Kimball posts strong fourth-place finish

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Charlie Kimball’s fourth-place finish on Sunday at Barber Motorsports Park would appear to be a definite sign of progress for the third-year IndyCar racer. The American finished 12th in the season-opener at St. Petersburg, but this weekend, he managed to convert his first-ever berth in the Firestone Fast Six into his second career Top 5 result.

Kimball led briefly for three laps in the race’s middle segment, but his best moment of the day arguably came on Lap 77 when he managed to get past Will Power through the track’s high-speed switchback section for fourth.

“The whole team did a great job this weekend, from the guys in the pits to the engineering staff working on race strategy,” Kimball said. “I just had to get it done on the race track. We started to see some real improvement at St. Petersburg, but didn’t really get the result we deserved. But it all came together for us today and it feels great.”

Kimball’s run was also part of a good weekend for Chip Ganassi Racing in their campaign for diabetes awareness with Novo Nordisk. Ganassi cars across IndyCar, NASCAR and Grand-Am competed with blue wheels, which represented the blue circle that serves as a global symbol for the International Diabetes Foundation (Kimball himself was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 2007).

In addition to Scott Dixon (second) and Kimball contributing Top 5 IndyCar finishes at Barber, Ganassi’s Grand-Am team of Scott Pruett and Memo Rojas notched a fourth-place run there as well. Also, Jamie McMurray finished seventh today in the Sprint Cup race at Martinsville, which he drove with a blue-and-orange scheme that echoed Kimball’s open-wheel livery.

“I’ll have to talk to Novo Nordisk to let me run that scheme all year,” Kimball told SPEED.com’s Marshall Pruett afterwards.

Relive the 1911 Indy 500 in living color

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Race fans and historians will have an opportunity to relive the 1911 Indy 500 in color this Sunday, November 25 at 8 p.m. ET.

Airing on the Smithsonian Channel as part of their America in Color series, a colorized version of the first Indy 500 highlights a race that began a tradition more than 100 years old.

The Indy 500 helped establish the auto racing industry and part of the episode deals with the lives of the Ford, Firestone and Edison families.

On board mechanics were a fixture of racing at the time – in part because they also served as spotters. On Lap 90 Joe Jagersberger (running three laps down at the time) broke a steering mount and his rider tumbled onto the track, causing Harry Knight to careen into the pits – which had no wall separating it from the track. Remarkably, no one was killed.

The documentary describes how Ray Harroun likely won because of his use of a rear view mirror that allowed him to drive without an on board mechanic. Innovation in that inaugural race set the tone for racing today.

Harroun beat Ralph Mumford by a margin of 103 seconds in a race that took six hours, 42 minutes to run.