Photo: IndyCar

Rookies’ strong weekends unravel on race day in St. Petersburg

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Rookies rose to the occasion on Friday and Saturday at the Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, with three qualifying in the six – Robert Wickens, who started on the pole, Matheus Leist, who started third, and Jordan King, who started fourth.

However, all three came crashing back down to Earth on race day, suffering big problems that knocked them out of contention, or out of the race entirely.

Things got off to a promising start, as Wickens, King, and Leist ran 1-2-3 in the early laps, with King even briefly leading after passing Wickens on a Lap 6 restart.

However, before too long, things started to fall apart. Leist was the first victim, with a gearbox issue causing the A.J. Foyt Racing driver to get stuck in third gear. While he eventually rejoined, Leist’s day went from bad to worse, as he drifted wide in Turn 3 on Lap 28 and smacked the outside wall, ending his race on the spot. He finished 24th.

“Today it was unfortunate,” Leist lamented before subsequently going into more detail about his day.

“We had a shifting problem when I was running fourth, so I couldn’t change gears up or down. I stayed in pit lane for like 10 laps trying to solve the problem. Then we had another problem and came back to the pits. The third time I went back on the track, I had a mega understeer going into Turn 3 and I missed the corner and hit the wall.”

King was the next victim, as the Ed Carpenter Racing driver suffered a cut tire and then suspension damage that forced him to pit for repairs. He did rejoin the race, but was three laps down and languished in 21st at the end.

“After the first stop, we picked up a puncture and slid against the wall and had some damage. It was frustrating more than anything to be hindered by that,” King revealed.

King did express confidence after showing impressive form, but couldn’t help but be disappointed that circumstances didn’t let him and ECR cash in.

“Overall, I am happy from the sense that the speed is there, but disappointed to throw away a result,” King finished. “I know not every weekend is going to be like this, but it was great to be fast and challenging for the race win. It just hurts a bit when you throw away a good result like that.”

And, finally, Wickens’ day came undone in the final laps after dominating most of the race from the pole. The 28-year-old Schmidt Peterson Motorsports driver needed to fend off Andretti Autosport’s Alexander Rossi on a pair of late-race restarts as he looked to secure a win on his Verizon IndyCar Series debut.

The first restart, with four laps to go, went well for Wickens. The second restart, with two laps remaining, did not, as Rossi got loose under braking while trying to pass Wickens. The two made contact, sending Wickens into a spin and into the Turn 1 wall. Wickens, after leading the most laps, had to settle for 18th.

Robert Wickens had victory snatched away following contact with Alexander Rossi with two laps remaining in the Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg. Photo: IndyCar

“I gave him space around the outside. I broke late. I made the corner and then we had some contact, and obviously it put me into a spin into the wall. I ended my day with one lap left in the race. Not the way I imagined the day going for the No. 6 Lucas Oil SPM Honda,” explained a gutted Wickens afterward.

Wickens added that confusion over the final restart – the pace car was not called in until a few corners before the green flag flew – made matters worse for him, and may have set up the chaos on the ensuing restart.

“It was all a little bit confusing because I was told on the radio we were going green, but they didn’t turn the lights off the pace car, so I didn’t get the best restart I could have done. Probably the worst one of the whole day,” he explained. “I want to kind of speak to the officials to see why they didn’t turn the lights off the pace car before we went green but I don’t know.”

Of note: Juncos Racing’s Rene Binder endured a tough day as well, nosing into the Turn 1o tire barriers with eight laps remaining, essentially setting the late-race chaos into motion in the process. He finished 22nd.

Of the other two rookies, Andretti Autosport’s Zach Veach Dale Coyne Racing’s Zachary Claman De Melo, finished 16th and 17th after relatively quiet days, while Michael Shank Racing and SPM driver Jack Harvey crashed out due to a cut tire on Lap 39.


Mercedes: F1 teams need to work together to avoid split

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MELBOURNE, Australia — Mercedes boss Toto Wolff said Friday that Formula One teams have a responsibility to try to overcome their differences over the future of the sport in the face of a threat by Ferrari to quit because of a number of proposed changes.

Bernie Ecclestone, who ran F1 for 40 years before being replaced by new owners Liberty Media last year, has raised the possibility that Ferrari chairman Sergio Marchionne could walk away from F1 and form a breakaway series over Liberty’s future vision for the sport.

Ferrari is unhappy with Liberty’s proposal to simplify engines and redistribute prize money among F1 teams after the current contract with teams expires at the end of 2020.

Ferrari team boss Maurizio Arrivabene would not comment on the specifics of Marchionne’s previous comments at the season-opening Australian Grand Prix on Friday, but said: “My only suggestion, please take him seriously.”

Wolff is also taking the possibility of Ferrari walking away seriously. He told Britain’s Press Association before the Australian GP that he agreed with Marchionne’s concerns and that Formula One can’t afford to alienate Ferrari or lose the team.

“Don’t mess with Sergio Marchionne,” he said. “Formula One needs Ferrari much more than Ferrari needs Formula One.”

Wolff was more diplomatic on Friday, saying he hopes all sides could come together for the good of the sport.

“I think this as much a battle on track as much as it is a fight off track for an advantage,” he said. “It is clear the current governance and how the rules are being made is not very functional. There’s too much different opinions and agendas on the table and we need to sort it for 2021 for the best interest of the sport.”

Red Bull boss Christian Horner agreed there are too many competing agendas, suggesting that the FIA-Formula One’s governing body-and Liberty Media come together to decide on a set of regulations and financial framework for the next contract and the teams can then decide if they want to accept it or not.

“Trying to get a consensus between teams that have varying objectives, different set-ups, is going to be impossible,” he said. “It’s history repeating itself. It happens every five or six years, every time the Concorde Agreement comes up for renewal.”

Tempers also flared during Friday’s media conference over another issue of contention between the teams – Ferrari’s recent hiring of FIA’s ex-safety director, Laurent Mekies.

Horner believes Ferrari broke an agreement among teams at a recent meeting to institute a 12-month waiting period for any former employee of FIA or FOM (Formula One Management) to be able to start working for one of F1’s teams. The concern is that former FIA staff who go to work for a specific team could share secrets from other teams.

“Certain teams were pushing for that period to be three years, but in the end it was agreed upon being 12 months,” he said. “It almost makes those meetings pointless if we can’t agree on something and action it.”

Arrivabene defended Ferrari’s move, saying Mekies would not join its team until after a six-month “gardening leave” period.

“There is nothing wrong with that because we were absolutely respecting the local law, the Swiss local law where Laurent was hired,” he said.