Photo: IndyCar

Newgarden not changing strategy due to championship lead

Leave a comment

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. – Josef Newgarden enters the final two races of the 2017 Verizon IndyCar Series season in somewhat unfamiliar territory. Despite being a championship contender the last two years (he finished seventh in 2015 after entering the season-ending GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma with a mathematical shot at the championship, and finished fourth last year), he wasn’t in command of the title picture at any point.

The 2017 season is a different story. On the strength of four wins, including last week’s victory over teammate Simon Pagenaud, Newgarden has vaulted himself 31 points clear of second-place Scott Dixon ahead of the final two races of the season.

Having such a lead might cause some to believe that Newgarden is changing his focus to play “prevent” in the final two races. However, as Newgarden explained in a Friday press conference at Watkins Glen International.

“To me, I think the safest thing is to keep doing what we’ve been doing,” Newgarden asserted emphatically.

He explained that 31 points is hardly a comfortable margin, given the manner in which points are distributed and the fact that the season finale in Sonoma is a double-points race, which means he can’t simply go into conservative mode.

“The way I look at it, it’s not a very safe lead, it’s really not,” Newgarden detailed. “Even if you say, ‘Well, okay, (Scott Dixon) is leading the race, we’re second or third, we should just stay put here and get some points’ – if we finish third, I think that closes it up enough to where Scott can be in striking distance at Sonoma, where if he wins the race, he wins the championship.”

Complicating matters further is the fact that all three of Newgarden’s Team Penske teammates are still mathematically alive in the championship, with Helio Castroneves and Simon Pagenaud especially within striking distance. As a result, none of them may be willing to play second-fiddle in a supporting role.

Conversely, Scott Dixon is the lone representative from Chip Ganassi Racing, meaning it’s possible that teammates Tony Kanaan, Max Chilton, and Charlie Kimball could play supporting roles to his championship chase.

And yet, the competitiveness within Team Penske is something Newgarden thrives on. “The best thing about Team Penske is they let us all race each other,” he revealed. “It’s kind of a dream situation. I think it’s awesome that Team Penske’s always done that. They’ve let their drivers race.”

And, unless one of his teammates is mathematically eliminated from title contention, that competitive atmosphere is unlikely to change in the final two races.

“Until there’s a clear situation where there’s nothing to gain for someone else – maybe all to gain for the team, then I think that might flip. But right now there’s no situation for that. I think everyone is still going to push as hard as they can and try and get the most points,” Newgarden finished.

 

Follow @KyleMLavigne

 

F1 2017 driver review: Lance Stroll

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Team: Williams

Car No.: 18
Races: 20
Wins: 0
Podiums: 1
Best Finish: P3 (Azerbaijan)
Pole Positions: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 40
Championship Position: 13th

Lance Stroll’s arrival in Formula 1 at the start of the 2017 was a far from smooth one despite a significant private testing program being undertaken in the months leading up to his grand prix debut.

Even with older hand Felipe Massa at Williams, Stroll looked uneasy behind the wheel of the FW40 car through the opening run of races as he failed to reach the checkered flag in any of his first three starts.

The Canadian was left deflated after his first decent effort in Bahrain was cut short after a clash with Carlos Sainz Jr., calling it his “rock bottom” moment – but things would turn around on home soil.

Stroll produced a stunning fight through the field to take an excellent P9 in Canada, proving his talent seen in Formula 3 the previous year and shushing many of his critics.

Better would follow two weeks later in Baku when Stroll became the youngest rookie in F1 history to score a podium, dodging a crazy race to finish third. It would have been second had he not lost a drag race against Valtteri Bottas to the line.

Stroll’s form then fluctuated greatly. He was sublime on occasion, the best examples being Monza, when he started a remarkable P2 on the grid and ended as the top midfielder in P7, or Mexico where he took a brilliant sixth.

But there were too many weekends he was a little anonymous. Sure, Williams didn’t have the best car this year, but perhaps a little better was expected from Stroll.

2018 will be an even bigger challenge as he looks to the lead the team when a new teammate arrives – and at only 19, it is a lot to handle. Nevertheless, there are positive signs to be found; you just need to look for them a little.

Season High: Taking a shock podium in Baku after dodging chaos in front.

Season Low: A poor opening two races in Australia and China.