Michael Andretti already thinking about home win at Pocono

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The IZOD IndyCar Series won’t make its inaugural visit to the 2.5-mile Pocono Raceway until July, but that’s not stopping IndyCar team owner Michael Andretti from thinking about settling unfinished business at the “Tricky Triangle.”

“That’s one race I never won,” he told Chuck Curley of the Evening Sun of Hanover, Pennsylvania late last week. “It really ticks me off, to be honest with you. I should have won a couple of times, but I just had bad luck.”

The son of Mario made six starts at Pocono in his driving career, but was unable to take the checkered flag at the Pennsylvania oval. However, he’ll have four chances to finally earn a Pocono win this summer through his Andretti Autosport driving roster of reigning series champion Ryan Hunter-Reay, James Hinchcliffe, Marco Andretti and E.J. Viso.

With the quirky mile at Nazareth Speedway now returning to the Earth, Pocono represents the new home turf for the Andrettis — and as any athlete will tell you, there’s nothing better than a big win at home.

As for his team’s expansion to a four-car program with the addition of Viso, Andretti is hopeful that the move will pay off.

“I think, also adding E.J., we’re going to have another shot at winning races,” he also said to the Evening Sun. “He’s a guy that’s ready to break out. He’s shown he can be very quick, but hopefully in the right situation, he can really show what he has. We’re going to give him that.”

Last October’s announcement of the Pocono round was met with largely positive response and will revive the track’s past links to open-wheel racing. Pocono hosted USAC and CART events from 1971 to 1989, with winners in that run including legends such as A.J. Foyt, Rick Mears, Al Unser Sr., Mark Donahue and Johnny Rutherford.

Reviewing Danica Patrick’s highs and lows at Indianapolis Motor Speedway

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So much of Danica Patrick’s fame can be traced to Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

It’s where she became a household name 13 years ago when she became the first woman to lead the Indianapolis 500 and emerged as a transcendent athlete.

It’s where everything started. This Sunday, it’s where everything will end, too.

In her last warmup before starting the final race of her career, Patrick had a bumpy final practice Friday on Carb Day. She was eighth fastest, but her Dallara-Chevrolet was in the garage most of the session because of an electrical problem in the engine. After returning during the final 10 minutes of the session, Patrick’s No. 13 seemed to be OK.

“At the end of the day, these are things you’re actually glad for, because if this had happened Sunday, we would have been done,” she said. “I’m glad to get the issues out of the way early on. Overall, today felt good. We made some changes when I went out the second time, and I’m feeling good about starting seventh on Sunday.”
Though she has had her share of success – along with a fourth in her debut, there was a third in 2009 and six top 10s in seven starts — Patrick has learned well how to handle frustration at the 2.5-mile track, too.

Fuel mileage might have kept her from winning her debut, a pit collision ruined 2008, and an unstable setup made 2010 a wild ride.

For a review of her up-and-down history at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and her legacy in racing, watch the video essay above that ran during Friday’s NASCAR America Motorsports Special on NBCSN.