Scott Dixon

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Dixon’s victory bolsters championship lead

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One of the dominant storylines entering Sunday’s Kohler Grand Prix at Road America was that championship leader Scott Dixon was not among the seven different race winners during the first half of the Verizon IndyCar Series season.

However, the Chip Ganassi Racing driver flipped that storyline on its head with impressive run to victory at Road America, his first at the 4.048-mile road course and his first of the 2017 season, bringing the total number of races winners in 2017 to eight.

It also sees him add to his championship lead, although the title fight remains incredibly close. Dixon now sits on 379 points, 34 ahead of second-place Simon Pagenaud. Helio Castroneves sits third on 342 points. Takuma Sato (323) and Josef Newgarden (318) complete the top five, while Will Power (sixth, with 316 points) and Graham Rahal (seventh, with 302 points), remain well within striking distance of the championship lead.

Assuming that 21 cars will fill out the remainder of the 2017 events, the maximum point swing in a race is 45. (Note: Harding Racing will return at Pocono Raceway for the ABC Supply 500. With 22 cars in the field that weekend, the maximum point swing will be 46).

With that in mind, Pagenaud and Castroneves could overtake Dixon at Iowa Speedway in two weeks (Iowa Corn 300, July 9 at 5:00 p.m. on NBCSN). And, while Sato, Newgarden, Power, and Rahal mathematically cannot leave Iowa in the championship lead, they could easily gain ground on Dixon.

Further, with double-points available at the season-ending GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma, the championship remains anyone’s for the taking.

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Dixon finally breaks through at Road America

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ELKHART LAKE, Wis. – After a year of near misses and frustration, Scott Dixon has finally captured his first win of the Verizon IndyCar Series season.

The driver of the No. 9 NTT Data Honda for Chip Ganassi Racing has won today’s KOHLER Grand Prix at Road America after leading 24 of 55 laps, and holding off a late charge from Josef Newgarden, best of Team Penske’s quartet.

The win also provides Mike Hull a victory on his 25-year anniversary with the team, a special moment for the entire organization. Dixon is now the eighth winner of the year, and the victory comes at the only active track where Dixon hadn’t led a lap – until today. It’s his 41st win of his career and extends the number of years he’s won a race to 13 straight years, dating back to 2005.

Hull made an excellent strategic decision to go with Firestone’s red alternate tires on the second-to-last stint. Following a restart after Takuma Sato spun at the Kink, Dixon then made a spectacular move to Newgarden’s outside going into Turn 1, and completing the move on exit. Newgarden had no counter as he was on Firestone’s blacks at that point.

Newgarden led home teammates Helio Castroneves, who fell to third from the pole, Simon Pagenaud and Will Power, as Penske ended second, third, fourth and fifth after sweeping the top four spots on the grid.

Charlie Kimball parlayed an off-sequence strategy to jump up to sixth, with Ed Jones, Graham Rahal, Max Chilton and Mikhail Aleshin completing the top 10.

Tony Kanaan had a heavy accident at the Kink but got out of his car, in the race’s one major incident.

More to follow…

Scott Dixon makes young IndyCar fan’s day (VIDEO)

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After his significant accident in the 101st Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil, Scott Dixon was almost more frustrated with the fact his Chip Ganassi Racing team would have to build up a new chassis to replace his one that flew several hundred feet after catapulting over Jay Howard.

But a young fan named Lucy put the accident into its proper perspective, as was discovered by Advance Auto Parts IndyCar Radio Network’s Jake Query in IndyCar’s fan mail.

Query got together with the IndyCar PR team and Dixon to eventually make Lucy’s dream come true, as she got to meet her favorite driver in the Verizon IndyCar Series.

The full story from IndyCar.com is linked here; the full video is linked here.

This was highlighted during Thursday’s NASCAR AMERICA show on NBCSN, which you can see above. You can see Verizon IndyCar Series’ KOHLER Grand Prix coverage from Road America live, Sunday on NBCSN at 12:30 p.m. ET.

Bell podiums, Ford Ganassi IndyCar stars end midpack at Le Mans

Photo: Scuderia Corsa
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The 85th running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans proved to be a challenging race for representatives from the Verizon IndyCar Series. However, one did finish on the podium in his class, while all four of them saw the checkered flag at the end.

The best finishing in class was NBCSN IndyCar analyst Townsend Bell, who finished on the podium in the GTE Am class in the No. 62 WeatherTech-backed Ferrari 488 GTE for Scuderia Corsa.

With co-drivers Cooper MacNeil and Bill Sweedler, the trio managed to avoid a lot of the chaos that surrounded this year’s Le Mans to emerge third in class (30th overall), with the car never having significant issues at any point during the 24-hour endurance race.

Of note: this marks the third consecutive class podium for Bell and Sweedler, who also won last year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans in the GTE Am class, while MacNeil scored his first ever podium at the endurance classic.

“Wow, what a race,” Bell said. “I spent a lot of time in the car over the 24 hours. The car was nearly as good at the end as it was when I started it. Thanks to WeatherTech for being with us this weekend and to the whole Scuderia Corsa crew and the team from Kessel. We had a great combination of drivers and support here all week.”

Sweedler added, “It is magical to get here again and do well. Three runs here and three podiums, two third place finishes and a win is incredible. The WeatherTech Racing Ferrari was incredible. The Scuderia Corsa team did a great job. Townsend did monster stints and Cooper did a great job as well. What a day!”

Of his maiden Le Mans podium, MacNeil said, “We ran a really clean race. We only had a couple of minor issues all race. I ran clean and didn’t put a wheel wrong all and that is how you have to run here at Le Mans. We gave it all we had. We ran to plan, did the stops and driver changes and ran our race. We kept it clean and the great work from the Scuderia Corsa and Kessel guys got us up on the podium. The WeatherTech Racing Ferrari ran great the entire 24 hours.”

Ford Chip Ganassi Racing saw two of its IndyCar stars make the trip over, with Tony Kanaan taking Sebastien Bourdais’ place in the No. 68 driver lineup, joining defending GTE Pro winners Joey Hand and Dirk Mueller, while Scott Dixon partnered Richard Westbrook and Ryan Briscoe in the No. 69.

Photo: Ford Performance

With GTE Pro proving the most intense of the four classes, the Ford GTs stayed in contention for much of the race, but ultimately faded at the end despite finishing on the same lap as the winning No. 97 Aston Martin Racing Vantage V8.

Kanaan managed to finish sixth in class (23rd overall), with Dixon right behind him (seventh in class, 24th overall).

Photo: Ford Performance

Mueller described the race, and Kanaan’s debut, for the No. 68 entry: “Congratulations to the No. 67 crew for a fantastic second-place finish,” Müller said. “We know how it feels to make it on to the podium. It’s a good feeling. We were hit with so many things during the race. Joey did a good job and definitely Tony Kanaan. (Adding him to the lineup) was such a rush. We arrived here on Tuesday morning and from that moment on it all went so fast. He gave everything for us and we made a good team.”

In the prototype ranks, Mikhail Aleshin joined Sergey Sirotkin and Viktor Shaytar in the No. 37 Dallara P217 Gibson for SMP Racing. After suffering mechanical problems, the no. 37 car could do no better than 17th in class (34th overall) after falling 36 laps behind the winning No. 38 Jackie Chan DC Racing Oreca 07 Gibson. However, Aleshin, Sirotkin, and Shaytar did complete the 24-hour distance, despite their problems.

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Bell leads IndyCar contingent in Le Mans qualifying

Photo: Scuderia Corsa
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Although he hasn’t been in a Verizon IndyCar Series race this year, NBCSN IndyCar analyst Townsend Bell was best of those actively involved in the 2017 IndyCar season in qualifying for Saturday’s 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Bell qualified third in the GTE-Am class in the No. 62 WeatherTech-backed Ferrari 488 GTE for Scuderia Corsa, which he shares with Bill Sweedler and Cooper MacNeil. Bell and Sweedler are seeking to defend their class victory here last year, which they accomplished co-driving with Jeff Segal in the previous generation Ferrari F458 Italia.

As there are eight 488s in the 16-car GTE-Am class, this Scuderia Corsa Ferrari has been the best of them both at the Le Mans Test Day and in qualifying. Bell’s best time of 3:53.312 was about a half second off class polesitter Fernando Rees, in the No. 50 Larbre Competition Corvette C7.R, at 3:52.886. Bell has completed 32 laps this week.

“Qualifying went well,” Bell said. “We made our first change to the car to make it go quicker and that is exactly what it did tonight. It improved the balance and that made a small improvement, but around this long track that makes a big difference. Bill and Cooper did some strong laps and are comfortable in the car, which is what is important. To be starting third and the fastest Ferrari says a lot about our effort here this week.”

Beyond Bell, there’s three active drivers competing in IndyCar this season who are racing at Le Mans this week, two in the GTE-Pro class and one in LMP2.

Scott Dixon is best of that group as he’ll start fifth in GTE-Pro in the No. 69 Ford Chip Ganassi Team USA Ford GT which he shares with Ryan Briscoe and Richard Westbrook. This trio finished third here last year, with Dixon setting the fastest race lap in class on his Le Mans debut.

Briscoe, an IndyCar veteran from 2005 through 2015, set the car’s best qualifying time of 3:51.232. The class pole time is Darren Turner in the No. 97 Aston Martin Vantage V8 at 3:50.837.

“We definitely had a go at qualifying tonight,” Briscoe said. “It was the first time we ran with new tires and low fuel and we’ve always found this car comes alive when we drop the fuel out of it, so it felt great. The balance was nice. We got one of those good laps at Le Mans where you get a tow and don’t get held up with any traffic and piece it together. I was really pleased, but obviously there’s a lot of competition. It was quick at the time but we’re fifth now so I think it’s going to be a tough race and hopefully we’ll have the pace to stay at the front during the race.”

Dixon’s best time this week in 29 total laps is a 3:52.807, set in the second of three qualifying sessions. Westbrook’s is a 3:52.496. Dixon also got to catch up with Ford World Rallycross driver Ken Block at Le Mans.

The No. 68 Ford, the defending class winner here, will launch its defense from 12th on the 13-car grid. IndyCar 20th year man but Le Mans rookie Tony Kanaan shares that car with Joey Hand and Dirk Mueller, Kanaan deputizing for the injured Sebastien Bourdais.

Kanaan’s best lap this week is a 3:53.512. The Brazilian completed 15 laps in the first four-hour free practice session and nine more laps since, so he has a total of 24 before warmup on Saturday morning.

Mikhail Aleshin also saddles up for his third consecutive Le Mans, this time in SMP Racing’s new Dallara P217 Gibson in LMP2 with Sergey Sirotkin and Victor Shaitar.

Aleshin’s best time of 3:27.782 has put the No. 27 car 10th on the LMP2 class grid, and 16th overall, first non-Oreca 07 (or the rebadged Alpine A470 variant) on the grid. In the all-Russian lineup, the Schmidt Peterson Motorsports IndyCar driver has driven only 24 laps this week.

MAZDA ROAD TO INDY ROOKIE QUARTET DEBUTS

There’s also four recent Mazda Road to Indy presented by Cooper Tires graduates making their debuts at Le Mans, in Andre Negrao, Felix Rosenqvist, Will Owen and Jose Gutierrez, who’ve competed in either Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires or Pro Mazda Championship Presented by Cooper Tires in recent years.

Those cars will line up 14th, 20th, 21st and 22nd overall, eighth, 14th, 15th and 16th in the LMP2 class. Negrao is in the No. 35 Signatech Alpine A470 Gibson with Nelson Panciatici and Pierre Ragues, Gutierrez is in the DragonSpeed-run No. 22 Oreca 07 he shares with Ryo Hirakawa and Memo Rojas, Owen in the best of seven Ligier JS P217 chassis, the No. 32 United Autosports entry he shares with Filipe Albuquerque and Hugo de Sadeleer, and Rosenqvist in the DragonSpeed-10 Star No. 21 Oreca 07 with Henrik Hedman and Ben Hanley, an all-rookie lineup.

Negrao’s best time this week is 3:29.248 in 31 laps, Rosenqvist’s is 3:29.777 in just 19 laps, Gutierrez’s is 3:32.406 in 37 laps, and Owen’s is 3:37.469 in 32 laps.

It is worth noting the Oreca has a distinct pace edge in LMP2 over the other three chassis. Aleshin’s Dallara lap of 3:27.782 is the best non-Oreca lap this week, but still 2.43 seconds off Alex Lynn’s pole time of 3:25.352 in the No. 26 G-Drive Racing (TDS) Oreca 07.

Of course there are plenty of others with past IndyCar or Mazda Road to Indy experience in the field but these mentioned above are the most recent and/or are still active within these championships.

This year’s Le Mans race starts Saturday at 3 p.m. local time, 9 a.m. ET, with coverage on the FOX networks and flag-to-flag radio coverage via Radio Le Mans.