road america

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IMSA: Road America post-weekend notebook

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Some final thoughts on the IMSA weekend from Road America, the Continental Tire Road Race Showcase, are below:

FINALLY, A NON-CADILLAC WIN

The early rate of development, mileage and performance from the Cadillac DPi-V.Rs in September last year gave them a distinct advantage in the early races this year. By contrast, the Mazda RT24-P didn’t roll out publicly until November and Tequila Patron ESM’s Nissan Onroak DPi didn’t break cover until barely before Christmas. The several month lead-time the Cadillac had meant it was always a better sorted package out of the gate.

However, the other Daytona Prototype international (DPi) manufacturers are catching things up. Testing for what will likely be a revised Mazda – at least within the box and framework of the regulations – will start soon in Joest Racing’s hands, hence why they’ve withdrawn from the final few races. The Nissan, meanwhile took on an electronics update prior to Road America this weekend. A more reliable package followed and the car, with its GT3 engine taken from the Nissan GT-R NISMO GT3, delivered a “Patron perfect” finish in the race with first and third.

Photo courtesy of IMSA

Pipo Derani remains fast as ever when the car’s right and seized his opportunity Sunday, taking over from the consummate professional Johannes van Overbeek who’d put the No. 22 car in that close-to-the-lead position with his opening stint.

Cadillac couldn’t run the table this year and with the race on to be the first non-Cadillac winner, it was Patron and ESM that prevailed.

With the two Nissan Onroak DPis in first and third and the No. 90 VISIT FLORIDA Racing Ligier JS P217 in fifth, it was a great day for Onroak Automotive on Sunday.

CONTINENTAL RACE WAS CAUGHT BETWEEN ROCK AND A HARD PLACE

Some races just don’t go according to plan and the Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge two-hour race on Saturday was a perfect example of that through a combination of factors.

Taking it from the start, a local 4:30 p.m. CT green flag time meant an already later start to the day, and followed the Lamborghini Super Trofeo North America race which preceded it. Usually, the Lamborghini race comes at the end of the day with the Continental race taking place immediately after IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship qualifying. That wasn’t the case here. With rain coming later in the day, that start time then has a knock-on effect that you’ll be closer to darkness by end of day (yes, it wasn’t going to be night at 6:30 p.m. but it would certainly be moving into night).

Photo courtesy of IMSA

Secondly there’s the issue of lap length at Road America, at a season-long 4.048 miles. When a full-course caution is displayed, it slows an already long lap optimal time at around 2 minutes, 25 seconds under green flag conditions to almost 4 minutes per lap. Conservatively, at a 2 minute, 30 second lap average with no yellows, a two-hour race would only deliver 48 total laps at this track.

Once the second caution flew at just past the one-hour mark, with a red flag following shortly thereafter for lightning in the area, then heavy rain, it was always going to be doubtful to get a restart in purely down to the available time left. The red flag was displayed with 40 minutes left, and the race clock still ran. That meant there was realistically only about a 15-minute window to ensure lightning was out of the area for long enough, and that the field could restart with time to complete the full yellow flag procedure to make pit stops, change drivers and complete the yellow, and you might have had five to eight minutes for a restart – good for two, maybe three laps of green flag running without any further yellows.

The considerations and health/well-being of the fans, competitors, corner workers, camera crew, and photographers all around the course also needed to be noted.

Ultimately the clock ran out on such an opportunity and with the weather doing what it was, IMSA was stuck in a position where calling the race early was the only viable option given the extenuating circumstances. IMSA’s full statement on the race’s early conclusion is linked here, and below.

As for the ST class cars that ultimately finished in the top four positions? You can’t fault them for their strategy plays, by running long enough in the opening stint to move to the front, get track position, and wait to switch to their second drivers. That they benefited from the early end to the race was payoff for their gamble. Had the race been restarted, it’s likely they would have dropped further down the order. As they say, that’s racing, and what this did at least do was open up a running joke among many ST drivers to ask, “how many total laps did you get this weekend?”

The win was particularly special for Chad McCumbee, who wound up driving the entire race in the No. 25 Freedom Autosport Mazda MX-5 he shares with Stevan McAleer, and was racing with a heavy heart after losing a close friend last week.

CORVETTE’S NO. 3 CAR SOMEHOW KEEPS GTLM POINTS LEAD

Photo courtesy of IMSA

Corvette Racing’s reward for winning early races in recent years seems to be falling further down the perceived Balance of Performance “pecking order” for the rest of the year. And it then falls to their drivers to keep their nose clean and make something out of nothing to ensure the early season success doesn’t get washed away as other cars rise to the surface.

Any of BMW, Ford or Porsche has had the measure of Corvette on outright pace in the last several GTLM races – Corvette not having won since Circuit of The Americas in May. Despite all that, Antonio Garcia and Jan Magnussen still lead the points, and actually increased the gap from seven over BMW’s Bill Auberlen and Alexander Sims to eight over Road America winners Dirk Mueller and Joey Hand of Ford this weekend.

Sims, whose No. 25 BMW fell back early in the race with a suspension issue, inadvertently helped the No. 3 Corvette car gain more points after tapping the sister No. 4 Corvette, which has had a luckless campaign, into a spin at Turn 3 near the finish.

Garcia and Magnussen held off Mueller, incidentally, for the 2013 American Le Mans Series GT title in the last year with the old Corvette C6.R through a combination of guile and determination, not outright pace. It might be a case of history repeating itself if they do so again in 2017.

PERFORMANCE TECH SEALS PC CROWN, NOW SEEKS PERFECTION

Photo courtesy of IMSA

Another race, another win for Performance Tech Motorsports, and this one sealed the driver’s championship for James French and Pato O’Ward a race early. Not that it was really in doubt, but stranger things had happened.

French finally has a professional win at his home track, after the hundreds of thousands of miles the Sheboygan native has logged here. O’Ward received a welcome entry into victory lane after his Pro Mazda season began to unravel here last year, when teammate Aaron Telitz delivered a perfect weekend.

It’s been an odd year because the team’s executed flawlessly all year but hasn’t had the level of competition the PC class has had before. It shouldn’t detract from their efforts though, and that was something O’Ward was keen to emphasize Sunday.

“The problem has been this year there’s not many cars, so yeah we’re winning, but there’s only three cars. I wish there was more competition. But all the times set last year and the year before, we shattered all those,” said the talented teenaged Mexican driver, who has adjusted well to his first season in sports cars. “I feel it would be more fun with more cars and competition; but we’ve maximized everything we have.”

A win with third driver Kyle Masson at the Motul Petit Le Mans in October would complete the team’s perfect season of winning all eight races in the category’s sign-off.

VARIOUS GTD NOTES

Photo courtesy of IMSA

There wasn’t really a dominant theme in GT Daytona this weekend so here’s some quick thoughts about the most populous class in the field:

  • Top six in GTD, manufacturers: BMW, Porsche, Audi, Mercedes-AMG, Ferrari, Lamborghini. Can’t get the balance across the eight manufacturers in class much better than that.
  • A roller-coaster year with a rotating driver lineup is never something you want but it’s something Turner Motorsport has had this year. Having two factory affiliated drivers in what’s meant to be a pro-am class doesn’t hurt though, and Jens Klingmann and Road America newcomer Jesse Krohn did both BMW and themselves no harm with a flawless weekend in the team’s No. 96 M6 GT3.
  • Seeing “Dyson” on a Porsche GT car forces one to do a double take – you’re wondering where Dyson Racing and its fleet of sports car legends are – but the No. 73 Park Place Motorsports Porsche 911 GT3 R car lived up to the name of the legendary team with the vacuum cleaner sponsor on board, and Joerg Bergmeister and Patrick Lindsey coming home second, one spot ahead of the lone Audi in the field from Stevenson Motorsports.
  • Consistency keeps fueling the No. 63 Scuderia Corsa Ferrari 488 GT3’s championship lead – another workmanlike fifth place from Christina Nielsen and Alessandro Balzan extended their run of top-six finishes to eight in a row, all without a win. Closest title rivals in the No. 33 Riley Motorsports-Team AMG Mercedes AMG-GT3 finally ended a rough four-race patch of results with fourth.
  • After a weekend dominated by controversy and rumors, Paul Miller Racing pressed on after its post-qualifying penalty assessed to finish sixth in class with Madison Snow and Bryan Sellers in the team’s No. 48 Lamborghini Huracán GT3.
  • CORE autosport posted its best 2017 result, seventh, with Colin Braun and Jon Bennett in the No. 54 Porsche 911 GT3 R. The team hasn’t forgotten how to win, but the adaptation for driver and team into GTD has proven one of the year’s biggest tough surprises.
  • In its first race back with Porsche, the No. 50 WeatherTech entry of Cooper MacNeil and Gunnar Jeannette was ninth in class, third among four GTD Porsches and behind the No. 33 Riley Mercedes-AMG it had shared a tent with all races except here this year.
  • Lexus again failed to convert impressive qualifying pace into a result, ending eighth and 10th with a switched-up driver lineup. At least it was a better weekend for them than Acura, who switched up its liveries and then wrote off one of its two cars.

OTHER NOTES FROM THE WEEKEND

  • Your overall winners from the weekend in Porsche GT3 Cup Challenge USA by Yokohama were Kelly-Moss Road and Race Jake Eidson (Friday’s Watkins Glen Race 1 makeup race), then Moorespeed’s Corey Fergus in both Saturday and Sunday’s Road America scheduled races. Eidson still leads Fergus, 191-157, in points with three weekends remaining.
  • Another banner weekend for Jeff Mosing occurred in the GT3 Platinum Masters’ class; the likable Texan won his class both days (Sunday’s in a final lap, up the hill pass for the win), and added a third in the Continental Tire Challenge race Saturday where he drove all race to extend his and Eric Foss’ points lead.
  • Prestige Performance’s Trent Hindman and Riccardo Agostini swept both Lamborghini Super Trofeo North America races overall, building their winning streak to three straight races overall.
  • Of note, Shea Holbrook and Pippa Mann finished fourth in their class (Am) in both Saturday and Sunday’s Lamborghini races, and one spot higher overall on Sunday than on Saturday. Facing bad weather, limited track time and limited car experience, Mann describes how the friends got on as teammates this weekend in her most recent Sportscar365 blog.
  • Risi Competizione has announced its return to action starting with the next round at VIRginia International Raceway. It’ll be nice to see that Ferrari 488 GTE with Giancarlo Fisichella and Toni Vilander back on the grid.
  • Top gesture of the weekend goes to Porsche GT Team for having the team sign a bonnet for outgoing Porsche Motorsport North America President Jens Walther, who served in his last race in this role this weekend. Dr. Daniel Armbruster takes over the role from Sept. 1, while Walther will become the new Director of Sales and Marketing for Porsche Leipzig.

IMSA is off until VIRginia International Raceway at the end of this month, for a GT-only weekend. However, both the IMSA Prototype Challenge Presented by Mazda and Ultra 94 Porsche GT3 Cup Challenge Canada by Yokohama series race in Canada this weekend on the streets of Trois-Rivieres.

IMSA: 2017 Midseason Update with Scott Atherton

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While technically the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship is past the “midseason” point, Road America traditionally serves as the site of the sanctioning body’s round of updates on the year passed and the year ahead.

IMSA President Scott Atherton generally plays off the weather to make a number of jokes at the presentation after the formal words. While last year’s sun-drenched presentation prompted an Atherton “the future’s so bright, we need to wear shades” line, this year witnessed quite the opposite weather-wise. Rare rainy, cloudy and overcast conditions meant a last-minute shift of the presentation from Road America’s victory lane into the Tufte Center conference room, thanks to some quick work from the IMSA staff with the track.

It was against that backdrop though that Atherton’s 2016 words about the future actually shone through the miserable weather conditions, because IMSA has one hell of an opportunity at the moment, and stands at the precipice of even greater things as it’s preparing for 2018 – what will already be the fifth season of the combined series between the former GRAND-AM Rolex Series and American Le Mans Series.

Photo courtesy of IMSA

In the last month, Team Penske and Acura and Joest Racing and Mazda have formally confirmed their Daytona Prototype international (DPi) programs, the burgeoning JDC-Miller Motorsports team has announced a second car, other teams from other series are candidly expressing interest in the series, TCR is coming into the Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge ranks, there’s been recent partnership extension announcements (BUBBA burger and VP Fuels), and IMSA announced what will be a popular return to the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course.

Has Atherton and for that matter IMSA – in this current form – previously had as good a month in terms of overall, big picture announcements?

“To be really brief in a response, no,” Atherton told NBC Sports at Road America. “As I alluded to, there is so much momentum now. We as a group believe what we’re experiencing now is a result of efforts made by an army of people for the last four years. It looks like it’s all come at once; but it’s been a long process.

“I’ve had the pleasure of working with Ralf (Juttner) in the American Le Mans Series with Audi and its prototypes, so we want to welcome them back to our paddock.

“Of course now we can be candid; (the Penske Acura news) was one of the worst kept secrets. It’s now out and open. Everyone is very enthusiastic. The early reports are that the car turned its first wheels. Calling this a ‘game changer’ is accurate, with the Penske organization coming back in.”

Ironically, the fact most of the news trickled out before the annual schedule presentation meant there wasn’t as much new news revealed to those key stakeholders on site at Road America.

Not that that’s a bad thing, but in “Atherton speak”, the fact of the matter is that the “soufflé hasn’t risen all the way yet,” with other potential changes to get revealed later this year.

“I’d say yes and no about this being one of our better presentations,” Atherton admitted. “The reason for the yes part is that it’s always great to stand up to confirm a wonderful schedule for the WeatherTech Championship and several other platforms.

“Alas, what is frustrating is that our real news here – Mid-Ohio – was announced a week ago. Some of the other examples that I’ve hinted about are not quite ready. From a news factor, I think we’re probably there’s been other years with bigger news. But factoring in Mazda Joest, Penske Acura, Mid-Ohio, and all those others in 30 days, it’s never been that good.”

Mid-Ohio’s addition has been a hit, Atherton saying on that front, “As expected it is all positive. It’s rare we can make an announcement that’s received that way. There’s always someone with an agenda for the other direction; but if it exists, we’re not aware of it.”

Photo courtesy of IMSA

The decision to take Long Beach off the WeatherTech Championship calendar for the GT Daytona class is the one schedule bit of consternation in the paddock. From several discussions with GTD teams at the Road America weekend, it was suggested that this was a major market loss for the class, and the cost savings for doing 11 races versus 12 races aren’t as pronounced as it may seem.

Atherton cited multiple factors as the reason for the drop, but it’s worth noting the IMSA paddock was close to capacity at Long Beach this year with the GTD addition for the first time.

“It was a combination of reasons; I would say primarily, it was from feedback from our GTD stakeholders,” Atherton said. “There’s the budgetary implications of another event – this was one race added for this year. There’s the potential for significant crash damage in a street circuit environment. So there are many factors taken into it.

“There are people on both sides of this equation, and yes, this does makes a lot of sense for brands and OEMs. But at the end of the day, it’s GTD stakeholders who made the ultimate decision.”

This removes, for 2018, seeing the Continental Tire-shod GTD cars racing on the same streets as the Pirelli World Challenge GT cars, which have not formally confirmed their 2018 schedule but are expected to return to Long Beach.

IMSA, as a unit, is managing relationships with several other racing organizations. In PWC’s case, Atherton and WC Vision President/CEO Greg Gill are working with each other to ensure no domestic conflicts to allow drivers interested in driving in both series to do so without sacrificing one championship or another, as has been the case this year for the betterment of a number of drivers in both paddocks (PWC’s midseason report is linked here). It also maintains a healthy relationship with INDYCAR; IMSA’s races on the Long Beach and Detroit weekends continue with other IMSA-sanctioned championships competing at Barber and Sonoma.

The DPis have been an unquestioned success. Photo courtesy of IMSA

On an international front, IMSA won’t admit it publicly, but they’ve indeed positioned themselves better for the future with the DPi formula allowing manufacturer identity at the fraction of the cost of LMP1 hybrid, which has lost Nissan, Audi and now Porsche within a three-year period – and leaves only Toyota within the top class of the FIA World Endurance Championship for 2018.

IMSA has also now entered into a relationship with TCR, with that class of cars set to be introduced speed-wise between the GS and ST classes in the 2018 Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge, and then set to be the second class only in 2019 with the ST class expected to be phased out.

Quite how IMSA positions itself within the overall global sports car landscape is a full-time job on its own but Atherton hailed the staff that’s allowed these relationships to develop and grow.

“Well, it’s a full-time job and then some; we have some really good people,” Atherton said. “Simon Hodgson and his crew on the technical and competition side, they’ll travel to several meetings in Europe with the FIA and TCR.

“Meanwhile we’re in constant communication with the ACO; it goes back so far, we’re very comfortable with each other. There’s no issues.

“Bringing in a new platform – TCR – is always a challenging undertaking. With Simon at the helm, no one is concerned. It’ll take some time and effort, so it’ll be good.”

Photo courtesy of IMSA

TCR interest appears to be on the rise with Karl Thomson’s C360R team having announced at the weekend the purchase of two Audi RS 3s, with more teams set to announce their plans in the coming weeks.

For the WeatherTech Championship itself, one of the issues it may face in 2018 is related to another recently announced incentive – the “36 Hours of Florida” meant to attract international teams.

We don’t yet know the state of the WeatherTech Championship grid next year but if the Acura and Lexus GTD programs evolve as they shift away from full factory programs, and we figure the full-season Prototype grid will increase with the aforementioned additions and the potential step-up of Prototype Challenge teams, you wonder how much room will exist if a bevy of international teams arrive.

This year, Rebellion Racing and DragonSpeed were in Prototype while the GTD field added a number of international entries, including the factory Aston Martin team and ADAC GT Masters-winning Montaplast by Land-Motorsport Audi team.

Photo courtesy of IMSA

If such a situation arises where the car count exceeds the potential maximum grid, Atherton expects preference to be given to full-time IMSA entrants.

“We’ve faced that before. With the first year of the merger, running combined in ’14 we were oversubscribed, so we have some experience in how to manage it.

“We don’t have, I won’t call it a ‘pecking order,’ but there is a criteria that full-season teams with a full-season commitment to us, and those running for a championship are given greater consideration than those that might be only doing one or two races.

“Right now, we’re not concerned. Based on some of the reports we’re seeing out of Europe and the level of interest especially for Daytona and Sebring seems at a very high level.”

How does IMSA go forward from here? After a month of banner, positive news for the overall health of the championship, the key is getting that excitement to penetrate a greater market share beyond the hardcore sports car fans and stakeholders in the paddock. Atherton noted a number of increased metrics though across IMSA’s social media and web platforms at the start of his formal presentation.

“We couldn’t be more pleased. The best part is we’re not done,” he said.

Ganassi completes Road America IndyCar, IMSA sweep

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ELKHART LAKE, Wis. – Chip Ganassi Racing has managed success across most of its teams in the 2017 season, regardless of which series it competes in.

Today the team now completed a sweep of the Verizon IndyCar Series and IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship races at Road America, following its win in the GT Le Mans class in Sunday’s Continental Tire Road Race Showcase.

Joey Hand and Dirk Mueller converted Mueller’s pole position into the No. 66 Ford GT’s second win of the season (Rolex 24 at Daytona). And after Scott Dixon won the IndyCar race here a little over a month ago, it means Ganassi has now conquered the track with both its teams this year.

They’ll have a chance to go for a three-peat later this month in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, when Justin Marks drives the No. 42 Katerra Chevrolet here. Marks won last year at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Xfinity and will race for the team there next week.

Additionally, Ford is the sixth different manufacturer in GTLM to win in as many years at Road America. Ford follows Corvette who won last year, then Porsche in 2015, Risi Ferrari in 2014, the SRT Viper in 2013 and BMW in 2012.

Hand had the opportunity to finish today’s race, with Mueller having started from pole. That left Mueller in a position of watching Hand bring the car home, unlike where Hand was at last year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans and Daytona this year.

Hand reflected on the final hour, needing to hold off Laurens Vanthoor in the No. 912 Porsche 911 RSR, for the victory.

“I love racing. That’s what I show up for. If people on TV and here didn’t enjoy that race, they probably don’t like racing,” Hand said.

“This team is historically good here. Dirk threw down in the Kink – we’ll call it ‘#SoFlat’ – so it was a big lap and that started it all off. Managing this race from the front is what you need to do. There were a bunch of good teams and cars. You don’t want to get caught out.

“After a few bad races, coming to the championship, this is what we needed.”

Neither the No. 3 Corvette C7.R nor No. 25 BMW Team RLL BMW M6 GTLM had a banner day – the top two cars in points finished fourth and sixth – so it gives the Ganassi No. 66 car a great points day.

The sister No. 67 Ford Chip Ganassi Racing Ford GT of Richard Westbrook and Ryan Briscoe finished third, for its fourth podium of the season – all of which have been achieved in the last six races. This also marks the team’s first double podium finish of the season, coming after a front row lockout in qualifying.

Simpson, JDC-Miller rue lost win chance at Road America

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ELKHART LAKE, Wis. – The No. 22 Tequila Patron ESM Nissan Onroak DPi won the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship unofficial “Which Prototype topples Cadillac sweepstakes” in Sunday’s Continental Tire Road Race Showcase.

But it was the car that’s been the most consistent challenger to the Cadillacs – the No. 85 JDC-Miller Motorsports Oreca 07 Gibson – which was perhaps in with the best chance to win today but fell victim to a strategic misstep, that didn’t look bad at the time.

Misha Goikhberg started eighth and last in the Prototype field but even so, that wasn’t the worst case scenario because both he and Stephen Simpson had nowhere to go but up afterwards, and they knew they had better race pace.

Goikhberg enjoyed a couple intense battles in his stint, and then Simpson was up to fourth with just under an hour remaining in the race and the question was how they could move even further forward from there.

The caution flew once John Edwards stopped at pit in in his No. 24 BMW Team RLL BMW M6 GTLM, and that presented a tough place for the Prototype field at that time.

With most cars unable to run much longer than 40 minutes on a single tank of fuel, but with 55 minutes and change left in the race, the JDC-Miller team gambled that staying out then could pay dividends – but it would only work if the race would stay green from there after the restart.

Simpson restarted in the lead on Lap 55, with just under 40 minutes left to go, and seeing this strategy play out against the other six Prototypes that pitted under the caution would have been fascinating.

It never got the chance to materialize though as contact between the No. 3 Corvette C7.R of Antonio Garcia and the No. 911 Porsche 911 RSR of Dirk Werner saw Werner get beached in Turn 1 after getting sent off course. And it also doomed Simpson’s hopes because he’d need to pit on this caution and lose all the track position.

Following a stop for emergency service and a second, later stop for full service, Simpson and Goikhberg dropped back to eighth overall and in class, for their worst finish of the season. Until Road America, the team finished between second and sixth each race – which placed the pairing third in points.

Simpson was left to rue the tough call in the immediate aftermath of the race, but still praised the team for making it because under green conditions, it could have played out in their favor.

“The rationale behind it made sense. But obviously we need to revisit it and learn from it,” Simpson told NBC Sports. “It’s not that it was a silly decision. It just didn’t fall our way.”

Before he did pit, Simpson enjoyed a great battle with eventual winner Pipo Derani in the Nissan, even though it wasn’t a real battle for position knowing the pit stop was imminent. Simpson praised Derani’s race craft, and Derani did the same afterwards.

“Before the weekend even started, I had a bug in my stomach, extra determination to succeed,” Simpson said. “Even after qualifying I didn’t worry. I believe I can out race all these guys. I planned on doing it today and the next two races as well.

“I’m not sure who I was racing in the Nissan, but I have tons of respect for him. It was fun to race up there. It was very good. It’s a pleasure competing with them. I’m disappointed we are not rewarded.”

Derani echoed those thoughts, while also not sure when Simpson would need to pit.

“I knew he had to make a pit stop. My engineer advised me to play smart with him,” Derani said. “You never know. I tried to overtake him. Luckily he had to pit and we had the green laps in the end. It’s a tricky situation. We could see how aggressive he was driving. Didn’t want to put myself in a risky position. Luckily he pitted and we had clean air after that.”

Simpson regretted the day’s ending but said eventually if the performance keeps up, their day will come.

“That’s what makes this one disappointing. The JDC-Miller guys work extra hard. We need to convert these good opportunities into wins.”

IMSA: Derani, Patron ESM Nissan dethrone Cadillac at Road America

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ELKHART LAKE, Wis. – For the first time in the 2017 IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship season, it’s not a Cadillac DPi-V.R that has won overall, as the second different Daytona Prototype international (DPi) manufacturer has broken through.

Pipo Derani and Johannes van Overbeek have pulled off the win in the No. 22 Tequila Patron ESM Nissan Onroak DPi in Sunday’s Continental Tire Road Race Showcase at Road America.

The Nissan has toppled the Cadillac, courtesy of Derani’s barnstorming pass on Lap 56 around the outside of Jordan Taylor in the No. 10 Konica Minolta Cadillac on a restart into Turn 1. The No. 10 car won the first five races and Action Express Racing, with its Nos. 5 and 31 cars, have won the last two for Cadillac to open the year seven-for-seven in Prototype.

Derani, who’s been a thorn in the Wayne Taylor Racing team’s side before (notably at the 2016 Rolex 24 at Daytona), took over from Johannes van Overbeek and was only fractionally behind him after their last round of pit stops – stops which indirectly decided the race.

At that pit cycle, the No. 85 JDC-Miller Motorsports Oreca 07 Gibson opted not to pit, perhaps hoping the rest of the Prototype class field would need to come in again for a splash of fuel – so it shifted Stephen Simpson to the lead.

But the strategic hopes were dashed once the No. 3 Corvette C7.R contacted the No. 911 Porsche 911 RSR going into Turn 1, which knocked Dirk Werner deep into the gravel trap and brought out another full course caution barely a lap after the last one.

Simpson would eventually need to pit, first taking on emergency service in a closed pit and then pitting again after the next restart for full service. That dropped the plucky “JDC Banana Boat” down to a season-worst eighth and last place in class, after a run that did not match its pace as Simpson set the fastest lap of the race at 1:54.095.

Performance Tech Motorsports kept up its streak in Prototype Challenge, a seventh consecutive victory in the swan song year for the class. This one, though, was harder earned than most as the No. 26 BAR1 Motorsports car got back to the lead lap and within a few seconds of Performance Tech in the final half hour, but still Pato O’Ward and polesitter James French forged ahead to ensure French finally has a professional win not far from his hometown of Sheboygan in the No. 38 Oreca FLM09.

In GT Le Mans, Ford Chip Ganassi Racing finally won with its Ford GT for the first time since this year’s Rolex 24 at Daytona and in the process, became the sixth different manufacturer in as many years to do so at this race in class. Corvette won last year, Porsche in 2015, Risi Ferrari in 2014, the SRT Viper in 2013 and BMW in 2012. Joey Hand and Dirk Mueller pulled off the triumph in the No. 66 car.

Meanwhile in GT Daytona, the No. 96 Turner Motorsport BMW M6 GT3 got on the board with Jens Klingmann and Jesse Krohn delivering a dominant drive.

More to follow…