Does IndyCar need a juicy rivalry?

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We all love rivalries — Cowboys vs. Redskins, Celtics vs. Lakers, Yankees vs. Red Sox, etc. — and IZOD IndyCar Series fans would appreciate a legitimate one in their sport as well. But does such a thing exist for them right now?

As NASCAR can tell you, controversy sells. And while IndyCar maintains a loyal following for its action-packed races, it would appear to be lacking in the drama department.

Now, there have been incidents in recent years that have drawn attention. Perhaps the one that comes off the top of most race fans’ heads is Will Power’s double-bird salute to Race Control at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in 2011, a gesture that made sure the series’ one-and-done return to New England would always be remembered.

But those incidents never really evolved into something bigger. They happened, then came the initial attention that eventually died off, and then everyone involved kind of moved on. So does IndyCar need more “black hats” to create feuds that can yield longer-lasting buzz?

Perhaps. But here’s the question: How many in the paddock would relish being the bad guy?

“That’s the thing, it doesn’t sit well on just anybody’s shoulders,” Dario Franchitti told the Associated Press’ Jenna Fryer on Thursday. “[Paul Tracy] loved being the villain. I’ve been portrayed as the villain for some things I’ve done in races, but it’s not something I’m particularly comfortable with. Some guys love it, but it just doesn’t sit well with me.”

Graham Rahal, who got in a short feud with Marco Andretti after the two crashed last year at Long Beach, thinks that the sport’s management has an influence on why rivalries haven’t quite taken root within IndyCar — and that they could do their part to change that.

“Drama is part of it, but our sport in many ways tries to be too clean,” Rahal said to the AP. “Not from the driver side, but from [management and race control], because anytime you did anything, even if it was small, it was a penalty. We need to let some of that go.

“I don’t want it to get dangerous, but if we want to build drama for the sport, then they need to help.”

Reviewing Danica Patrick’s highs and lows at Indianapolis Motor Speedway

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So much of Danica Patrick’s fame can be traced to Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

It’s where she became a household name 13 years ago when she became the first woman to lead the Indianapolis 500 and emerged as a transcendent athlete.

It’s where everything started. This Sunday, it’s where everything will end, too.

In her last warmup before starting the final race of her career, Patrick had a bumpy final practice Friday on Carb Day. She was eighth fastest, but her Dallara-Chevrolet was in the garage most of the session because of an electrical problem in the engine. After returning during the final 10 minutes of the session, Patrick’s No. 13 seemed to be OK.

“At the end of the day, these are things you’re actually glad for, because if this had happened Sunday, we would have been done,” she said. “I’m glad to get the issues out of the way early on. Overall, today felt good. We made some changes when I went out the second time, and I’m feeling good about starting seventh on Sunday.”
Though she has had her share of success – along with a fourth in her debut, there was a third in 2009 and six top 10s in seven starts — Patrick has learned well how to handle frustration at the 2.5-mile track, too.

Fuel mileage might have kept her from winning her debut, a pit collision ruined 2008, and an unstable setup made 2010 a wild ride.

For a review of her up-and-down history at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and her legacy in racing, watch the video essay above that ran during Friday’s NASCAR America Motorsports Special on NBCSN.