Welk (far left) is working on several elements of business of racing. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

Q&A: A look at balancing apparel, driver coaching work in racing

Leave a comment

If you don’t make it in racing as a driver, there are plenty of other ways to stay involved with the sport. Many drivers who went from karting up the open-wheel ladder but made it short of IndyCar work in coaching and others have business ventures that see them in several layers of the sport.

The “layer” pun here is intentional to introduce Steve Welk, who was a star karter and a promising young driver out of Wisconsin. After moving out of driving, Welk’s carved a successful career in apparel with Styled Aesthetic (outfits and apparel in both the open-wheel and sports car worlds) and as a driver coach (Linear Sport) and spotter, working most notably with fellow Wisconsinite Aaron Telitz.

Telitz won last year’s Pro Mazda Championship Presented by Cooper Tires title with Team Pelfrey, and the two have moved up the ladder into Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires this year thanks to support from Mazda. Welk also spots annually for Pippa Mann at the Indianapolis 500. This year, Telitz finished second in the Freedom 100, and Mann had her best result in six ‘500s of 17th in the 33-car field, moving forward from 28th in the No. 63 Susan G. Komen Honda for Dale Coyne Racing.

We caught up with Welk – also jokingly known as “Swelk” when the Steve and Welk are combined – for a look into his life in the racing world. Similar behind-the-scenes business of racing stories we’ve chronicled in 2017 are linked here (JJRD on coaching, Speed Group on racing business development).

MotorSportsTalk: Explain the idea and build process behind doing an apparel company. Since you have a racing background, how important is it to ‘look the part’ from a branding and style standpoint?

Steve Welk: “The creation of Styled Aesthetic was about a year long process between myself and my best friend and now business partner Kyle Werra. Kyle had been screen printing in his basement for pub crawls and family events for about 3 years when we started talking about making that into a proper business. This was in 2008 and I had started to see the writing on the wall that my racing career was not going to go the way I had hoped. In August that year I decided to quit driving and that is when our planning really started accelerating. In November of 2008 we started working with our first race team and we officially incorporated in January of 2009 as Styled Aesthetic.

ArmsUp Motorsports’ Devin Wojcik at Barber Motorsports Park in USF2000. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

“My racing background plays a huge roll in how we approached our company. While I was still active as a driver I had managed a kart team and later worked with ArmsUp Motorsports (one of our first clients, see right with driver Devin Wojcik) as their marketing person. Those two roles allowed me to spend a lot of time working on the branding of race teams and trying to make sure they had a proper look and how hard it was to maintain that look.

“With motorsports being a very visual sport, having a coherent brand is massive. As we were planning the company we knew Kyle’s immense art talent and my branding experience would allow us to come up with really good programs for the race teams and other clients we would eventually work with.”

MST: How do you grow a small company through sales/marketing? Is it primarily word of mouth or how do you get the word out a bit more?

SW: “Our sales and marketing approach has always been based on word of mouth and personal sales, especially in the motorsports community. When we first started the company, I sent a blanket email to pretty much every motorsports contact I had in my email list and we rolled from there. The customers that we have developed in motorsports have almost all been from relationships built with people at the track. There are times when I have specific goals in mind of teams to talk to, and other customers have come out of just random conversations I have with people at the track, or now other people recommending us.

Photo: Team USA Scholarship

“We have done some very targeted sponsorships as well to help expand our client base. One of my favorite programs is our position as the official apparel provider for the Team USA Scholarship (see last year’s one of two winners, Oliver Askew, right). It’s a great program to support, as well as helps us make contacts with a lot of the other great companies that support the program. For us, it’s all about being at the track and being involved.

“I also learned pretty early on, that if you provide what the client asks for, when they ask for it, you are going to be welcomed back. Knowing the industry like we do, we know when our teams race, where they race, when the test days are and so forth. When we are discussing orders they appreciate we are speaking their language which allows us to follow through on tight deadlines, for the right series at the right events. Through my race coaching and spotting, I am at the racetrack a lot and I am able to talk with our clients on a regular basis so I am able to keep track of what they are doing and what they may need next.

“So short answer is word of mouth, but it ends up being a lot of communication and paying attention to what our teams our doing so we can be ready when they need apparel.”

MST: What’s your rough number of clients for apparel and your rough number of clients you’ll coach for?

SW: “Throughout the motorsports industry we probably have 25-35 teams and motorsports related companies that we work with.

Wright Motorsports Porsche 991 GT3 Cup cars in IMSA. Photo courtesy of IMSA

“Our clients span most of the IMSA paddock from the Porsche GT3 Cup (see Wright Motorsports, right) to the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship. Over the last two years we have expanded to running at-track retail sale programs for four IMSA teams (Tequila Patron ESM, Michael Shank Racing, Stevenson Motorsports and JDC-Miller Motorsports).

“The retail program is managed by my sister Heidi. She joined Styled to run that program, so it’s been a lot of fun traveling to races with her again like we did when we were kids going to my kart races.

“In open-wheel we cover the entire Mazda Road to Indy where we supply teams in all three levels. ArmsUp motorsports has been with us since day one, Gregg Borland is a good friend and was a big supporter of idea when Kyle and I first began planning the company, along with Team Pelfrey, Pabst Racing, Exclusive Autosport amongst others.

Harvey and Shank are rolling through the ups and downs of Indy. Photo: IndyCar

“We had our first IndyCar presence with a team in the Indy 500 this year. Our sports car relationship with Mike Shank allowed us to produce some of his MSR-500 crew apparel. As open wheel has always been my passion, having an Indy 500 team wearing apparel we produced is a pretty cool thing.

“On the coaching side, I currently have about 5-6 clients that I work with throughout the year. I like to keep the number of clients concise to keep me from losing my mind a bit.

“My lead client is Aaron Telitz in the Indy Lights series. Aaron and I started working together at his first car race ever in Skip Barber over 5 years ago. As he has climbed the MRTI or relationship as evolved, so I now act as his manager as well as coach.

Pippa Mann. Photo: IndyCar

“This year I began working with Team Pelfrey as their Pro Mazda team coach. I was involved with them last year when Aaron won the Pro Mazda Championship and when they moved some people around in their organization and the spot opened up I jumped at the chance to continue to work with the great group of people they have.

“On the sports-car side I work with Wright Motorsports’ GT3-Cup team as a consultant on their 5-car program and with the Stevenson Motorsports team as their spotter for the NAEC and any other rounds I can attend.

“And last but not least I came back to the Indy 500 spotting for Pippa Mann for the fourth straight year (right), which I am always excited about.”

MST: How do you balance working in so many different series? What are the positives from a business standpoint of open-wheel and sports car worlds?

Telitz flashes the peace sign. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

SW: “Running back and forth between all the series is mostly about managing expectations and time. On MRTI weekends when Lights and Pro Mazda are running together, it’s all about keeping track of time and prioritizing schedules and which fires need the most attention. On those weekends, it’s pretty manic keeping up with it all, but I really like the challenge of working on multiple programs and still doing quality work.

“The teams I work with know that I have different schedules and as long as we are on the same page that way it works out really well.

“Keeping my schedule straight at Styled is probably the most challenging thing. I am on the road for a solid 20-25 weekends, so Kyle takes on a lot of work at the shop to keep up with the demand. As we have grown as a company, that has been our biggest challenge is keeping up with the work load. It seems to be our constant battle, but we have continued to make improvements and we always look how to be better as a company.

“Being involved in both the open wheel and sports car worlds just provide more potential for clients. For Styled, if we keep producing solid work that the teams like, it just allows us to grow our brand through the two different worlds.”

MST: After your driving career ended, what piqued your interest in then coaching and apparel afterwards?

SW: “Like most race drivers, I started working as a coach at Skip Barber to pay some bills while I wasn’t getting paid to drive race cars. That experience at Skip lead to coaching gigs in karting then back to cars. I look back at it now, had I not tried to coach so much maybe I would have been more cut throat in making it as a driver. At the end of the day I really enjoyed coaching and showed some proficiency at it. When I decided to quit driving and change my focus to coaching it was a seamless transition for me as I had that plan in mind for a few years.

“My interest in apparel grew out of my love of the visuals of racing. Since I was a kid, I always loved looking at the new liveries on the cars when they were released so now working on helping teams finish their branding is pretty rewarding for me.

“The other reason I went this route was my understanding of how fickle working in the racing industry can be. It is a tough sport to make a living at, and having some varied source of income is key to surviving in it. The final reason I wanted to go into this business was the opportunity to have a business partner who was my best friend involved. The joke about Kyle and I is that our skills combined almost make one person and without his artistic ability and our shared drive to make this a success, there is no Styled Aesthetic.”

MST: What have been some of your best business successes so far via Styled Aesthetic and Linear Sport?

Styled Aesthetic logo on Aaron Telitz’s Indy LIghts car. Photo: Tony DiZinno

SW: “The short answer to that is the same in both businesses, we have earned the respect of the industry for what we do. As a driver I was never able to realize my full potential for many reasons, but these two businesses have given me that second chance to earn the respect I wasn’t able to as a driver.

“Styled for me is just the number of teams we now work with and how we continue to grow as a company. We have now been in business for seven years and every year we have grown in sales and people. Kyle and I started this company in a 200 square foot area in his basement printing 1 shirt at a time. We now have a 2800 square foot shop with seven employees. It’s all still a bit surreal to me.

“On the coaching side, my greatest success has been working with Aaron Telitz on his run up the motorsports ladder. He and I share a similar vision about life and motorsports and have grown into really good friends over our time working together.

“Winning the Pro Mazda Championship was obviously the tip of the iceberg, so far, especially in the way he won. After the oval race where he finished sixth I think and we were way down to Pato (O’Ward) in the standings, that season could have melted down. But Aaron, the team and myself all really jelled and worked forward. It was one of those seasons that don’t come around too often, so you really have to cherish them when they do.”

Telitz won last year’s Pro Mazda title. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

Another day, another photo finish in MX-5 Cup at Road America

Photo: Global MX-5 Cup
Leave a comment

ELKHART LAKE, Wis. – The first of three sports car races held Saturday at Road America featured a familiar ending in the Battery Tender Global MX-5 Cup presented by BFGoodrich Tires: a photo finish.

For the third time in four races, a margin of victory of less than a tenth of a second was all that decided the race. This time it was defending series champion Nathanial Sparks of Sick Sideways Racing, edging Atlanta Speedwerks’ Todd Lamb by 0.0468 of a second, for the victory.

Sparks’ win slots in second in the three photo finishes. Friday’s race one saw Patrick Gallagher beat Bryan Ortiz by 0.0263 of a second. At Indianapolis last weekend, Robert Stout beat Gallagher by 0.0632 of a second.

Sparks, also known as “Sparky,” explained how he made the move for the win.

“I fell back a little and I put my head down and really drove hard and I found myself back up at the front,” said Sparks. “Ortiz, Gallagher, and all those guys were driving so hard and there was battling for position and jockeying and moving around. I had a good run coming up out of the last corner and I managed to make my Mazda motor just power me up and just drove it home. It was super excited bringing it home for my Sick Sideways team today.”

Lamb, who came up short, offered his take: “That was a lot of fun. It’s my first podium of the season. We’re starting to get these cars figured out and starting to figure out who is going to work with us and who’s not. It’s been a lot of fun and a good learning experience this weekend, I’m looking forward to more!”

Gallagher led the standings by 39 points over Sparks heading into the weekend and extended the lead with his win on Friday.

“It was definitely more chaotic today, nobody wanted to work together like they did yesterday,” said Gallagher. “Everyone thought they had to be in second, but they didn’t realize they needed to be there until the last lap. Everybody was trying to get to second place from lap one, people were leaning on me and I just had to be careful. I got shoved around a little bit, but it’s a long season, and the championship points we got here this weekend are most important.”

The McCumbee McAleer Racing driver finished third today, his season worst result (hardly a bad thing for the Thornville, Ohio native) and still leads the points as the series heads next to the streets of Toronto, July 14-16, for Rounds 7 and 8. That is also part of a Verizon IndyCar Series weekend.

Fong (Bentley), James (Panoz) score Saturday PWC Road America wins

Photos: PWC
Leave a comment

ELKHART LAKE, Wis. – Pirelli World Challenge has returned to full Sprint race action at Road America today with its GT class, while the GTS class was joined by a handful of invitational entries in the TC class for a pair of races at the 4.014-mile circuit.

GT

Adderly Fong, the Hong Kong-based driver, has captured his first career PWC victory in the No. 88 Bentley Team Absolute Bentley Continental GT3.

It’s Bentley’s first PWC victory since 2015, when Chris Dyson won here at the same circuit. The win came after Fong scored the pole, his second straight and Bentley’s third straight at the track. It also comes on the same day as Bentley won the Paul Ricard 1000km in the Blancpain Endurance Series, with Fong’s SprintX co-driver Vincent Abril co-driving for Bentley Team M-Sport with Andy Soucek and Maxime Soulet (below).

Fong had a pair of podiums here last year and with the Bentley expected to do well at this circuit, the pressure was on to deliver.

“My team manager told me if I didn’t win, I didn’t get to have dinner,” Fong joked in the post-race press conference. “I guess I can eat tonight!”

The race-winning performance in the 50-minute race was delivered after Fong collided with Johnny O’Connell on the opening lap, Fong on the inside pitching O’Connell on the outside into a spin exiting Turn 5. Fong apologized for the contact, but was not penalized by PWC race officials.

From there, Fong controlled the pace over Patrick Long, in the No. 58 Wright Motorsports Porsche 911 GT3 R, with both drivers managing their Pirelli tires from there.

Long got close, but never close enough to make a passing attempt of Fong for the win. Nonetheless, after finishes of third, first and second in the first three races, Long’s fourth straight Sprint podium brought him forth the Sprint points lead.

Michael Cooper completed the podium in the No. 8 Cadillac Racing Cadillac ATS-V.R, continuing his consistent season in pursuit of an overall PWC championship combining both the Sprint and SprintX components of the calendar. Cooper and Jordan Taylor won the lone SprintX race at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park this year while Cooper posted his first Sprint podium of the season.

Daniel Mancinelli had a rare but welcome trouble-free race in his No. 31 TR3 Racing Ferrari 488 GT3 to finish fourth, with the first of the RealTime Racing Acura NSX GT3s, Peter Kox’s No. 93 car, scoring a top-five finish on RealTime’s home soil near its Saukville, Wis. base.

O’Connell rebounded to eighth overall after his first lap spin in his No. 3 Cadillac.

In 13th, James Sofronas won the GTA class in his No. 14 GMG Racing Porsche 911 GT3 R. Yuki Harata won the GT Cup class in a Dream Racing Lamborghini Huracán LP 620-2.

GTS

Elkhart Lake, WI – Jun 23, 2017: The Pirelli World Challenge racers take to the track on Pirelli tires during the Pirelli World Challenge Grand Prix at Road America presented by VP Racing Fuels at the Road America in Elkhart Lake, WI.

Ian James has scored the Panoz Avezzano GT’s maiden victory, as the new car took the win in Saturday’s combined GTS and TC race.

It comes after a series of close calls, a near win at Lime Rock Park before engine failure and its first podium there as well. The Tom Milner-led team has a series of holdovers who have worked on Don Panoz’s most recent creation, the DeltaWing, and have transitioned over to a more normal looking sports car.

James dominated the 50-minute race while the battle was more behind him for second place, featuring Jeff Courtney’s No. 99 JCR Motorsports Maserati GT4 in his home race and Lawson Aschenbach in the No. 10 Blackdog Speed Shop Chevrolet Camaro GT4.R.

Aschenbach, the championship leader, drove smart to get another podium finish with Courtney just behind despite several attempts.

They held off a late charge from Austin Versteeg, PWC debutante, in the No. 13 ANSA Motorsports KTM X-BOW GT4. The talented teenager out of Sandy, Utah has shifted to racing Lamborghinis this year after racing prototypes but was now in Alain Nadal’s entry this weekend.

Cody Ellsworth, in his No. 111 RacerInk Porsche Cayman, won the TC class.

MRTI: Franzoni, Martin Pro Mazda title tilt heats up at Road America

Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
Leave a comment

ELKHART LAKE, Wis. – For the first time in the 2017 Mazda Road to Indy presented by Cooper Tires season, the gloves are officially off between two title combatants, after an intense, high-pressure weekend split in Pro Mazda Championship Presented by Cooper Tires.

For Victor Franzoni, a win and a second place served as a disappointing weekend for Juncos Racing, because even despite starting last in Saturday’s race two, he very nearly could have won.

Quite by contrast, second and first for Cape Motorsports’ Anthony Martin was even better than he might have hoped for, with a clear pace deficit to Franzoni this weekend but able to doggedly hold him off in race two.

Franzoni dominated Friday’s race one, which was pretty straightforward. Still though, after red flags caught Franzoni out before qualifying race two, he wasn’t as happy as he usually is.

“The quali was unlucky. We tried a strategy and it didn’t work!” Franzoni told NBC Sports. “But the whole team and I were like, ‘Let’s forget the quali. Let’s focus on what we can do today after quali one.’

“Juncos Racing gave me the great car. It was a big fight. After I got by Anthony, I could go away. It was good. Everything was fine. This was my first win in Road America. Tomorrow is gonna be fun, but I’m really confident. I think we can fight for the win tomorrow.”

Martin put up a valiant fight early in the race but was unable to hold onto it.

“I thought if I’d do anything it’d be the first few laps. as I gave that a red hot shot,” Martin told NBC Sports. “We battled quite hard. I knew he had a better and quicker car than me. I consolidated that I would be in second, looked after my tires. It’ll hurt your tires. I jumped into second and looked after the tires.”

Saturday’s race two, meanwhile, was a barnburner. The second 30-minute race of the weekend saw three yellow flags but Franzoni on a charge from 15th up to second.

Franzoni made it to third by Lap 4 of the eventual 11-lap race. But while the first yellow aided his charge and brought him just two car lengths away from Martin on the first restart, the next two yellows interrupted that process because he’d need to catch up Martin and attempt to pass him again.

“All the unlucky came together,” Franzoni said Saturday. “The race being 40 versus 30. Starting last. Three yellow flags! Everything came down to this not being my race.”

The Brazilian said he still could have hunted down Martin from last on the grid even without the aid of a yellow flag.

“I think with green the whole race, it was possible to do. The car was really really fast. When the first yellow came it was OK, and I thought, ‘Now it’s easier,’ but not the other ones!”

But it was after the restarts that Franzoni thought Martin drove over-aggressively, making his car wider to keep the faster Franzoni behind him.

At Turn 5 in particular, the two drivers had one moment where they both went in deep, overshot the corner entry, and Martin and Franzoni both ran wide on exit. There was another moment exiting Turn 5 where Franzoni got a run up the hill to the inside while Martin moved across to defend there.

The two drivers explained their respective vantage points.

Martin (8) and Franzoni (23) had an intense battle today. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

“I was almost four wheels in the grass. He didn’t give me space,” Franzoni alleged. “There were two times in Turn 5, and I tried outside. He threw the car on me. It was not so nice.”

Martin said, “Knowing that Race Control and everyone is watching, you don’t want to get caught out and make a mistake. So I tried to make it difficult for him to get past me. We both went extremely deep into Turn 5, and we both overshot it.

“We’ve raced each other a few years (in the Mazda Road to Indy). We’re not gonna do anything stupid to each other. I tried to keep him behind me. Things happen. But nothing happened that catastrophic. It was a tough race for both of us. It worked out well for both of us.”

Martin, who led the entirety of the second race, had to exert some key mental training to stay focused for the restarts. With caution laps being so long at the 4.014-mile circuit, Martin knew he had to keep his head in the game.

“It felt long. All the safety car laps take so long! I looked at the dash and thought, ‘It’s a 5-minute lap, we at Spa or something?’ It was pretty crazy the whole race. Mentally very difficult, but we were able to keep him behind.”

Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course comes next the end of July for Pro Mazda after another month break in this season’s condensed schedule.

And it’ll be an important weekend. With three races and Franzoni only seven points clear of Martin, 174-167, it will be imperative to maximize the mark.

Martin enters high on confidence having completed a triple-race sweep in USF2000 with Cape there last year, and with Cape having also delivered a weekend double in Pro Mazda with Nico Jamin driving.

“We know we have a great car at Mid-Ohio but Juncos does as well,” Martin said. “He’s had a half a championship of experience in Pro Mazda – this half – but the team are pushing me to my limit. They’ll implement the correct driving style.

“Mid-Ohio really suits me. I love that track. It suits my style a lot more than these last two tracks.”

Juncos, though, always fields a strong car at Mid-Ohio too and Franzoni will be hoping his car will be just as strong there.

“I had such good equipment. I could have won this race,” Franzoni said. “It’s OK. We’re still leading the championship. I’m disappointed because we had a really big gap and really good car.

“I thought we could use this weekend better to get all the points. It wasn’t so difficult. We’re in good shape but I’m sad because we didn’t win.”

MRTI Road America Notebook: Saturday

Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
Leave a comment

Saturday was a busy day for the all three series in the Mazda Road to Indy Presented by Cooper Tires, with each contesting races in the early afternoon. The day saw three dominating victories, along with an epic drive from one of the championship leaders.

 

Indy Lights: Leist Dominates Race 1

The momentum Matheus Leist had built in the month of May carried over into the month of June, as he led every lap from pole to dominate Race 1 at Road America for the Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires. He fended off challenges from Neil Alberico and Ryan Norman in turn 1 after the start and slowly began to pull away from the field, eventually winning by over six seconds.

“The car today was perfect,” said an elated Leist, who will start second in Race 2. “The moment was very good. I’m very happy for this team working so hard. The car is fast in qualifying and fast in the race as well. Really looking for tomorrow.”

Santi Urrutia emerged in second after a tough fight with Ryan Norman and Kyle Kaiser in the early laps, with Kaiser rounding out the podium in third, ahead of Norman in fourth.

Urrutia, despite the strong finish, was very frustrated afterward, citing a simple lack of pace that kept him from challenging for the win. “I’m struggling as I don’t have the speed,” he lamented. “That’s the only thing. Long day to improve the car. Definitely we’re not quick. We want to keep gaining some speed and developing for the championship.”

Kaiser, meanwhile, continued the consistency that has vaulted him into the championship lead. But, as he explained afterward, Kaiser is not playing prevent. “I think it’s important to finish races but I’m not trying to be careful,” he asserted. “When you’re too defensive and careful you get wrecked. I showed that this weekend. We made a lot of good passes. I was aggressive to the very last lap. That’s the plan the rest of the year.”

Of note: Neil Alberico was shuffled nearly outside the top ten after running wide at Turn 1 on the opening lap, but eventually rebounded to finish seventh. Colton Herta and Aaron Telitz, meanwhile, endured very difficult races that saw neither in contention at any time, and both finished outside of the top ten. Telitz was 11th and Herta 12th at the checkered flag, with Herta even spinning late in the going.

Results are below. Race 2 rolls off Sunday at 9:45 a.m. (8:45 local time) and will air on NBCSN at 11:30 a.m. ET. Qualifying report for Race 2 can be found here.

 

Pro Mazda: Martin Withstands Franzoni Charge for Race 2 Win

Anthony Martin needed to fend off a hungry Victory Franzoni for the Race 2 win in Pro Mazda. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

Victory Franzoni may have had the drive of the year in Race 2 for the Pro Mazda Championship Presented by Cooper Tires, but it was Anthony Martin who went to victory lane. Martin led every lap from the pole, while Franzoni ripped through the field after starting 15th to finish second.

Franzoni was up to third in the early laps when a caution for a spinning Brendan Puderbach allowed him to close the gap to Martin. He then moved to second on the subsequent restart and immediately began pressuring Martin for the lead.

Martin had to endure two more restarts, one coming on the final lap, to hold off the fast-moving Franzoni, but he was able to consistently thwart all challenges to take his third win of the 2017 season. Nikita Lastochkin rounded out the podium in third.

Martin explained afterward that he kept Franzoni behind him by focusing forward. “I got a really good start and I kept that gap for a good while until the safety car came out and bunched everyone up. And at that point, I saw the standard white and purple car in third place and thought ‘OK, he’s definitely got pace.’ I just had to put my head down and my bum up and really focus on the road ahead of me and not behind me,” said the Australian.

Franzoni, despite the strong run, lamented losing points to Martin in the championship. “I’m sad not to win, but other people would say it’s good that I came back to finish second. But we lost points today, even though I came from last to second. I had to be really smart and really aggressive. I couldn’t lose time but I couldn’t crash,” he said.

Results are below. Franzoni now leads Martin by a scant seven points, with Pro Mazda’s next event coming at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course on July 28-29.

 

USF2000: Rinus Veekay Sweeps the Weekend

Rinus Veekay won both USF2000 races at Road America. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

Rinus VeeKay (full surname of Van Kalmthout) had the broom out in the Cooper Tires USF2000 Championship Powered by Mazda as he swept the weekend at Road America. The 16-year-old Dutchman outlasted challenges from David Malukas, Calvin Ming, and Oliver Askew to dominate Race 2. It is also the third consecutive race weekend in which a driver won both races, with Oliver Askew doing so at the previous rounds at Barber Motorsports Park and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Road Course.

“It’s great. I won a lot of points for the championship standings, and I’m happy with that. I’m happy I could show the speed. My first two wins in one weekend, it’s great!” said a jubilant Veekay.

Ming managed to get ahead of Askew for second, while Askew rebounded from Friday’s  17th-place finish to end up third. They moved up at the expense of Malukas, who had been running second, but spun off into the gravel at turn 14 on the final lap.

Results are below (note: Ming finished second, with Malukas credited with 12th). Veekay’s victories, coupled with Askew’s struggles, bring Veekay to within 23 points of the championship lead. The next race for USF2000 is July 9 at Iowa Speedway, the only oval on their 2017 calendar.

Follow Kyle Lavigne.