Photo courtesy IndyCar

Proposed windscreen for IndyCar passes first on-track test

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AVONDALE, Ariz. (AP) — With Scott Dixon at the wheel, the prototype for a windscreen to help protect IndyCar drivers from flying debris passed its first on-track test on Thursday, a big step toward requiring such devices, perhaps as early as next year.

“It’s definitely a milestone as far as moving forward and moving in the right direction for some more safety initiatives, and we all know the reasons why,” the four-time IndyCar Series champion said.

The only real problem for Dixon, he said, was the lack of air flow made things quite warm. But he described that as “an easy fix.”

“The cooling thing we kind of knew,” Dixon said, “but we just didn’t want to deal with it right now.”

Jeff Horton, IndyCar director of engineering and safety and head of the windscreen project, was happy with the results.

“When a guy like Scott gets out, a veteran of ours, and says there’s no deal breakers, a couple of small things to look at, what better could you ask for,” Horton said.

The windscreen wouldn’t prevent all flying-debris accidents since material still could sail over the front of the screen or come in on top of the driver, who otherwise is protected only by a helmet. Driver Justin Wilson died in August 2015 of injuries he sustained when he was struck by flying debris in an IndyCar race at Pocono Raceway.

But IndyCar officials see the windscreen as potentially a big improvement in safety. With more testing to be done, the windscreen probably wouldn’t be required on the circuit until 2019 at the earliest.

The screen, made up of a new material called Opticore, is four-tenths of an inch thick and rises at a 25-degree angle.

“It’s a little bit different looking through something that’s so thick,” Dixon said, “but I thought it would have messed with my distortion a lot more but there was nothing like that. There was no problem with reflection. … The weirdest thing was just how quiet it is. You have no buffeting. The car feels very smooth.”

Next up is a ballistics test, when researchers will find out just how much the screen can take from small, medium and large size debris.

Dixon drove the Chip Ganassi Racing team Honda at speeds of up to 190 mph on the track at ISM Raceway, formerly Phoenix International Raceway and site of two NASCAR and one IndyCar races each year.

“Whether we’re developing foam for the car and stuff or whatever, it’s always exciting to do the test and have it a success,” Horton said. “And trust me, we’ve had many non-successful things and we just go figure out the solution and keep working.”

Dixon said earlier problems with potential limits in peripheral vision had been resolved.

But, he said, “you’re looking through quite a substantial amount of glass or material. It just takes your eyes a little bit to adjust to how you look through it.”

The reaction could be different from driver to driver, Dixon said, so the New Zealander suggested everyone get to test the screen.

“This may affect other guys in different ways so it’s something that everybody needs to almost try,” he said. “It ran with little to no problems but it could affect others.”

Dixon said he would like to see if he gets more used to it over time.

“Your brain and eyes just need to catch up to it,” he said. “The longer that I ran I got more adept to it.”

Before Thursday, the screen had been tested only in a wind tunnel. On Thursday, Dixon drove the Honda in sunshine, at dusk and at night with the track lights on. He spoke to reporters after the first run but didn’t foresee any problems when the light changed.

The current project has been ongoing for two years.

Formula One teams have been testing a “halo” windscreen, but it’s an entirely separate exercise.

“We’ve shared with them,” Horton said. “We don’t know the exact stuff that they’re using right now.”

NHRA: Brittany Force cleared to race this weekend in Phoenix after bad wreck 2 weeks ago

Photo: John Force Racing
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Drag racing is a Force family tradition. So, too, is not keeping a Force family member down.

Just 12 days after the most serious wreck of her six-year drag racing career, Brittany Force and John Force Racing announced late Thursday afternoon that the defending 2017 NHRA Top Fuel champion has been medically cleared and will indeed race in this weekend’s NHRA Arizona Nationals at Wild Horse Pass Motorsports Park in suburban Phoenix, Arizona.

“I flew into Phoenix early this (Thursday) morning and headed straight out to the race track to meet up with my team,” Force said. “I suited up and got belted back into my car that I ran all last season.

“It honestly felt good to be strapped back in and I was surprised how comfortable I was. I’m looking forward to getting back in my car tomorrow (Friday’s first two rounds of qualifying) and getting back in the swing of things with my guys.”

The 31-year-old Force, one of four daughters of 16-time NHRA Funny Car champ John Force, suffered a concussion and bruising after the hard crash she was involved in on February 11 in the first round of eliminations of the season-opening NHRA Lucas Oil Winternationals in Pomona, California.

Shortly after leaving the starting line in a race vs. Terry Haddock, Force’s dragster crossed from the right to left lanes, impacted the retaining wall with a very hard lateral crash, bounced off, spun, went on its side and briefly caught fire after crossing the finish line wheels-up.

While she is still recovering from the bruising, Force feels strong enough to get back behind the wheel. Getting back in the race car could be the best medicine of all, since she has three runner-up finishes in Phoenix, including back-to-back second-place showings in both the 2016 and 2017 national events.

The three-day event kicks off Friday with qualifying rounds at 4 and 6:30 p.m. ET, the same times as Saturday’s qualifying. Final eliminations begin at 1 p.m. ET Sunday.