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Esteban Gutierrez confirmed at Techeetah Formula E

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Mexican driver Esteban Gutierrez’s team of choice has been confirmed for the balance of the FIA Formula E Championship third season. He’ll run with the Techeetah team, having been announced there today. Gutierrez joins FE after three race seasons and one reserve season in F1, having most recently competed with Haas F1 Team last year in its debut year.

Gutierrez replaces Ma Qing Hua in the active race lineup alongside Jean-Eric Vergne starting from the Mexico City ePrix to be held on April 1, Ma having been relegated to third driver.

“I am very grateful to join Techeetah, a team with real competitiveness,” Gutierrez said in a release. “After four years of incredible experience in F1, I’m now taking a step forward in the future of motorsports. I am especially excited about my debut race in Mexico City. Hopefully I can put on a good show for the passionate home fans.”

Managing director Ivan Yim added, “We are delighted to welcome Esteban to Techeetah. We will have Esteban as prepared as possible for his home race. With the passionate Mexican fans awaiting in the stadium section, the Techeetah team is highly motivated with its new driver lineup.”

Agag expects Gutierrez to mount Formula E title charge in season four

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FIA Formula E CEO Alejandro Agag believes that recent Formula 1 driver Esteban Gutierrez can become a title contender when he races full-time in the all-electric championship.

After losing his seat with the Haas team at the end of the 2016 season, Gutierrez announced earlier this week that he would be joining Formula E for the race in Mexico City in April.

The 2010 GP3 champion is set to also feature in New York City before securing a full-season seat for the championship’s fourth campaign, due to start in the fall of 2017.

Speaking to the Formula E website, Agag spoke warmly of Gutierrez’s arrival, before adding that he believes the Mexican can become a title contender.

“I think that’s great news for the championship,” Agag said.

“We’ve known Esteban for a long time. I was in GP2 when Esteban was there and obviously he’s a great driver. He’s a young driver and has a long career in front of him and is choosing to follow his career after Formula 1 in Formula E.

“At his age, I see a very bright future for him. I think it’s going to be great for the Mexico race to have a local star for the fans to cheer for.

“This year Esteban is going to be on a learning curve in Formula E. He’s missed two races of the season already, so it’s not a season for him to try to win the championship, but a season to learn.

“He’ll race in Mexico and New York. We have a few clashes with other championships that will free up seats and for him to occupy those seats and to learn.

“And then after that in season four, I think he’ll have a proper race driver and will be one of the guys who is going to fight for the championship.”

Gutierrez is expected to step in for one of the drivers unable to race in Mexico and New York due to the clashes with the FIA World Endurance Championship.

Gutierrez joins FIA Formula E grid for selected races

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Esteban Gutierrez will join the FIA Formula E Championship field for at least two races in season three, bringing another Formula 1 veteran into the all-electric open-wheel championship.

The Haas F1 refugee, currently without a seat for the 2017 season and with his only race option likely to be the Manor team if it even makes the grid, will saddle up for his Formula E debut at Mexico City on April 1 with a second outing during the New York City ePrix two-race weekend July 15-16.

No team was revealed during his announcement today, but it was confirmed that Gutierrez will be an official series ambassador. He’s also firmly in talks with a number of teams about joining the grid full-time for season four, the 2017-2018 campaign.

F1 2016 Driver Review: Esteban Gutierrez

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Esteban Gutierrez

Team: Haas F1 Team
Car No.: 21
Races: 21
Podiums: 0
Best Finish: 11th (Spain, Monaco, Austria, Germany, Singapore)
Fastest Laps: 0
Points: 0
Laps Led: 0
Championship Position: 21st

Luke Smith (@LukeSmithF1)

As a big believer in Esteban Gutierrez, I really thought that 2016 was the year he would come good and prove his worth to Formula 1. Sadly, it wasn’t to be, with the season including a number of missed opportunities and some slices of bad luck.

I had a running joke on Twitter that P11 should be renamed ‘PGutierrez’, given he always seemed to be running 11th (he spent 132 laps in 11th, more than any other driver). And that really summed up his season: on the fringe of points, but never quite in there.

Gutierrez looked more at ease when F1 hit Europe, but the early jitters were then replaced by frustration. His reaction to retiring in Brazil really summed up how sour things had got for the Mexican.

Given the 29-0 points loss to teammate Romain Grosjean, the VF-16 Haas car clearly had what it took to give Gutierrez his chance to shine. It wasn’t taken.

Tony DiZinno (@tonydizinno)

Esteban Gutierrez scored five 11th-place finishes in 2016. Such a statistic is the perfect characterization of Esteban Gutierrez’s F1 career – so close, yet so far away.

While Romain Grosjean seized every opportunity available to capture points this year for Haas, Gutierrez came up just shy every time, and sometimes that was with better qualifying runs that got him into Q3.

It was a frustrating year for Gutierrez, from the consternation in the buildup to Melbourne as highlighted in an NBCSN documentary, to the Melbourne crash with Fernando Alonso, to the disagreement caught on camera in Brazil. Gutierrez seems confident he has a future in F1 but it won’t be at Haas in 2017, after a tough season.

As F1 silly season winds down, who’s in the race for the final four seats?

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The past two weeks have seen the 2017 driver markets for MotorSportsTalk’s two primary series, Formula 1 and IndyCar, develop very, very quickly.

Over in IndyCar, a flurry of confirmations mean that just two seats remain up for grabs: one at Chip Ganassi Racing, filled in 2016 by Max Chilton, and one for the street and road courses at Ed Carpenter Racing.

The F1 driver market was expected to be particularly volatile heading into 2017, but Red Bull’s early promotion of Max Verstappen and Ferrari’s decision to keep Kimi Raikkonen on for another year left it looking pretty stationary.

Things moved along quickly when Nico Hulkenberg decided to leave Force India for Renault, setting off a chain reaction that has seen Esteban Ocon move up as his replacement, Kevin Magnussen move to Haas and leave just four seats up for grabs: two at Sauber and two at Manor.

So who is in the race for the remaining seats? The names to work with here are Felipe Nasr, Marcus Ericsson, Pascal Wehrlein, Esteban Gutierrez, Rio Haryanto and Jordan King. It is likely that four of the six will fill out the grid.

Sauber F1 Team

Sauber’s fortunes for 2017 may remain bleak given the team’s decision to stick with a 2016-spec Ferrari power unit.

Yet with Longbow Finance’s takeover complete, the recruitment drive ongoing and, most importantly, the team poised for a multi-million dollar windfall all thanks to Felipe Nasr’s ninth-place finish in Brazil, things aren’t as bad as they once looked.

The result saw Sauber move above Manor in the constructors’ championship, with the difference between P10 and P11 equating to a reported $15 million in prize money.

Both Nasr and Ericsson pushed to secure a move to Force India, only to lose out to Ocon. Both bring decent financial backing to Sauber, with Ericsson also reportedly enjoying links to Longbow. As a result, it would be a big surprise to see the Swede racing elsewhere in 2017.

The question mark hangs over Nasr. He may have been a step above Ericsson on track, but off it, his reliance on Banco do Brasil and the current financial crisis facing Brazil may be an issue.

A possible option for Sauber is Gutierrez, who spent two years racing with the team in 2013 and 2014. His departure wasn’t on the best of terms, but he was spotted talking to his former boss, Monisha Kaltenborn, in Brazil; no real effort was made to hide that fact, either.

Gutierrez brings decent backing from Mexico, so would definitely be an option, relying the scars of his exit have healed for both sides.

Manor Racing

Just as Nasr’s points in Brazil boost Sauber’s fortunes, they hamper Manor’s. The British minnows will most probably need to secure a pay driver’s services for 2017 as a replacement for the Force India-bound Ocon.

Wehrlein’s debut season in F1 has been an odd one. His charge to P10 in Austria marked just the second points finish in Manor’s seven-season history, yet his failure to outclass early-year teammate Rio Haryanto and subsequent struggles against Ocon, who only made his debut in August, piqued enough concern for Force India to pass on him as Hulkenberg’s replacement.

Wehrlein will be keen to remain with Manor next year, and it could be that the likes of Gutierrez and Nasr push to join him. Both have backing (the latter’s admittedly uncertain), and both will benefit from 2017-spec Mercedes engines. It’s not unthinkable that Manor should run ahead of Sauber in the pecking order next year, making a move to the team desirable.

Haryanto was forced to give up his seat after Germany due to a shortfall in funding, but the Indonesian is apparently back in contention for a seat next year. Another option is Jordan King, who races in GP2 and is Manor’s development driver. He too would bring some backing.

Manor has no shortage of pay drivers to choose from. The big questions that will determine its decision are how crucial keeping Wehrlein is to its relationship with Mercedes, and what level of funding is now required after losing P10 in the constructors’ championship.

Perhaps the oddest thing in all of this is that both F1 and IndyCar look set to have their 2017 grids set before the end of the calendar year. As my colleague Tony DiZinno noted yesterday, Dale Coyne Racing has traditionally left things as late as possible; Manor is perhaps the equivalent in F1.

If things can be firmed up early, though, then the team will surely benefit from the stability that comes with it.