nico rosberg

Getty Images

Rosberg, Button soak up their first weekends out of F1 (PHOTOS)

1 Comment

Since 2008, Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel have won seven World Championships. The two drivers that won titles in that period not named Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel – Nico Rosberg (2016) and Jenson Button (2009) – were both enjoying their first weekends not on a Formula 1 grid as full-time drivers for the first time in more than a decade this weekend as the 2017 season commenced at Melbourne’s Albert Park.

Rosberg made a visit to preseason testing in Barcelona a few weeks ago for his first appearance as spectator since winning the World Championship. But he watched from home this weekend with his family and posted a few thoughts during both qualifying and the race:

We’re now quite familiar with Rosberg’s home TV set and coffee table. This is the first time Rosberg has been out of an F1 race since 2005, the year he won the first GP2 championship.

Button meanwhile paid a visit to California for the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series weekend at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana… once he got off his couch. He checked in with seven-time champion Jimmie Johnson at Fontana.

Do you guys know if there's anything good to watch on tele this weekend? @storm_and_rogue_pomskies

A post shared by Jenson Button (@jensonbutton_22) on

Given McLaren Honda’s struggles, Button is probably smart to have got out when he did. He’d been on the grid since 2000, save for a couple races out in 2005 when BAR-Honda was barred from competing after being disqualified from the San Marino Grand Prix.

Meanwhile for Rosberg, he watched as Mercedes was unable to win the season opener for the first time since 2013.

Formula 1 2017 preview: Offseason recap

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The gap between the end of the 2016 Formula 1 season and the start of the 2017 campaign perhaps feels like the least ‘offseason-y’ offseason of recent times.

Since the checkered flag dropped in Abu Dhabi and Nico Rosberg claimed his maiden drivers’ title, a huge amount has happened.

So here’s a run-down of all that has happened over the winter.

November 27 – Nico Rosberg clinches his maiden F1 world title in Abu Dhabi, finishing second in the race to win the championship by five points. Felipe Massa makes what was planned to be his final F1 start.

December 2 – Rosberg announces his immediate retirement from F1 in a press conference ahead of the FIA gala in Vienna, Austria.

December 11 – Hamilton and Wolff enjoy an “amazing” meeting regarding plans for the 2017 season. Hamilton says Mercedes will have “the strongest partnership” to defend its titles. BBC Sport reports that Valtteri Bottas is Mercedes’ prime target and has already tabled an offer for the Finn.

December 15 – Mercedes confirms that it will make no announcement regarding Rosberg’s replacement until January 3 at the earliest. Claire Williams says that Williams was open to letting Bottas leave, relying it could find a suitable replacement.

December 20 – Reports suggest that Massa has agreed to come out of retirement and return to Williams for 2017, paving the way for Bottas to leave the team.

December 30 – Massa posts on Instagram that he is back “training hard” in America.

January 3 – The earliest date for an announcement from Mercedes passes.

January 6 – Manor – the team Wehrlein raced for last year – enters administration, raising doubts over the team’s future and place on the 2017 grid.

January 10 – Mercedes confirms Paddy Lowe will leave the team after three years.

January 15 – Claire Williams says she expects to make an announcement about Bottas’ future within a week.

January 16 – Pascal Wehrlein is officially announced by Sauber; photos of Bottas in Mercedes team gear leak online; Williams confirms Massa will return; finally, Bottas is announced officially at Mercedes.

January 19 – Mercedes signs British youngster George Russell to its junior program.

January 20 – Liberty Media offers shares to F1 teams ahead of takeover.

January 22 – Pascal Wehrlein pulls out of the Race of Champions’ second day through injury.

January 23 – Liberty Media completes its takeover of F1, ousting CEO Bernie Ecclestone and ending his 40-year rein at the helm of the sport. Chase Carey becomes CEO, appointing Sean Bratches and Ross Brawn into top roles.

January 26 – Renault names BP/Castrol as new fuel and lubricants supplier.

January 27 – Manor confirms it will close after failing to find a buyer, costing over 200 jobs.

February 4 – Ferrari president Sergio Marchionne calls on Liberty to make F1 more entertaining.

February 7 – McLaren confirms that racing CEO Jost Capito has left the team after just five months.

February 9 – McLaren team manager Dave Redding confirms he will move to Williams.

February 10 – BP/Castrol also becomes McLaren’s new fuel and lubricants partner; Ferrari forced to postpone a private Pirelli test after Sebastian Vettel suffers a crash.

February 16 – Mercedes announces that ex-Ferrari man James Allison will become its new technical director; the FIA responds to “malicious” reports regarding the sale of F1; McLaren marketing chief Ekrem Sami leaves the team; Dirk de Beer becomes Williams’ new aero chief.

February 17 – Williams releases renders of its new car, the FW40.

February 20 – Sauber presents C36 car, celebrating 25 years in F1.

February 21 – Renault reveals R.S.17, targets top five finish in the championship.

February 22 – British youngster Lando Norris joins McLaren’s junior program; Force India reveals VJM10 car for 2017.

February 23 – Mercedes unveils 2017 F1 car, completes filming day.

February 24 – McLaren and Ferrari unveil their cars. McLaren’s takes the most note for a bright orange livery.

February 26 – Red Bull, Haas and Toro Rosso reveal their 2017 runners.

February 27 – Pre-season testing begins in Barcelona.

February 28 – Sauber appoints Tatiana Calderon as its new development driver.

March 2 – The first test ends with Valtteri Bottas as the fastest driver. Williams and McLaren endure difficult runs, while Mercedes and Ferrari steal a march on the field.

March 4 – McLaren denies there are any fundamental issues with the Honda power unit.

March 7 – Test two begins.

March 8 – Fernando Alonso blasts Honda, says its power unit has “no reliability” and “no power”.

March 9 – The FIA announces that GP2 will be known as Formula 2 from 2017.

March 10 – Pre-season testing comes to a close. Kimi Raikkonen ends as the quickest driver for Ferrari; 1964 world champion John Surtees dies at the age of 83.

March 16 – Paddy Lowe joins Williams as chief technical officer, having left his role at Mercedes earlier in the winter; Mika Hakkinen becomes McLaren ambassador; reports suggest McLaren has approached Mercedes regarding an engine supply.

March 18 – Manor’s remaining F1 assets are listed for auction.

Wolff: Hamilton-Rosberg F1 rivalry became too intense

Getty Images
2 Comments

Mercedes Formula 1 chief Toto Wolff feels that the rivalry between Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg became more intense than the team felt comfortable with towards the end of their partnership in 2016.

Hamilton and Rosberg teamed up in F1 at Mercedes in 2013, the pair having known each other for almost 20 years and raced together in go-karts as teammates.

Hamilton edged Rosberg to win world titles in 2014 and 2015, before Rosberg struck back with a maiden championship victory last year, announcing his retirement from racing just five days later.

The pair enjoyed a fierce rivalry throughout their time as teammates, featuring a number of on-track clashes before culminating in Hamilton defying team orders in a last-ditch effort to deny Rosberg the title in Abu Dhabi last November.

Speaking to The Guardian, Wolff lifted the lid on the partnership between Hamilton and Rosberg, saying that their history together added an extra dynamic to the rivalry that turned negative.

“Towards the end it was more intense than we would have thought beneficial,” Wolff said.

“What was beneficial at the beginning, that they knew each other for 20 years also meant towards the end that there was lots of baggage carried over and things we weren’t even aware of.”

Wolff said that Hamilton’s relationship with new teammate Valtteri Bottas “starts at zero” in 2017 as Mercedes looks to capture both F1 crowns for the fourth year in succession.

Hamilton’s future has been subject to comments from ex-F1 drivers Damon Hill and David Coulthard in recent weeks. Hill stressed that Mercedes must be willing to give the three-time world champion freedom or risk losing him. Coulthard even went as far to say that Hamilton could quit F1 altogether should he grow disillusioned with the sport.

However, Wolff said that he would rather have stressful drivers to manage that were among the best in the world as opposed to an easy ride and sub-standard racers.

“The best ones are all not easy. This makes them the best,” Wolff said.

“After four years we have got to know each other and we kind of get the vibes. We are on this journey together and most of our objectives are aligned most of the time but not always, and we recognize that.

“We respect him as an individual, we respect him as a personality and we respect him as a racing driver.”

Formula 1 2017 team preview: Mercedes

Getty Images
1 Comment

MotorSportsTalk’s preview of the new Formula 1 season begins with the first of our team-by-team snapshots – and where else could we start than with defending champions Mercedes?

Mercedes has dominated proceedings in F1 over the past three years, taking 51 race wins in that period and clinching six world titles (three drivers’, three constructors’) in the process. It has been a period of dominance rarely seen in F1.

But will that continue into 2017 with the new technical regulations?

DRIVERS

44. Lewis Hamilton (Great Britain)
77. Valtteri Bottas (Finland)

CAR

Mercedes W08 EQ Power+

ENGINE

Mercedes M08 EQ Power+

TEAM CHIEFS

Toto Wolff (executive director)
Niki Lauda (non-executive director)
James Allison (technical director)

MONTMELO, SPAIN – MARCH 10: Valtteri Bottas driving the (77) Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team Mercedes F1 WO8 on track during the final day of Formula One winter testing at Circuit de Catalunya on March 10, 2017 in Montmelo, Spain. (Photo by Charles Coates/Getty Images)

What went right in 2016: Basically everything. The tense rivalry between Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg was handled pretty well by the team, even with the title on the line in Abu Dhabi. Had it not been for their first-lap crash in Spain and Hamilton’s cruel engine failure in Malaysia, Mercedes would most probably have swept the board for wins. Still, 19 out of 21 ain’t bad.

What went wrong in 2016: Hamilton was particularly unlucky when it came to power unit reliability, undoubtedly costing him a fair shot at the title. The engine team at Brixworth will have focused on this over the winter. The clash between Rosberg and Hamilton in Austria was also unfortunate. Otherwise, Mercedes was spick and span last year.

What’s changed for 2017: The biggest change is the arrival of Valtteri Bottas in place of Nico Rosberg, who sensationally retired from racing just five days after winning the world title in Abu Dhabi. Bottas joins from Williams after four seasons in F1. The other big change is the exit of previous technical boss Paddy Lowe, who has joined Williams, and the arrival of ex-Ferrari technical chief James Allison. Oh, and the car is significantly different in design, but that’s the same for all teams in 2017.

What they’ll look to accomplish in 2017: Anything but another double title success would surely go down as a failure for Mercedes. Its form over the past three years has been such that we’d be foolish to expect otherwise. But considering Ferrari’s pre-season pace and the expected revival of Red Bull, the pressure may be ramped up this year. At this rate, the question may no longer ‘how much by’ regarding Mercedes’ title win, but ‘if’ once again…

NORTHAMPTON, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 23: Lewis Hamilton of Great Britain and Mercedes GP shares a joke with Valtteri Bottas of Finland and Mercedes GP during the launch of the Mercedes formula one team’s 2017 car, the W08, at Silverstone Circuit on February 23, 2017 in Northampton, England. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

MST PREDICTIONS

Luke Smith: Mercedes is something of an enigma heading into 2017 after a so-so off-season – but I will still back the Silver Arrows to take another title double, albeit not with the ease the previous three have arrived. Lewis Hamilton will take his fourth world title this year, with Valtteri Bottas becoming a grand prix winner at last. I’ll say for them to take say 14 of the 20 races this year, 9-5 in Hamilton’s favor.

Tony DiZinno: They’ve lost only eight races in the last three years and even with the changes to the regulations this season, it’s hard to see them losing too many more again. Lewis Hamilton should be primed to take the title in a cakewalk because I don’t see Valtteri Bottas being consistently fast enough to contend after taking over from Nico Rosberg, and I do see the Red Bull pair taking points off each other in their own intra-team rivalry.

Kyle Lavigne: Of the eight days of Formula 1 pre-season testing at the Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, the Mercedes AMG Petronas cars led three of them. That’s less than Scuderia Ferrari, who led four, but still an indication that the Silver Arrows are just as strong as ever. What’s more, they began their race simulations on Day 2, a clear sign that they are very happy with the pace and reliability of the W08.

Valtteri Bottas should contend for race wins, and could easily win multiple races in 2017. However, it will be difficult for him to regularly challenge Lewis Hamilton for the drivers’ championship. Bottas will undoubtedly be a quick shoe, but Hamilton is still very much for the championship favorite.

 

Nico Rosberg returns to visit testing, hails ‘monster’ 2017 cars

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The 2016 Formula 1 World Champion Nico Rosberg is back… sort of.

The recently retired Rosberg paid his first visit to the Circuit de Catalunya-Barcelona on Wednesday for the third day of this week’s first test of the offseason to catch up with his colleagues at Mercedes AMG Petronas, check out the new 2017 cars and offer his thoughts on the atmosphere and season ahead.

Rosberg posted a video to Twitter after he left the track this afternoon and immediately hailed the new cars as “proper monsters,” which he hopes will push drivers to their physical limits this season. Rosberg also thanked Liberty Media Corporation, F1’s new owners, for allowing pit lane activity and some track activity to be posted in short videos.

“It was a nice experience for me to see my racing family again. It was fun!” Rosberg said. “It’s great to see the new cars. It’s definitely looking good on that front, because they look like proper monsters. That’s how F1 should be – very extreme.”

Rosberg hopes this may push drivers over the limit to where some races could be won or lost on fatigue.

“With those cars, the drivers need to be gladiators out there. That’s how it should be. They’ll take them to the limit physically,” Rosberg said.

Even now, they’re hurting bad, all of them. That’s great to hear. It should take the drivers physically to their absolute limits. Maybe we’ll see a race where someone will lose a win because they’re just knackered. That would be exciting.”

A natural question you wonder is, would Rosberg want to be out there? After being back at a track, Rosberg felt content and solid with his decision to step back after his proverbial “mic drop” moment.

“For me there was not one single moment where I thought, ‘Damn, I should be sitting in that car,'” Rosberg said. “It was interesting and perfect to realize that.

“I think that’s it! It’s awesome … the vibe is so exciting. All the journalists are out of control with new cars, who’s gonna be fastest, it’s such hype at the moment. (There’s) big hope and big optimism the sport can become even better.”

Here’s what Rosberg posted on Twitter today: