closed: “The Grand Prix Association’s contract with the city expires at the end of 2018, but it’s difficult to see how this partnership will not be renewed.

“For 43 years, the Grand Prix Association has provided the city with an outstanding event that continues to grow and showcases the city across the nation.

“It has become the city’s signature event and is no longer just a street car race. It has become an entertainment festival that has taken years to build with people who care about Long Beach.”

So watch this space to see not whether the Grand Prix continues – that seems a near lock – but whether INDYCAR and Long Beach can nail down a critical extension beyond 2018.

GoDaddy to sponsor Patrick in ‘Danica Double’ at Daytona, Indy — now all she needs are rides

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By The Associated Press

Danica Patrick is going back to green.

GoDaddy Green, to be exact – a fitting color for her farewell tour.

The company will sponsor Patrick in the upcoming “Danica Double” that will close out her racing career, The Associated Press has learned. Patrick has no ride yet for next month’s Daytona 500 or the Indianapolis 500 in May, but she now has the financial backing to pull it off.

This time around, the original GoDaddy Girl will symbolize the new core mission of the company that helped make her one of the world’s most recognizable athletes.

“There’s this great story: I left IndyCar with GoDaddy on my car, I started NASCAR with GoDaddy on my car, I’m most recognized as the GoDaddy green car and driver, and so to finish up my career that way feels appropriate,” Patrick told the AP from Scottsdale, Arizona.

Her final race will be the Indy 500, an appropriate choice because it was “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” that rocketed Patrick and GoDaddy into pop culture notoriety.

GoDaddy and Patrick grew up together. The company switched series with her and marketed her as a strong, sexy woman in 13 Super Bowl commercials – a record appearance for celebrities. Now, the company is most interested in Patrick the budding businesswoman who is firmly closing the door on her racing career and rebranding herself as an entrepreneur . She has a book out, an apparel line, a wine label and confirmed to AP this week that she’s dating Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

“Our goals are so well-aligned,” Barb Rechterman, the chief marketing officer of GoDaddy, told AP. “She’s passionate, tenacious and creative just like so many of our customers who are also looking to leverage the power of the internet and turn their `side hustle’ into a full-time business. Danica absolutely epitomizes the heart of our GoDaddy customers.”

Prepare to hear a lot about the “side hustle” as GoDaddy climbs aboard the so-far fledgling “Danica Double.”

Patrick announced in November she would end her driving career with the Daytona 500 and Indy 500, but didn’t have a deal completed for either race. Still doesn’t. Yet somehow, Patrick always figures a way to get what she wants. Talks ended with Chip Ganassi Racing about a possible ride, and late last month, Patrick said, she called former GoDaddy founder Bob Parsons and asked about a reunion.

GoDaddy has rebranded since it last teamed with Patrick. The company now touts itself as “the world’s largest cloud platform dedicated to small, independent ventures,” and there’s no better spokeswoman than Patrick, who is in the next chapter of her life and her brand.

GoDaddy pulled out of racing after the 2015 season, and Patrick hasn’t had the same level of funding and marketing support since. Patrick has slowly reshaped her image, first into a Instagram model and is now a full-blown lifestyle guru. She realized – at the age of 35 – she was on her own.

She and GoDaddy aligned for a splashy move into NASCAR, where she was glamorous off the track but only mediocre on it. Through all of this, she was married, divorced, spent five years dating fellow driver and competitor Ricky Stenhouse Jr., and then seemed to find herself through a tailored diet, exercise and a healthy lifestyle.

She is cutting the cord on racing after Indy, and her focus is on a sense of well-being far away from the track.

“Their business is so perfectly paired to what is going on with mine, so when we sat down and met, it was like, `Let’s talk about our business. Let’s talk about the messaging. How does this work?”‘ Patrick said. “And this is undeniably perfect for both of us. Not only is it a huge two races and the biggest two races of the year, but on top of that, you have so much `side hustle’ going on, and all the messaging and our brands, and where we are going is so perfectly paired.”w

GoDaddy can help Patrick move on to whatever it is for racing’s former “It Girl.” The company will help her streamline her online presence. Patrick, for the company, is back as a neon green-and-yellow symbol to all the wannabe entrepreneurs chasing dreams.

She’ll get those rides, too. Patrick said she knows she will because she believes she will.

“That’s just the way the universe works,” she said. “You have to ask for what you want. Things have taken a long time with this, but you just have to go with the flow on these things. The universe is not on your time schedule.”

More AP auto racing: https://racing.ap.org/