Hamilton dominates in Mercedes 1-2 at Canadian Grand Prix

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A peerless drive from pole has witnessed Lewis Hamilton capture his third win of the season, 56th of his Formula 1 career, and sixth in the Canadian Grand Prix, leading Mercedes AMG Petronas’ first 1-2 finish of the season.

Valtteri Bottas followed him home a little ways behind, while it was the battle for third that dominated the story most of the race.

Daniel Ricciardo held on for the final podium spot in his Red Bull, ahead of Sebastian Vettel for Scuderia Ferrari, the pair of Sahara Force India Mercedes cars driven by Sergio Perez and Esteban Ocon, and Kimi Raikkonen in the second Ferrari, all on differing tire strategies and with Vettel needing to make up the gap after wing damage sustained on the first lap.

Force India made strategic misstep at the worst possible time in not having Perez allow Ocon by, which may well have cost them a podium.

Meanwhile, Lance Stroll and Fernando Alonso were both set to score their first points of the season in the minor placings, Stroll doing so on home soil for Williams with Alonso finally looking set to drag the McLaren Honda to one point. But even that went away as he stopped on track with just two laps to go.

It was a chaotic start with Hamilton getting away well from the pole while Vettel was swamped by Red Bull’s Max Verstappen, who got up to second and clipped Vettel’s right front wing end plate in the process.

Behind them, there was more drama as Romain Grosjean’s Haas and Carlos Sainz Jr.’s Toro Rosso got tangled together exiting Turn 2. Sainz’s miserable weekend came to an end on the first lap as his car careened across the road and collected Felipe Massa’s Williams in the process.

That brought out the first Safety Car of the race, and allowed Grosjean (who switched from Pirelli’s ultrasoft compound to a set of supersofts) and Sauber’s Pascal Wehrlein (who did the opposite and went from supersoft to ultrasoft) to go off sequence.

Vettel pitted after the restart on Lap 5 for a front wing replacement and his own tire change to supersofts, and dropped to 18th and last on the road.

Verstappen’s blinder of a start went away quickly at Turn 2 on Lap 11, when after an upshift his TAG Heuer-badged Renault engine engaged a box full of neutrals. He ground to a halt from second place with an with an apparent battery issue, and that brought out a Virtual Safety Car.

Renault’s Nico Hulkenberg and Jolyon Palmer, and Sauber’s Marcus Ericsson were good to pit on this sequence.

With Verstappen out, Hamilton managed to increase his lead to more than six seconds shortly after the restart, ahead of Bottas, Ricciardo, Perez, and Raikkonen.

Pit stops followed from there with most drivers switching onto the supersoft compound, but Ricciardo went onto the softs instead.

Vettel had made it back to eighth after his first lap wing issue and subsequent pit stop in that period.

Hamilton and Ocon ran 1-2 at the time, but needed to pit. Both did so and went from ultrasofts onto supersofts.

At half distance, Hamilton led Bottas, but an intriguing battle was shaping up for the final podium spot. Ricciardo was third on the softs ahead of Perez, Raikkonen, and Ocon, with Vettel in fourth. Ocon, having pitted latest of that group, was on the freshest tires, but would need to pass all on track in order to move up the order.

Ferrari, meanwhile, reported in on Lap 37 that Vettel had a damaged floor, and would have to press on with that.

Raikkonen dispatched his supersofts for ultrasofts in the final 28 laps, which was an interesting strategic play. That meant it’d be a straight fight between the Force India teammates, Perez and Ocon, for fourth unless Raikkonen could claw back enough of a gap to overcome the deficit created by the pit stop.

A little further down the order, Lance Stroll made a series of moves to advance up to 13th, and gained another position when Alonso pitted after 43 laps on ultrasofts to go to supersofts.

He then pressed the pair of McLaren teammates, with Alonso and Stoffel Vandoorne ahead of him, and would later get ahead of both of them by the end of Lap 47 to get into 11th. With Magnussen in the pits, that promoted him up to 10th and a point. He gained another spot when Daniil Kvyat pitted from ninth and suffered tires issues, with the Toro Rosso team not ready with a full set of tires. Kvyat was later told to stop the engine during the elongated stop.

Ricciardo’s pace started to fade on the softs, but he’d have to hold back the Force India twins for the final podium spot. Ocon’s fresher tires favored him in this process and Force India hinted the two should switch a position around without actually saying as much.

Vettel pitted for ultrasofts, like Raikkonen did, for a final 18-lap sprint. Both would be faster than the Force Indias as the race would draw to its conclusion.

The question then shifted to whether the Force Indias would shift positions in an attempt to overtake Ricciardo. With that not happening, the two Ferraris then immediately caught up the Force Indias.

With just five laps to go Vettel, who’d gotten by Raikkonen after an off at the final chicane, was right behind Ocon.

It almost came to tears at Turn 1 on Lap 67. Ocon was forced off wide as Vettel went to the inside at Turn 1, but with Perez having backed them both up, Ocon lost the fifth position to Vettel.

Vettel then got by Perez with Ocon still stuck behind him. Raikkonen was seventh and Hulkenberg, Stroll, and Grosjean completed the points finishers.

Alonso was set for 10th before radioing in, “engine,” and stopping again – another bitter blow in his F1 season of discontent.

The unofficial results are below.

Audi bids farewell to Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich upon retirement

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Audi bid farewell to its iconic head of motorsport, Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich, at its end-of-season ‘Race Night’ event in Germany on Friday upon his retirement.

Ullrich took over the reins as Audi’s head of motorsport in 1993 and stayed in the role for 23 years, overseeing its arrival in the prototype class of sports car racing and domination of the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Ullrich stepped down from the position at the end of 2016, handing the reins over to ex-Audi DTM chief Dieter Gass, and attended his final racing event with the German marque at its first works Formula E outing in Hong Kong earlier this month.

Ullrich was honored at the Race Night event on Friday and thanked for his efforts in developing Audi into a force within global motorsport.

“In 566 factory-backed commitments during this period he celebrated 209 victories, 13 of them in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, eleven in the 12-hour race at Sebring and nine in the ‘Petit Le Mans’ at Road Atlanta,” a piece on Ullrich’s tenure for Audi’s website reads.

“31 driver titles in super touring car racing, in the DTM and in the sports prototype category are credited to him. 57 campaigners were Audi factory drivers during Wolfgang Ullrich’s era and he was responsible for 18 new developments of racing cars – an impressive tally.”