Photo: Scuderia Corsa

Scuderia Corsa resets after another title; adds MacNeil, WeatherTech

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Giacomo Mattioli’s Scuderia Corsa team has built up a pretty impressive reputation and record over five years. After debuting in 2012, the team won the 2013 GRAND-AM GT class title with Alessandro Balzan and has now won three straight IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship GT Daytona class titles, with Townsend Bell and Bill Sweedler in 2015 and now two in a row with Balzan and Christina Nielsen in 2016 and 2017.

Balzan’s had different co-drivers before and will add another new one to his plate in 2018, Cooper MacNeil having been confirmed Tuesday with WeatherTech Racing support for the team’s Ferrari 488 GT3 next season.

MacNeil has struggled to find the right similar championship-winning pedigree in the merged series after going back-to-back in the American Le Mans Series’ GTC class in 2012 and 2013 with Jeroen Bleekemolen, and has won only one race in the last four years. Whether it was with Leh Keen and Alex Job Racing or this year with both a Porsche and a Mercedes at Bill Riley’s usual title-contending operation, MacNeil, a true Silver-rated driver, has been unable to scale the same heights.

MacNeil joins the champs. Photo courtesy of IMSA

Moving into the team where he competes in Ferrari Challenge and was also in a GTE-spec 488 car with Bell and Sweedler at this year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans, and finishing third in the GTE-Am class, provides him arguably the best possible situation to re-enter the championship-winning frame in the series now sponsored by WeatherTech.

“We raced this year with Scuderia Corsa at Le Mans and finished third co-driving with Bill Sweedler and Townsend Bell,” MacNeil said. “I also race the full season of Ferrari Challenge with them and am in the hunt for the championship with two races left. It was a natural for us to transition into the Ferrari with our experience with the brand this season. I am looking forward to driving with Alessandro and we will be looking to equal the success the team had this year in IMSA and finish a couple places better at Le Mans too.”

Gunnar Jeannette, MacNeil’s 2017 full-season co-driver, and 2017 Michael Shank Racing driver Jeff Segal will round out this car’s lineup at the Rolex 24 at Daytona. Segal is a Ferrari GT specialist, having won all of the Rolex 24 at Daytona, Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring, 24 Hours of Le Mans and Sahlen’s 6 Hours of the Glen in a Ferrari. He shifted to Shank’s Acura NSX GT3 program this year.

Balzan and Nielsen. Photo courtesy of IMSA

For Balzan and Nielsen, it’s an end of an era after two very successful years where the measure of both championships was achieved by a wealth of consistency. This year, although the pairing won only once at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, a run of six straight podiums after a season-opening DNF at Daytona owing to an engine failure put them in a hole they’d need to dig out of.

“Already looking back now, six podiums in a row was kind of unreal!” Balzan told NBC Sports. “Plus we’ve gone all top fives except for one sixth. It was crazy. Scuderia Corsa always gave perfect car and strategy. We always stayed out of trouble. It was great.

“Winning at Laguna Seca was special. We’d started top-10 but I really wanted to win, as we were so close at the Glen and so close at Mosport before a technical issue. It was our home race and where I started racing with Scuderia Corsa five years ago. To win in front of our 200 guests, in a Ferrari in our 70th anniversary, was special.”

Balzan was key to note before the deal was struck to keep him with Scuderia Corsa next season, without Nielsen, he’s not actually a Ferrari factory driver despite the outward appearance as such.

“My history in the U.S. has always been with Scuderia Corsa and Ferrari. A lot of teams think I’m factory – I’m not – I’m proud to race Ferrari as an Italian American, but I have no straight connection.

“Making my debut with them at Le Mans this year, and with Christina and Bret (Curtis) was a dream come true. I had never been there before. I always said, if I go there, I go there to race… so I was a Le Mans beginner and a virgin! We had a lot of challenges there but Le Mans is Le Mans, and it was a beautiful thing… we learned a lot.”

Nielsen now faces an uncertain future as she looks to continue racing in IMSA and in North America. The Dane who now lives in Los Angeles has rapidly established herself over her three full-time seasons in contending for the title in all three years, and winning two of them. A Sebring win in 2016 in the debut of the 488 GT3 – driving with Balzan and Segal – stands out as a big win among others.

Winning in the second year of the car proved a testament to her ability and that of the team to note it wasn’t down to a car advantage.

“It feels amazing. It’s always easy to point fingers at first year with the car. But to do it a second year in a row, to know it, and go against a bunch of manufacturers, very professional teams and to be able to beat that feels absolutely amazing,” she said.

“To be in strong contention for championship, you can have one really bad DNF, and we had our’s at Daytona. We had no chance to do it again the rest of the year basically and we executed it.”

With the hope that Nielsen can land elsewhere on the GTD grid next season – she’s certainly deserving of a shot – it’ll be an intriguing subplot to see whether she or the revised Scuderia Corsa lineup will remain atop the GTD heap.

Neurosurgeon discusses brain injuries such as Michael Schumacher’s

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PARIS (AP) — More than four years after a ski accident caused him a near-fatal brain injury, little is known about Michael Schumacher’s current condition. Updates on his health have been extremely scarce ever since he left hospital in September 2014 to be cared for privately at his Swiss home on the shores of Lake Geneva. Details of his specific condition and the treatment he received have been kept strictly private. The last public statement 16 months ago clarified nothing further would be said.

Colin Shieff is a retired neurosurgeon from Britain’s National Health Service and a trustee of Headway, the national brain injury charity. Although he has never treated Schumacher, or spoken with doctors who’ve treated Schumacher over the years, he has dealt with similar cases both at immediate critical-care level and further down the line in terms of long-term treatment.

Shieff spent many years working with people with brain injuries and trauma, including at NATO field hospitals in Afghanistan an Iraq. He answered questions for The Associated Press related to the nature of Schumacher’s brain injury, pertaining to how his condition may have evolved in the time since his accident.

MORE: As F1 season begins, Michael Schumacher still fighting, far from forgotten

Q. In your opinion, what’s the likely prognosis at this stage?

A. “The nature of his injury and those bits of information that are available, and have been available, suggest that he has sustained permanent and very major damage to his brain. As a consequence his brain does not function in a fashion similar to yours or mine. The longer one goes on after an injury the more remote it is that any improvement becomes. He is almost certainly not going to change from the situation he is now.”

Q. What ongoing treatments would he be having?

A. “He will have the kind of treatment, which is care: giving him nourishment, giving him fluid. The probability is that this is given in the main – or at least as supplements – through some tube passed into his intestinal system, either through his nose or mouth, or more likely a tube in the front wall of the tummy. He will have therapy to sit him, because he won’t be able to get himself out of a bed and into a chair. He will be treated in a way that will ensure his limbs move and don’t remain rigid.”

Q. Would someone in his position receive around-the-clock treatment?

A. “He will be allowed a period of rest and sleep and relaxation, and he will be given an environment. I’m positive as I can be without knowing the facts (that) he will be living in an environment that – although it’s got artificial bits of medical kit and care and people – will mimic a caring, warm, pleasant, socially stimulating environment.”

Q. Would he be able to sense he’s in such an environment?

A. “I don’t know. There is always a technical, medical and neurological issue with defining a coma. Almost certainly he cannot express himself (in a conversation). He may well be able to indicate, or it may be apparent to those around him, that he is uncomfortable or unhappy. Or (he) is perhaps getting pleasure from seeing his children or hearing music he’s always liked, or having his hand stroked.”

Q. Are patients in his situation aware of touch and voice from family members?

A. “Absolutely. Even in the early stages, even in a critical care unit, when medicines are being given, for one individual at one time there may be an ability to discern and show response to someone they are familiar with. Respond to familiar, respond to family you’re triggered to. You hear them all your life so that’s the very, very familiar (aspect) the person is going to respond to.”

Q. Is there a chance he can make A) a full recovery? B) A partial recovery?

A. “First one, absolutely, totally no. Number one statistically, number two neurologically, and number three he’s been ill for so long. He’s lost muscle bulk, even if he opened his eyes and started talking there will have been loss of memory, there will be impact on behavior, on cognitive functions. He would not be the same person. (As for a) partial recovery, even the smallest thing that gets better is some kind of recovery. But (it depends) whether that recovery contributes to a functional improvement for him to be able to express himself – other than an evidence of saying `Yes’ or an evidence of saying `No.’ (Therefore) if he could use words of two syllables, if he could turn on the remote control for the tele. One can do, professionally, all sorts of wonderful things with electronic devices and couple them up to eye and mouth movements. Sometimes with a person in a situation called `Locked In’ or `Profoundly neurologically comprised’ – which is essentially paralysis but with continuing intellectual function – ways can be found to communicate with those people. If that had been so with Michael Schumacher I am positive we would have known that is the case, so I don’t believe it’s so for him.”

Q. This is a deeply personal decision for the family. But how long can treatment last for?

A. “In, for example, our health system we don’t have the luxury to keep maximal intervention going in a high-tech hospital environment. For Michael Schumacher’s family, I suspect they have the financial support to be able to provide those things. Therefore, for him, the future is longer but it doesn’t imply any change in the quality of it.”

Q. Some reports have estimated the cost of treatment at anything up to 200,000 euros ($245,000) per week. Is that realistic?

A. “I would personally think that’s over the top, in terms of what I reckon that might buy him. He’ll have a nurse, a therapist, a visiting doctor. There’ll be an extra pair of hands when something physical is being done, when he’s being moved to somewhere. That doesn’t add up to 150,000 euros or 200,000 euros. He needs essentially, somebody with nursing or therapeutic qualifications with him at all times. So that’s however many people you need to run a 24/7 roster. You’re talking probably eight people to provide that level of care constantly over a year’s period. That’s the number of nurses required for instance, to nurse or to staff, one critical care bed in an intensive care unit.”

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