Pirelli unsurprised by high tire wear in Malaysia

5 Comments

Pirelli’s F1 chief Paul Hembery has revealed that the high tire wear in Malaysia is what he was expecting, despite many teams querying the newly designed compounds.

In 2013, the tires have been designed to wear more aggressively, and this caught many of the teams out in Australia as they struggled towards the end of the race. Following practice, Sebastian Vettel questioned whether he would have enough sets of tires to complete the race on Sunday, but Hembery has dismissed this comment.

“Degradation stayed within our anticipated parameters. As we expected, we saw quite a high wear rate today, due to the more extreme nature of our 2013 tires – which put the accent firmly on performance – as well as the high temperatures and abrasive track surface.”

Hembery also acknowledged the differing wear rates between teams. This was particularly clear in Melbourne as Kimi Raikkonen managed to stop just twice, making his tires go the distance to finish ahead of his three-stopping rivals.

“We have also seen differences in the way that individual teams use the compounds, with the hard compound lasting 15 laps for some teams and 21 laps or more for others. We’ll be looking at all the data tonight to establish a more precise picture for qualifying and the race.”

The management of the Pirelli tires is quickly becoming pivotal in the battle for the early-season advantage, and questions still surround Raikkonen’s victory in Australia: was it due to raw pace or good tire management? Either way, if he can repeat the result in Malaysia, he will be in good shape to challenge for the championship. Should the forecast rain arrive in Malaysia though, the teams will have to wait until the Chinese Grand Prix in three weeks’ time before they truly understand the dry Pirelli compounds.

IndyCar: Being a father is most important to Will Power, not even Indy 500 win

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Even though he just won the biggest race in the world two weeks ago, there’s no question what is more important to Will Power: being a father or winning the Indianapolis 500.

“Being Beau’s father,” Power said of his 17-month-old son Beau.

Check out a special Father’s Day video by the elder Power and his wife Liz — as well as Beau, of course — below (video courtesy IndyCar):