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Newgarden, Dixon just miss out on Watkins Glen pole

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WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. – In the final minutes of Firestone Fast Six qualifying for the Verizon IndyCar Series, both Josef Newgarden and Scott Dixon appeared destined to score poles for Sunday’s INDYCAR Grand Prix at Watkins Glen.

First off, Newgarden was on his last run and looked set to turn the fastest lap of the session at that time. And while he did momentarily set the fastest lap, he ultimately left time on the table as he went a little wide exiting Turn 9 and dipped his wheels onto the grass, kicking up a big cloud of dust in the process.

He explained in the post-qualifying press conference that it ultimately cost him at least a couple tenths of a second, which would have made the difference in him securing the pole.

“I don’t think I’ve ever really had to say this much, but I think I messed up a pole run, to be honest with you,” Newgarden revealed. “I lost two or three tenths in the final corner. I don’t remember ever having to say that.”

Newgarden added that he overshot Turn 9 as a result of thinking he needed to charge through the corner in order jump over Dixon and the other Honda drivers.

“(The lap) was like projected at an 82.2 (seconds) going into Turn 9. If we want to beat Dixon, I’ve got to get everything out of (Turn 9) as well. I just deuced it, totally messed it up, lost a couple tenths. Great lap time, good starting position for us. I feel so silly for messing up what could have been a pole position.”

Like Newgarden, Scott Dixon felt like he left a pole on the table. Immediately after Newgarden’s aforementioned run, Dixon clocked in with a lap of 1:22.5168. In comparison to Newgarden’s lap (a 1:22.5169), the difference between the two was one ten-thousandth of a second, the smallest margin possible under IndyCar’s scoring system.

Scott Dixon appeared set to score the pole before Alexander Rossi took it from him with the last run of the day. Photo: IndyCar

However, on his next lap, Dixon came up on a slowing Helio Castroneves, delaying his run enough to force him to abort. Unable to get his Firestone black tires up to temperature after that, Dixon could not turn a faster lap, and ultimately had to settle for second when Alexander Rossi swooped in to take the pole with the last run of the session.

Although starting on the front row is a solid result on the surface, Dixon couldn’t help but be disappointed to miss out on the pole.

“The frustrating part is that we had plenty in hand,” Dixon lamented. “The problem is if you cool off (the tires) too much, it’s really hard to get back up to speed. We caught Helio so quickly – I don’t know what he was doing out there, he was just sort of cruising around. We caught him way too fast with two laps to go.”

Dixon added that he believed the car had plenty of speed in it to take the pole had he been able to get a cleaner run, as evidenced during Round 2 of qualifying, when he set a lap record with a lap time of 1:22.4171.

“I think we had probably another three or four tenths in the car. Definitely frustrating to lose it that way. We showed that speed definitely in Q2.”

The result ultimately proves critical in the championship chase, in which Newgarden leads Dixon by 31 points entering Sunday’s race, as neither driver was able to score a vital championship for the pole.

Newgarden, given that the events of qualifying prevented Dixon from securing that championship point, expressed a small amount of relief in considering that.

“Every point counts, so for sure I think it helps. It’s small, small little detail. But it adds up,” said Newgarden.

Dixon will flank pole sitter Alexander Rossi on the front row, while Newgarden will start third for Sunday’s INDYCAR Grand Prix at The Glen (1:00 p.m. ET, NBCSN).

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Montreal Mayor cancels Formula E’s planned season four finale

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New Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante has cancelled the FIA Formula E Championship’s planned season four finale, which was set for two races on July 28 and 29, 2018, citing what was termed a “financial fiasco.”

Plante was elected to replace Denis Coderre in the role, and didn’t follow Coderre’s support of the event.

She announced the news today citing financial and logistical challenges she didn’t feel the city could overcome.

Via a report in the CBC, Plante’s administration estimated a potential cost of up to $35 million would needed to be paid by the city’s taxpayers for the event’s second running. Additionally, a nonprofit organization reportedly owes creditors some $9.5 million.

Plante revealed details today in a series of messages posted on Twitter, which you can see in order below.

A Formula E spokesperson supplied a statement of the surprise news to e-racing365.com:

Formula E’s fourth season underwent one calendar change with a return to Punta Del Este, Uruguay replacing a cancelled race in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Whether a replacement can be sourced for this race weekend will now remain to be seen.