HPD celebrates 20 years with Indy, ALMS drivers

Leave a comment

Honda’s IndyCar drivers for the 2013 season made an appearance in Honda Performance Development’s headquarters in Santa Clarita, Calif., earlier this week, to celebrate HPD’s 20th year since its 1993 founding. Tweets rolled in from the IndyCar drivers and American Le Mans Series drivers (Lucas Luhr, who won the ALMS Long Beach race in a Muscle Milk HPD prototype) throughout the day.

Takuma Sato’s win must have featured some celebration because fellow Honda driver Ana Beatriz posted an Instagram photo of the Long Beach winner passed out in a car en route to HPD. Simon Pagenaud, Justin Wilson and Josef Newgarden were also amused onlookers.

At St. Petersburg, Honda premiered a “big head” campaign (pictured) – where they took the Honda drivers’ headshots and blew them up onto giant cardboard cutouts that were on display first in the pit lane, and later in the grandstands. The tradition has been popular at college basketball games in years past.

Honda joined IndyCar in 1994, won its first race with Andre Ribeiro at Loudon, N.H. in 1995, and its first championship with KV Racing Technology co-owner Jimmy Vasser, then driving for Target Chip Ganassi Racing, in 1996.

Vasser’s title set of a streak of six consecutive Honda titles in CART, won by Alex Zanardi (1997-98), Juan Montoya (1999) and Gil de Ferran, a new HPD ambassador (2000-01) before they moved to the IRL ranks in 2003.

Honda won its first Indianapolis 500 with Buddy Rice in 2004, also the same year it took its first IRL title with Tony Kanaan. From 2006 through 2011, Honda served as the sole supplier of engines for IndyCar – which dropped the beleaguered IRL moniker ahead of open wheel unification in 2008.

IndyCar at IMS Friday: How to watch, start times, live streaming info

IndyCar Indianapolis start times
Jamie Squire/Getty Images
Leave a comment

With three races remaining in the NTT IndyCar Series season, Scott Dixon has a commanding lead and history on his side entering Friday’s opener of the Harvest GP at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

The five-time series champion leads defending champ Josef Newgarden by 72 points.

Since 2014, the points leader with three races left has won the championship in five of the past six years, including Dixon in ’18.

The Chip Ganassi Racing driver has led the championship standings following every round after opening 2020 with three consecutive victories. Dixon also led the points by 78 points with three races remaining when he won the title in 2008.

Dixon, Newgarden, Pato O’Ward, Colton Herta, Will Power, Graham Rahal and Takuma Sato are championship eligible.

Anyone outside 108 points of the lead after Indy will be eliminated heading into the Oct. 25 season finale at St. Petersburg, Florida.

Here is the IndyCar Harvest GP at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway road course schedule for Friday (all times are ET), including details and start times:


Indianapolis Motor Speedway TV schedule for Friday

IndyCar Harvest GP Race 1: 3:30 p.m., USA Network, NBC Sports Gold and streaming on the NBC Sports App and NBCSports.com); Leigh Diffey is the lead announcer for IndyCar on NBCSN this weekend with analysts Townsend Bell and Paul Tracy.


IndyCar Harvest GP, Race 1 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway start times, information

COMMAND TO START ENGINES: 3:53 p.m.

GREEN FLAG: 4 p.m.

DISTANCE: The race is 85 laps (207.35 miles) around Indianapolis Motor Speedway’s a 2.439-mile, 14-turn road course in Indianapolis.

TIRE ALLOTMENT: Nine sets primary, five sets alternate (A 10th set of primary tires is available to any car fielding a rookie.) Teams must use one set of primary and one set of alternate tires in the race.

PUSH TO PASS: 200 seconds of total time with a maximum time of 20 seconds per activation.

FORECAST: According to Wunderground.com, it’s expected to be 57 degrees with a 0% chance of rain at the green flag.

QUALIFYING: 6:20 p.m. Thursday (NBC Sports Gold)

ENTRY LIST: Click here for the 25 drivers racing this weekend at Indianapolis